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Item: 172255
Surname: Black Billy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 11 March 1863
Place: Ellalong
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: Sentenced to 10 years hard labour on the public roads for assault with attempt to commit rape on Melinda Charlotte Harris, daughter of Shadrick William and Ann Melinda Harris, a child of three years of age


 
Item: 167428
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 April 1848
Place: West Maitland
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: Aboriginal Murder.-On Wednesday morning, the body of a black-fellow, named Black Boy, a member of the Newcastle tribe, was found lying dead in the yard of the Queens Head Inn West Maitland. The poor fellow had been killed apparently by some heavy blows with a tomahawk about the ear, as he was lying asleep; and, from his easy posture, appeared to have died instantly, and without the slightest struggle. For some months past Black Boy had been working about Maitland, cutting wood and carrying water for different persons, and was very harmless and quiet. What may have been the cause of his murder is not known, but it was most probably some old grudge. On Tuesday last Black Boy and three members of the Old Banks tribe were about a good deal together, and in the evening Black Roy and one of the Old Banks tribe (a tall fellow, with one eye,) camped together in the Queen s Head yard. About ten o clock in the evening, the one-eyed black went into the Queens Head kitchen with an old quart pot, to beg some hot water to make tea. The water was given to him in the -pot, which he said contained tea; and from that moment not a sound was heard from the yard all night. In the morning Black Boy was found murdered as above described, but the one-eyed black had disappeared, as well as the pot and every other article the two had possessed. On Wednesday afternoon an inquest was held on the body, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner, when Dr. Sloan made a post mortem examination, and found that, although there were several jagged incised wounds on the right side of the head, neither the scull nor jaw was fractured: death, in his opinion, was caused by a wound inflicted over the carotid artery, rupturing its fibres, mid causing an effusion of blood, ending in death. It appeared from the evidence that on the Monday night previously, Black Boy had suddenly left the camping place where he was sleeping with some of the Old Banks blacks and next day gave as a reason that they were going to kill him. The Jury returned a verdict that Black Boy was wilfully murdered by some black or blacks unknown


 
Item: 167434
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 6 May 1848
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Death of an Aboriginal from Wounds received in Fighting.-On Friday se night two aboriginals of the Maitland tribe quarrelled about a gin, and fought for some time. At length one of them, named Gorman, gained the victory, beating his opponent, Black Boy, so savagely about the head with a waddy, as to leave him senseless on the field of battle, just on the outskirts of the town. Black Boy lingered till Sunday, and then died, from the effects of the injuries he had received. On Monday he was buried by the tribe, who, whether purposely or not we do not know, buried him in a paddock, where a lot of bullocks were running, selecting a spot which the bullocks used as a road;after interring the body the blacks beat and smoothed the earth above it till it was quite level with that around, and the bullocks having walked backwards and forwards over it as usual, the spot has become quite undistinguishable to the eye of a white man


 
Item: 168716
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: February 1843
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: State Archives NSW; Item: 2/2009; Roll: 757.....Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books
Details: Black Boy and Joe Brace from Maitland admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 1 month in the cells or a fine of 5 pounds for exposing their person


 
Item: 182320
Surname: Black Boy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 29 December 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: John Byrne per John Barry and Michael Toomy per Hooghley, both in government service charged with theft. John Cooper states - On Tuesday last on my return from my work, I found that my house had been forcibly entered and that one shirt, one pair of trowsers, and a blanket belonging to myself and a short and pair of trowsers belonging to James Kellet had been carried off. Some stolen articles belonging to James Wilkins who also lived in the house were missing. The staple of the front door had been forced and the back door had been opened apparently on the inside. I immediately reported the circumstances to Constable Peter Riley. About an hour after William Webster who is the government servant of the Rev. Middleton, came to me saying that he understood I had been robbed and that a black native called Black Boy could show me where the things were. I went to the native who took me to the hollow behind the church where I found the blanket and one of the shirts which had been stolen. I asked if he knew who put them there. He said twas Duffy and a man who lived at my house. ON my questioning Duffy he told me he had not robbed me himself but he knew who had. Timothy Duffy states - I saw Byrne and Toomy together on Tuesday morning between the hours of 8 and 9 near where I live and at a little distance from Coopers. They were coming in the direction from the back of his house. Toomy had a bundle in his hand. Toomy and Byrne came to the door of my hut. Byrne lives in the hut with me, he went in and staid from ten to twenty minutes. Toomy wanted to go in also but I would not suffer him as I thought he had come dishonestly by the bundle which he carried upon which Toomy went away with it over the Hill towards the Church. I did not mention any of these circumstances to the constables until I was taken to the watch house on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery. The prisoner deny the charge and call in their defence William PItt who being sworn states - I was at the house adjoining where Duffy lives on Tuesday morning a little after 8 o clock. I saw a man with a bundle under his arm coming from the back of Coopers house. I had no suspicion of anything wrong. I thought he might be taking linen from the Parsonage to the washerwoman, as the path from there into the town passes at the back of Coopers. I do not know the man who carried the bundle. He was much taller than either of the prisoners who I know well. John Corrigan, states - I went to my work on Tuesday morning at six o clock at the mines. Byrne works there also. He works below. There are two spells. I am not certain whether he remained at the mines or went away during his spell hour. The Bench taking into their consideration the notoriously bad character of the witness Duffy acquit the prisoners


 
Item: 177078
Surname: Black boy (Teta) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: June 1850
Place: Singleton
Source: State Library of NSW. Papers relating to Aborigines in the Singleton District, Blanket for Native Blacks, Colonial Secretarys Office
Details: Age 33. On Return of Aborigines to receive blankets


 
Item: 185638
Surname: Black Dick (indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 19 May 1861
Place: Darlinghurst gaol
Source: Darlinghust Gaol Entrance Book. State Archives NSW; Roll: 266
Details: Black Dick sent from Maitland to Darlinghurst gaol . Sentenced to 2 years labour at Parramatta for attempt at rape


 
Item: 185639
Surname: Black Dick (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 30 March 1861
Place: Maitland gaol
Source: Maitland Gaol Entrance Book. State Archives NSW; Roll: 2370
Details: Black Dick, labourer born at Cockfighters Creek. Admitted to Maitland gaol from Wollombi. Sent for trial at quarter sessions


 
Item: 168653
Surname: Black Harry (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 November 1861
Place: East Maitland
Source: SMH
Details: The execution of the aboriginal murderer Harry to take place in the gaol at East Maitland


 
Item: 173102
Surname: Black Harry (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 6 December 1842
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: State Archives NSW. Gaol Entrance Books. Item: 2/2020; Roll: 757
Details: Admitted to Newcastle gaol on a charge of assault. Sentenced to 14 days hard labour


 
Item: 176926
Surname: Black Harry (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1861
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Weekly Mercury 14 March 1896
Details: After execution, his body was buried in the RC cemetery East Maitland. The grave was opened by sculptor and the head severed from his body for the purpose of having a cast taken which was done by Wattle McGill. A cast was kept for many years by Major Sloan and then donated to the Techological Museum, the forerunner of the Powerhouse Museum. In 1896 the cast had been freshened up with a coat of lamp black. The lips were very thick and prominent, the jawbones heavy, the nose broad and flat, the eye brows prominent and the head developed in an extraordinary degree (quote)


 
Item: 176930
Surname: Black Harry (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1861
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Weekly Mercury 30 November 1895
Details: The most sensational case tried at the Maitland Circuit Court in September 1861 was that of an aborigine known as Black Harry who had in a short but desperate and inhuman career of crime committed a series of diabolical murders and outrages and robberies to no end. He was the terror of the district between Merriwa and Gunnedah during his reign but at length after cunningly eluding his pursuers he was captured by Mr. John Humpries a squatter residing on his station called Borah and lodged in the Gunedah lockup. Harry was a native of the McIntyre River tribe of aborigines about 5ft 7in and said not to be bad looking. He spoke English well and was very intelligent. The story of his crimes and capture may be interesting. It appears that a shepherd named Richard Mills was living un Gundabri station, Halls Creek with his wife and two children, the latter aged nine and five years. On the 16th July Mills legt his hut and was away shepherding all day. Black Harry, who was engaged on the same station, came to the place about 11 oclock that morning and he and the boy went out into the bush to look for possums taking with them a tomahawk . The blackfellow caught some possums and the boy lit a fire on which they were roasted. While the boy was sitting down watching the operation of cook, Harry without a word of warning struck him on the back of the head with a tomahawk twice and left him for dead. Harry then returned to Mills hut and brutally murdered Mrs. Mills nearly severing her head from her body with several blows of the tomahawk. He then ransacked the place and carried away with hi the little girl who was never aterwards seen and it is supposed that she too met with the same awful fate as her mother. After this he committed a series of outrages and robberies and though a reward was offered for his capture , he managed to elude the vigilance of his pursuers for a considerable time


 
Item: 184492
Surname: Black Harry (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 14 March 1896
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Weekly Mercury
Details: A Cast of Black Harry. - Black Harry was hanged in East Maitland in 1861 for a murderous outrage committed on a boy in the Hunter district and which led up to a series of diabolical crimes perpetrated between the offence mentioned and his capture some few months afterwards. His grave in the Roman Catholic Cemetery at East Maitland being opened by a well known scuptor, and Black Harrys head severed from his body for the purpose of having a cast taken from it. Several casts were taken in plaster of Paris by Mr. Wattie McGill, and one of these was shown by Major Sloan who had it in his possession for many years notwithstanding the fact of its being in 1893 floods, the cast was almost as good as new, freshed up with a coat of lamp black.....The cast was handed over to the Tecnhological Museum by Major Sloan etc.


 
Item: 178607
Surname: Black Jack (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 26 July 1855
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: Newcastle Gaol Entrance Book. State Archives NSW. Roll 757
Details: Admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland. Sentenced to 6 months hard labour. Discharged January 1856.


 
Item: 5870
Surname: Black Jemmy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: June 1833
Place: Liverpool Plains
Source: R v Finney - SC
Details: Native. Stole sheep from Dangar s property. Subsequently killed


 
Item: 168721
Surname: Black Joe (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 3 March 1848
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: State Archives NSW; Item: 2/2009; Roll: 757.....Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books
Details: Sent to Newcastle gaol for one month for assault.


 
Item: 169577
Surname: Black Joe (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 7 March 1848
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: Gaol Entrance Books. State Archives NSW; Item: 2/2009; Roll: 757 (Ancestry)
Details: Aboriginal native. Admitted to Newcastle gaol from Newcastle town under sentence of 1 month in the cells


 
Item: 124942
Surname: Black Nelly (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 9 November 1837
Place: Newcastle
Source: Newcastle Bench Books. AONSW Reel 2722
Details: Enoch Havens sentenced to 50 lashes for striking Black Nelly and knocking her down in the street. She had been following him asking for rum


 
Item: 183277
Surname: Blanket Distribution (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: April 1841
Place: Stroud
Source: The Wingham Chronicle 10 August 1943
Details: Captain Thomas Cook - Being at Stroud this week I had an opportunity of hearing some of the aboriginal natives inquire most anxiously for their blankets, which they seem to prize greatly. The mornings and evenings begin to get chilly on these mountains, and I fear that unless the blacks get some little shelter in the shape of a blanket or ^ other covering they will get discontented. They are numerous here and have hitherto been quiet and harm less, many of the men proving useful to the overseers at the Companys out-stations. But if deprived of their wanted present from His Excellency I will not answer for their continuing so, I remember some five or six years ago going out with a party in search of nine pirates who, on being closely pursued at sea, had scuttled the vessel they stole at Sydney and landed on the beach at Port Stephens and were made an easy capture by the assistance of two female aboriginals who, themselves, told me they had tricked the white fellows knowing I was in quest of them and because the Governor had given them blankets. At all evens I would recommend a supply of blankets for the use of the women and children who other wise must be left naked and comfort less it being a standing order of the Commissioner of the A.A. Company that no black girls be harboured at the huts of the companys estate. If then, His Excellency the Governor would consent to send even one half (say 100) of the former quantity I shall take care that they are properly distributed among those most deserv ing and in greatest need of such a boon.


 
Item: 177013
Surname: Blind Boko (Kabullah) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 24 May 1849
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: State Library of NSW. Papers relating to Aborigines in the Singleton District, Blanket for Native Blacks, Colonial Secretarys Office
Details: Age 45. On Return of Aborigines to receive blankets



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