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Convict Ship Phoenix (1) 1828 

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Select from the Links below to find information about Convict Ships arriving in New South Wales, Norfolk Island and Van Diemen's Land between the years 1788 and 1850.

A B C D E F G H I
                 
J -K L M N - O P - Q R S T - V W - Y


Embarked: 190 men
Voyage: 129 days
Deaths: 0
Surgeon's Journal: yes
Tons: 423
Crew: 29 men
Previous vessel: Borodino arrived 12 July 1828
Next vessel: Bussorah Merchant arrived 26 July 1828
Captain Thomas Cuzens
Surgeon Superintendent William Bell Carlisle
The Phoenix previously transported prisoners in 1822.

The Phoenix was the next convict ship to leave England for New South Wales after the departure of the Asia in November 1827.

The Guard for the Phoenix consisted of Captain Collet Barker, Lieutenant Moore and 30 men of the 39th regiment, together with four women and six children. They received their orders to embark on the Phoenix on 30 January 1828. Select here to find convict ships bringing detachments of the 39th regiment.

The Phoenix departed Spithead on 9 March 1828.

Surgeon-Superintendent William Bell Carlisle kept a Medical Journal from 29 January to 30 July 1828.   There were no deaths on the voyage and most of the illness was trivial. Nineteen year old George Williams spent an uncomfortable few days with a most excruciating headache which he attributed to having exposed himself to the sun for some time without his cap. He was put on the sick list on 25 April 1828 at sea and was well again after five days.

 Towards the latter end of the voyage a few additional ounces of lemon juice were given daily to 15 of the convicts who were discovered to have a scorbutic sponginess of the gums which yielded readily to the Lime Juice in eight or ten days.

One natural labour a few nights before arrival in Sydney was the only additional incident Dr. Carlisle thought worth mentioning

The Phoenix arrived in Port Jackson on 14th July 1828.  The surgeon considered that every individual of the convicts and Guard were landed at Sydney in a state fit for duty.

A Muster was held on board by Colonial Secretary Alexander McLeay on 18th July 1828 and the Prisoners were landed on Monday 28th July. The Australian reported that with few exceptions they were an uncommonly healthy and robust body of men.

Nearly the entire shipload had been assigned to the service of private individuals, many in Sydney.

A prisoner of the Crown who made his escape from Sydney in the ship England in 1826 was returned by the Phoenix. He had visited China and India and almost circumnavigated the globe before being re-transported for life on the Phoenix. Undaunted, an hour or two after landing and being placed in barracks he contrived to make a slip from his lodgings and to pay a visit to some of his old haunts in Sydney......  This was William Penny, who was formerly a messenger in the Commissariat Department. After being overhauled at the inspection of the ship's prisoners in Hyde Park Barracks on Monday last, and whilst on his way from thence to the Phoenix Hulk, preparatory to transportation to Norfolk Island, he managed to effect his escape from the constable who had him in charge- . The Monitor 2 August 1828

William Bell Carlisle was also surgeon on the convict ships Asia, Morley in 1823 (VDL), Henry in 1825, Andromeda in 1827 (VDL) and the Marquis of Huntley in 1830.  



Notes & Links:

1). Seventeen convict ships arrived in New South Wales in 1828 - Florentia, Elizabeth, Marquis of Huntley, Hooghly, Morley, Asia, Mangles, Borodino, Phoenix, Bussorah Merchant, Countess of Harcourt, Competitor, Marquis of Hastings, Albion, City of Edinburgh, Eliza, Royal George

2). The death of Captain Barker in April 1831 at Encounter Bay South Australia.......

It only remains for us to notice the subject which forms the principal topic of the last chapter, namely the melancholy murder of Captain Barker by the natives. It appears that Captain Sturt, in his visit to the southern coast, not being in a condition himself to make the examination, recommended to the colonial government a further investigation of the territory intervening between the most eastern point of Encounter Bay, and the head of St Vincent's Gulf. Captain Collet Barker was appointed to perform this duty, he having been well fitted for the task by his long intercourse with the natives on the northern coast, to whose hands he had frequently entrusted himself.

Captain Barker accepted his appointment, and in due time landed on the coast of St. Vincent's Gulf, at a spot which, from its rich soil and picturesque scenery, was peculiarly inviting, It appears that, in the pursuit of his scientific objects in this quarter, the Captain, though in a very unhealthy state, ventured upon swimming across a tide, in order to gain a hillock at a short distance, which was calculated to facilitate some observations that he desired to make. He was observed by several of his comrades, who, in the first instance, endeavoured to dissuade him from his purpose to ascend the hillock, which he had reached from the water. He then descended from the top on the opposite side, but was seen no more.

Mr. Kent, one of the companions of Captain Barker, remained waiting on the shore with two soldiers, in expectation of seeing him re-ascend the hillock every moment; but they waited in vain, and at last, having conducted the soldiers along the shore to obtain wood for firing, the party was struck with a distant shout, which was recognised to have proceeded from a white man. The evening closed, and yet no tidings arrived of Captain Barker; but whilst the party, assembled round their evening fire, were anxiously speculating on his fate, their conversation was interrupted, in a manner which Captain Sturt describes: Soon after night-fall, however, their attention was roused by the sound of the natives, and it was at length discovered that they had lighted a chain of small fires between the sand-hill Captain Parker had ascended, and the opposite side of the channel, around which their women were chanting their melancholy dirge. It struck upon the ears of the listeners with an ominous thrill, and assured them of the certainty of the irreparable loss they had sustained.

All night did those dismal sounds echo along that lonely shore, but as morning dawned, they ceased, and Mr. Kent and his companions were again left in anxiety and doubt. They, at length, thought it most advisable to proceed to the schooner to advise with Doctor Davies. They traversed the beach with hasty steps, but did not get on board till the following day. It was then determined to procure assistance from the sealers on Kangaroo Island, as the only means by which they could ascertain their leader's fate, and they accordingly entered American Harbour. For a certain reward, one of the men agreed to accompany Mr. Kent to the main with a native woman, to communicate with the tribe that was supposed to have killed him. They landed at or near the rocky point of Encounter Bay, where they were joined by two other natives, one of whom was blind.

The woman was sent forward for intelligence, and, on her return, gave the following details :—It appears that, at a very considerable distance from the first sand-hill, there is another, to which Captain Barker must have walked, for the woman stated that three natives were going to the shore from their tribe, and that they crossed his tract. Their quick perception immediately told them it was an unusual impression. They followed upon it, and saw Captain Barker returning. They hesitated for a long time to approach him, being fearful of the instrument he carried. At length, however, they closed upon him. Captain Barker tried to sooth them; but finding that they were determined to attack him, he made for the water, from which he could not have been very far distant. One of the blacks immediately threw his spear, and struck him in the hip. This did not, however, stop him. He got among the breakers, when he received the second spear in the shoulder. On this, turning round, he received the third full m the breast: with such deadly precision do these savages cast their weapons. It would appear that the third spear was already on its flight when Captain Barker turned, and it is to be hoped that it was at once mortal. He fell on his back into the water. The natives then rushed in and dragging him out by the legs, seized their spears, and inflicted innumerable wounds upon his body; after which they threw it into deep water, and the sea tide carried it away......The Monthly Review

3).  Return of Convicts of the Phoenix assigned between 1st January 1832 and 31st March 1832 (Sydney Gazette 14 June 1832 21 June 1832; 28 June 1832).....
Edward Cooney (Cony) Cooper assigned to T.V. Blomfield at Maitland
Edward Coney Cooper's boy assigned to Thomas Wood at Sydney
John Ford Carver assigned to William Hibbert at Sydney
James Minham Poulterers' boy. Assigned to Matthew Chapman at Hunter's River



4). Convict ships bringing detachments of the 39th regiment included the following............

Departed Vessel Command
Dublin 16 March 1826 Regalia Lieutenant William Sacheverell Coke
Downs 6 May 1826 England Major George Pitt D'Arcy
Sheerness 16 May 1826 Marquis of Huntley Major Donald MacPherson
Cork 29 June 1826 Boyne Captain Thomas Edward Wright
Sheerness 8 August 1826 Speke Lieutenant Henry Clarence Scarman
Dublin 27 August 1826 Phoenix Lieutenant Charles Cox
Plymouth 4 October 1826 Albion Captain Francis Crotty
Plymouth 16 October 1826 Midas Lieutenant George Meares Bowen
Cork 14 January 1827 Mariner Captain Charles Sturt
Dublin 14 February 1827 Countess of Harcourt Ensign Spencer
Plymouth 31 March 1827 Guildford Captain John Douglas Forbes
Downs 17 April 1827 Manlius Quarter-master Benjamin Lloyd
Dublin 2 June 1827 Cambridge Colonel Patrick Lindesay
London 3 June 1827 Champion Ensign Reid
Spithead 9 March 1828 Phoenix Captain Collett Barker
London 27 March 1828 Bussorah Merchant Ensign W. Kennedy Child
Dublin 15 September 1828 Sophia Major Thomas Poole


5). Hunter Valley convicts / passengers arriving on the Phoenix in 1828

James Archer Clerk age 21 from Edinburgh. Tried in Surry 16 December 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing a watch. Assigned to William Harper at Oswald on arrival. Absconded in June 1829.
   
James Arnold Gardener from Godstone age 25. Tried in Surry 11 December 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing fowls. Assigned to James Busby at Hunter River on arrival.  Died at Newcastle December 1830.
   
John Baxter Ploughman from Suffolk age 44. Married with 1 child. Tried in Norfolk 7 August 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for lamb stealing. Assigned to Joseph Brooks Weller at Iron Bark Creek on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave in November 1836. Employed by Henry Fenwick in 1836/37. Died from natural causes age 67 at West Maitland in September 1845.
   
Ambrose Blackford Labourer from Bermondsay age 23. Tried in London 13 October 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for stealing a hat. Assigned to Sir John Jamieson at Regentville on arrival. Assigned to William Spears at Brisbane Water in 1836. Granted a Ticket of Leave for Brisbane Water in August 1836. Applied to marry Winifred Cudmore in March 1838.
   
John Brown Shepherd, butcher and ploughman age 33. Native place Norfolk. Tried in Cambridge 5 December 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for sheep stealing. Assigned to William Bell Carlyle on arrival. Granted a Ticket of leave for the district of Invermein in October 1836
   
John Brunel Widower age 45. Previous conviction in Rotterdam. occupation seaman. Native place Stralsand. Tried in Cambridge and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a silver cup. Assigned to the Dockyard in Sydney on arrival. Employed in government service at Maitland in 1831. Returned to Sydney in June 1831.
   
William Bullingham Farm labourer and shepherd from Worcester age 52. Married with 7 children. Tried 30 July 1828 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing. Assigned to Dr. Francis Moran at Ravensfield on arrival
   
Samuel Clow Native place Suffolk. Occupation ploughman. Convicted of stealing in a dwelling house at Bury St. Edmunds on 2 August 1827.  Assigned to R.C. Lethbridge at Parramatta on arrival. Ticket of leave for the district of Maitland cancelled in March 1844 as he was unable to support himself. Admitted to Newcastle gaol in May 1844 as his services were no longer required at Newcastle hospital. Returned to Hyde Park Barracks. In 1852 he was convicted of aggravated assault on Rose Fagan by hitting and kicking her and dragging her across the road where she was left with a broken leg. He was sentenced to 6 months work on the roads for the assault.
   
Edward Coney  / Cooney Coopers boy from Gibraltar age 17. Tried in Surry on 22 October 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing a cape.  Assigned to Thomas Valentine Bloomfield in June 1832. Became free on 22 December 1842.
   
James Cooke Farm labourer and servant from Suffolk age 19. Tried at Bury 2 August 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for robbing his master. Assigned to George Williams at Brisbane Grove on arrival.  Assigned to James Adair in 1836/37. Granted a ticket of leave for the district of Paterson in May 1839. Applied to marry Catherine Norrie in October 1841
   
Alfred Cooper Mason's labourer from Oxford. Tried 15 October 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for picking pockets. Assigned to J.P. Webber at Markham, Patterson's Plains on arrival.  Sent to Pinchgut Island in 1833 and again in 1841 for allowing himself to be bailed up by the bushrangers the Jewboy Gang. Granted a ticket of leave for Raymond Terrace in October 1842. Applied Sarah Perkins in October 1837. Permission denied. Applied to marry Johannah Kelly in June 1840
   
John Cope Mason's labourer from London. Tried 6 December 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for picking pockets. Assigned to Robert Lethbridge at Parramatta on arrival. Later in 1828 assigned to Robert Lethbridge at Hunter River and employed as a hutkeeper.
   
James Creek (Crick) Ploughman and fisherman from Suffolk. Married with 3 children. Tried at Ipswick 13 July 1827 and sentence to 7 years transportation for stealing malt. Assigned to J.P. Webber at Markham on arrival. Obtained a ticket of leave for Patersons Plains in November 1832
   
James Curtis Age 33. Married with 5 children. Native place Suffolk. Occupation Ploughman and herdsman. Tried at Ipswich 19 October 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing turkey. Assigned to Robert Crawford at Prospect on arrival. Labourer assigned to Thomas Crawford at Luskintyre in 1828
   
John Curtis Chimney sweep from Norfolk. Tried 11 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing. Assigned to George Williams on arrival
   
Sampson Curtis Ploughman from Suffolk. Married with 4 children. Tried at Bury on 2 August 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for house breaking. Assigned to Frederick A. Hely at Brisbane Water on arrival. Ticket of leave holder residing at Paterson in 1836/37
   
James Davies Married labourer age 25. Native place London. Tried 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. Assigned to Thomas Johns at Richmond on arrival. Granted a ticket of leave for the district of Scone in April 1843
   
John Entwistle Married with 2 children. Occupation cotton spinner. Native place Preston. Tried Lancaster 29 August 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. Assigned to the Weaving Establishment at Parramatta on arrival. In March 1834 apprehended after absconding from the service of Captain Samuel Wright. In April 1834 absconded from the escort to Merton. In December 1838 absconded from the service of Captain David Charles Frederick Scott at Muswellbrook.
   
George Francomb (Frankham) Age 25. Native place London. Occupation carpenter. Tried in Surry 30 April 1827 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years fro stealing serge. Assigned to William Carter at Piercefield, Hunter River on arrival.
   
Henry Fulton (Felton) Age 32. Native place Essex. Occupation labourer. Tried at Bury 5 April 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a ploughshare. Assigned to Francis Mitchell in Sydney on arrival.  In November 1828 assigned to Francis Mitchell at Melville, Luskintyre. In 1831 admitted to Newcastle gaol to await corporal punishment
   
Richard Glover Age 21. Reads. Married with 1 child.. Paviour from London. Tried 15 February 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing lead. Assigned to John Cobb at Hunter River on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in May 1832
   
Matthew Gooch Age 17. Reads and writes. Errand boy from Kent. Tried in Norfolk 11 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for picking pockets. 5ft 3 1/2 in, fair and ruddy complexion, light brown hair. No assignment listed, probably forwarded to Carter's Barracks on arrival. Assigned to Joseph Wilson at Port Macquarie in 1833. Granted a ticket of leave for Port Macquarie in August 1833. Sent to Pinchgut Island in 1840 for allowing himself to be bailed up by bushrangers the Jewboy Gang
   
James Gosling Age 22. Married. Gentleman's servant from Newington. Tried in Surry 11 December 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to J.B. Weller on arrival
   
Isaac Hainsworth Age 21. Reads. Brickmaker from Norfolk. Tried 23 March and sentenced to transportation for life for house stealing. Assigned to John Harris at South Creek on arrival. Ticket of leave cancelled for absconding from his hired service at Armidale in July 1851
   
James Hall Age 33. Labourer from Berks. Tried at Oxford 6 March 1827 and sentenced transportation for 7 years for stealing fowls. Assigned to John Martin Davis at Mary Ville, Durham, on arrival.  Dark ruddy compl, brown hair, brown eyes, nose rather inclining to right side. Absconded from Wollombi Bridge party 3 February 1834
   
Paul Harrison Age 37. Married with 6 children. Ploughman from Norfolk. Tried 24 March 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for sheep stealing. Assigned to James Mudie at Castle Forbes on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Patrick Plains in November 1832
   
James Harvey Age 22. Occupation Ploughman. Native place London. Tried in Norfolk 24 March 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for shooting with intent to kill. Blind in the left eye and wears earrings..Assigned to James Mudie at Castle Forbes on arrival.  James Harvey, Edward Macarthy, George Frost, Peter Ponsonby, William Crisp and James Smith shared a hut at Castle Forbes. James Harvey gave evidence at the trial of convicts from Castle Forbes - JAMES HARVEY SWORN - (ship Phoenix -I am five years in the colony last August. I was assigned to Mr. James Mudie on my arrival, and never was with another master; The flour that has been issued within the last three months was very bad. It is hardly fit to be called flour. It is mixed with grass seed and smut; the best was sent away, and the bad kept for the men. I never made any complaint to the Magistrates. It was a dangerous thing to do. Any one that found fault was considered an insubordinate character. If any man spoke of it, Mr. Mudie would call him an insubordinate character, and hunt him down. I have seen men lay down their meat, and refuse to take it, as not eatable, rather than complain. I have been before the Bench, on complaint of Mr. Mudie, two or three times. I was flogged only once with fifty lashes, and in the iron gang twice, for the last twelve or eighteen -months the flour was inferior, but bad for three months. It was issued by Patrick Crinane, an overseer. I never on any occasion, when brought before the Magistrates, made any complaint of the bad treatment I received, and the bad flour I got. I cannot say how much flour I got, but it was supposed to be ten pounds for a week . The meat is served out in messes, and weighed before the men came from their work. I always saw the flour weighed. We used to get salt and soap, the latter once a fortnight. I have been weeks without salt at a time. I have been without it within the last six months. We have had, at times, a pint of milk allowed, and at times a quart. I got the last suit of clothing when I was going to Sydney, three weeks last Monday. I got a shirt and shoes the 1st of August last. There are no slops (due to me now. The pair of shoes I got were kept by Mr. Larnach for me, in store, and he has them still. I have seen the overseer take maggots off the meat, within the last three months, but do not know the exact time. The meat was served out twice a week. I was at Sydney as a witness for the prisoners tried then. I did not know what I was brought for. I knew them to be punished on the farm. I recollect Reilly and others, with myself, going to Mr. John Larnach, to complain of the flour. we told him we would complain to the Magistrates. We got better flour soon after, mixed with other flour. I have worked on Sunday, loading a team, before the steamer was changed.
   
Charles Hawkins Age 25. Married with 1 child. Cowherder and drover, native of London. Tried in London 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for horse stealing. Assigned to Sir John Jamieson at Regentsville on arrival. Absconded from No. 20 Road Gang in November 1829. Assigned to Timothy Nowlan at Paterson in 1836/37. Absconded in April 1839. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in May 1843. Ticket cancelled in May 1844 for disorderly conduct and assaulting a constable
   
Thomas Holland Age 54. Widower with six children. Ploughman from Essex. Tried 10 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing wheat. Left arm disabled. Assigned to John Martin Davis at Mary Ville, Durham on arrival
   
James Holmes Age 22. Reads. Farm Labourer from Suffolk. Tried 15 January 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing. Brother of Henry who arrival by the same transport. Assigned to Andrew Lang at Dunmore on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave in October 1832 and a Certificate of Freedom in February 1834
   
Thomas Howard Age 33. Married with 3 children. Farm labourer from Suffolk. Tried at Ipswich 12 January 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for poaching. Assigned to John Palmer junior at Richmond vale, Patterson's Plains on arrival. Granted a Certificate of Freedom in February 1834
   
James Hull / Hall Age 21. Native place Northampton shire. Ploughman and shepherd. Tried 21 July 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for stealing beasts. Assigned to Sir John Jamieson at Regent Ville on arrival. Assigned to Thomas Valentine Bloomfield in December 1832. Punished at Maitland in September 1833.....Return of Corporal Punishment inflicted by Sentence of the Bench in the presence of Philip Nichol Anley, Magistrate. 50 lashes for threatening his overseer. Back lacerated and bled much. Appeared to suffer much
   
John Jackson Age 32. Ploughs & weaver, native of Lancashire. Tried 29 August 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for house breaking. Assigned to Sir John Jamieson at Regentville on arrival. Assigned to John Herring Boughton at Paterson in 1836/37. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Paterson in June 1837
   
John Knowles Age 24. Native place York. Occupation shoe maker. Tried in Leeds 15 October 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing potatoes. Assigned to Sir John Jamison at Regentville on arrival. In April 1834 sentenced to 12 months in an iron gang for violent and disorderly conduct and striking his overseer (Goulburn Bench) In September 1835 he was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Patrick Plains under sentence of 14 days in the cells and then to be returned to his master
   
James Langham Age 20. Labourer, native of Co. Mayo. Tried in London 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to John Palmer junior at Richmond Vale on arrival
   
Patrick Leary Age 23. Native place Cork. Occupation ploughman. Tried at Lancaster 3 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to James McDougall at Patrick Plains on arrival. Assigned to Timothy Nowlan in August 1834. Died age 26 at Newcastle Hospital in August 1834.
   
Henry Lovett Age 22. Married. Labourer from Norfolk. Tried 24 March 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for robbery of a person. Assigned to J.P Webber at Penshurst, Patterson's Plains. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Patterson's Plains in November 1832. Died age 33 in October 1838 and buried in Glebe Cemetery.
   
Christopher Mileham Age 21. Native place Norfolk. Occupation weaver. Tried 7 August 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for house breaking. Sent to the Weaving Establishment at Parramatta on arrival. Assigned to J.T. Baker (probably John Thomas Baker) at Maitland in 1836/37. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in August 1838. Granted a 2nd Class conditional pardon dated 2 March 1846
   
James Minham Age 17. Native place London. Poulterers boy. Tried in Surry 22 October 1827 and sentenced to 14 years transportation for street robbery. No place of assigned recorded on arrival. Probably sent to Carters Barracks. Punished at Paterson in September 1833.....Return of Corporal Punishment inflicted by Sentence of the Bench in the presence of Philip Nichol Anley, Magistrate. 50 lashes for absenting at night. Back much cut.  Assigned to Robert Adamson Rodd at Patrick Plains in 1836/37. Absconded from R.A.  Rodd at Wollombi in May 1840 and apprehended in September 1840. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Patrick Plains in February 1842
   
James Musk Age 19. Labourer from Suffolk. Tried 15 January 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for house breaking. Assigned to J.P. Webber at Marford, on arrival
   
George Nelson Age 20. Reads and writes. Labourer from Hants. Tried 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for stealing a coat. Assigned to J.P. Webber at Marford
   
William Payne Age 41. Married with 4 children. Tanner from Suffolk. Tried 5 April 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. Assigned to Peter McIntyre at Segenhoe on arrival
   
William Pearce Age 20. Reads and writes. Labourer from London. Tried at Surry 11 December 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to George Milner Slade at Port Stephens on arrival
   
Henry Phipps Age 19. Stable boy from Gloucester. Reads and writes. Tried in London 25 October 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for horse stealing. Description 5ft 4 1/2in; pale fair complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Assigned to Camden district on arrival. Assigned to J.B. Bettington at Merton in 1836/37. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Merton in October 1837. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Penrith in August 1841.  Granted permission to marry Ann Donald (free emigrant per Hero) at Moreton Bay in May 1842.
   
John Piggott Age 30. Widower with 3 children. Native place Cambridge. Occupation gardener. Tried 13 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing sacks. Assigned to Samuel Marsden for the Agricultural Society on arrival. In April 1844 admitted to Newcastle gaol from Murrurundi. To be sent for trial for having stolen property in his possession knowing it to be stolen.
   
William Ramsdale Age 18. Shoemakers boy from London. Tried 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to Francis Mitchell at Sydney on arrival. Assigned to Francis Mitchell at Melville, Luskintyre in November 1828 (Census). Granted a Ticket of leave for the district of Invermein in April 1838
   
Joseph Read Age 27. Married with 1 child. Native place Warwick. Occupation brass worker. Tried 26 March 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. Assigned to the Engineers Department on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in October 1833
   
John Riley Age 17. Cow boy from London. Tried 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Assigned to James Jenkins at North Shore Sydney on arrival. Assigned to the Australian Agricultural company at Newcastle in August 1833 when he was charged with drunkenness and insolence to the Barracks master. Granted a Ticket of leave for the district of Brisbane Water in October 1836. Granted a Conditional Pardon dated 1 February 1843
   
John Smith Age 20. Ploughs and stableman, native of Hampshire. Tried Berks 10 July 1827 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for stealing an umbrella. Assigned to J.P. Webber at Penshurst on arrival
   
William Spittle Age 32. Reads and writes. Married with 3 children. Shepherd from Northampton. Tried 21 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing rabbits. Assigned to Dr. William Bell Carlysle at Hunter River on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the Upper Hunter River district in November 1832. Granted a Certificate of Freedom in October 1834
   
John Stapleford Age 54. Reads and writes. Widower with 2 children. Shepherd from Lincolnshire. Tried in Lincoln 9 July 1827 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing goslings. Assigned to Peter McIntyre on arrival. Assigned to John McIntyre at Patrick Plains in November 1828 (Census). Granted a Ticket of Leave for the Upper Hunter River in November 1832.
   
Edward Topper Age 20. Reads and writes. Whitesmith's boy from London. Tried 13 September 1827 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for stealing shoes. Assigned to Thomas Howard at Cornwallis on arrival. Granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in July 1832. His wife Harriett Turner (per ship Buffalo) absconded from him at Wollombi in September 1843
   
George Wright William Wright age 38 and George Wright age 28 admitted to the York hulk from Newgate prison on 12 November 1827 both under sentence of transportation for 14 years for stealing tobacco. Sent to the convict ship Phoenix 27 February 1828 for transportation to NSW. George Wright granted a Ticket of Leave for the district of Maitland in June 1837
   
William Wright William Wright age 38 and George Wright age 28 admitted to the York hulk from Newgate prison on 12 November 1827 both under sentence of transportation for 14 years for stealing tobacco. Sent to the convict ship Phoenix 27 February 1828 for transportation to NSW. William Wright assigned to Peter McIntyre at Bulwarra near Maitland in November 1828 (Census). Assigned to Andrew McDougall at Patrick Plains in July 1832. Ticket of Leave holder at Maitland in 1836/37.
   
   



  

 

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