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Item: 168022
Surname: Middleton (obit.,)
First Name: Cecil
Ship: -
Date: 12 August 1925
Place: Goulburn
Source: SMH
Details: DEATH OF MR. C. MIDDLETON. When the late Mr. Cecil Middleton joined the Sydney General Post Office as a telegraph operator, the staff consisting of but eleven men and six boys. Mr. Middleton died recently, within a year of his centenary, at Goulburn. Since his retirement from the service 19 years ago, Mr. Middleton had lived on the heights of West Goulburn. A studious man, Mr. Middleton was a son of the Rev. George Middleton. His literary possessions were most valuable and among them were some historical documents of great interest. Among these was an old copy of an extract from the Journal of Governor Macquarie. The original, in Macquaries own handwriting, is in the Mitchell Library. "This afternoon there anchored in Sydney Cove the ship Prince Regent, transport, commanded by Captain William Arden, with 100 male convicts from England, whence she sailed on October 8, 1819, touching at no intermediate ports, Mr. Hunter, R. N., being surgeon superintendent, and a squad of 31 soldiers of the 48thRegiment being commanded by Cornet Chambers, of the 21st Light Dragoons. The convicts and guard arrived in good health, none of either having died on the voyage. The Rev. Mr. George Middleton, assistant chaplain for the colony, the wife and three children of Cornet Chambers, and a Chelsea pensioner, have come out passengers in the ship." The entry is dated January 27, 1820. 'The "Sydney Gazette" of January 20, 1820, contains the following: "To be Assistant Chaplain. "His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, in the name and on behalf of his Majesty, having been graciously pleased to appoint the Rev. George Middleton, Clerk, now arrived by the Prince Regent, to be an assistant chaplain on the Colonial Establishment of New South Wales, his Excellency is pleased to order and direct that Mr. Middleton do henceforth perform duty at Sydney until he shall be permanently appointed to some other situation." (Signed) Macquarie. The letters patent were unfortunately lost in a flood at Raymond Terrace, on the Hunter River, many years after. The Rev. George Middleton later took temporary charge at Parramatta while the Rev. Samuel Marsden was away in New Zealand. In 1821 he was made incumbent of Newcastle, where he stayed till 1827. There is a memorial window In the Newcastle Cathedral erected by a son, Alexander Dillin Middleton in 1824 he married at Liverpool a Miss Rose, an English girl who came to the colony with her mother a few yours before. Eventually he settled at Morpeth, where Mr. Cecil Middleton was born on April29, 1846. The late Cecil Middleton was the youngest of a large family. Educated at Hinton, he had as schoolmates the late James Hogue and John See. In July, 1861, he joined the telegraph service at West Maitland, qualified as a junior operator, and joined the Sydney staff in 1863. Six months later he qualified as a senior. The telegraph department was a very unpretentious building. The station master was Mr. S. J. Watson, l ater superintendent of telephones. The office was in George-street ,opposite David Jones, and on the site of the George-street end of the present General Post Office. The department was under the Minister for Works, Mr. W. M. Arnold, who was later Speaker of the House of Assembly, and who was drowned in a flood in the Patterson River. The staff consisted of Edward Charles Cracknell, Superintendent; Phillip B. Walker, Inspector of lines and stations. - McAuliffe, clerk; - Muston, accountant, and his clerk, Jack Quodling; receiving officers, J. H. Miles and O. West; and the operators, W. Wilson, Wm. H. McGuire, and Cecil Middleton. One of the messengers was Mr. Burnett, who retired later as superintendent of mails. And every message to Sydney and suburbs was delivered by six messengers, who were mounted on ponies. After spending eighteen months in the Sydney office, Mr. Middleton was appointed telegraph master at Hay, and reached that town by proceeding by boat to Melbourne, thence by rail to Bendigo (Sandhurst), and then by Cobb and Co.'s coach to Hay. Here he opened the first telegraph office in that town. His next promotion was to Wagga, where he spent nine years. Wagga was then the centre of the southern racing world, and thousand-guinea cups were common trophies. In 1878 Mr. Middleton was appointed to Goulburn. His new office comprised a small cottage situated where the present Court-house now stands, but three years later the new building, the present post and telegraph office in that city, was opened. Mr. Middleton was in charge for 25 years, and on his retirement was honoured by the citizens. He had always taken a keen interest in local affairs. He was connected with the Goulburn Club, the Mechanics' institute, the Tirranna Race Club, and was for years a trustee of the Government Savings Bank. A Freetmason, he died on the 44th anniversary of his initiation to Lodge Australia. He is survived by two sons and a daughter, Messrs. Seymour Arnold Middleton and Selwyn Seymour Middleton, of Sydney; and Mrs. Ewan Fraser, well known in her younger days as Jessie Middleton, a noted musician. She now resides in England.


 
Item: 183810
Surname: Moore (obit)
First Name: Thomas Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1 August 1823
Place: Singleton
Source: The Maitland Daily Mercury
Details: A man well known in the business and commercial life of Singleton in the eighties and nineties in the person of Mr. Thomas Henry Moore, died in a private hospital in Summer Hill near Sydney. He was the only son of Mr. James Moore, founder of the well known firm of Messrs James Moore and Co., Singleton. Death followed a paralytic seizure. The deceased, who was born in Singleton was in his 76 year and for a number of years managed the business. He was an enterprising business man and a public spirited citizen. Deceased ight be regarded as the pioneer of the butter industry in Singleton district, which has now become so important as he started the first factory in Singleton, also creameries in various parts of the district. Deceased married Miss Jane Anderson, sister of Messrs. R. and Mel Anderson of Singleton


 
Item: 168628
Surname: Morisset (obit.,)
First Name: James Thomas
Ship: -
Date: 12 October 1852
Place: Bathurst
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: The late Colonel Morisset entered the army by purchase, in February, 1798, whilst only a youth of sixteen, and held the rank of lieutenant up to the year 1802, a considerable portion of the intervening period being spent in India and Egypt, where he was actively employed in several engagements. In the latter year he obtained permission to leave India in consequence of an attack of sickness, and returned to England ; but his health having been restored, he obtained a captain s commission by purchase, in the 48th regiment, with which he shipped for the Peninsula, and took part in some of the hardest fought battles of the time, under the command of Sir Arthur Wellesley. On the field of Albuera he received a severe sword wound in the head, which continued a source of great suffering and inconvenience to the day of his death. Returning to England at the declaration of peace in the year 1814, he remained in a state of in- action until 1817, when his regiment was ordered to this colony. Until 1825 he was employed as Commandant at Newcastle and in the district of Bathurst, and whilst occupying these posts, elicited the approval of the Government by his conduct. At the latter period he obtained leave to return to the mother country, and on the occasion of his departure received a cordial acknowledgment of the value of his services through the Governor s Private Secretary. Whilst at home he received the arduous appointment of civil and military Commandant of the penal settlement of Norfolk Island; but some unforeseen obstacles to his installation having occurred, which rendered a reference to the Imperial Government indispensable, he was appointed Principal Superintendent of Police, and continued to hold the situation until 1839, when he received orders to proceed to Norfolk Island, where he remained five years. In 1834 he disposed of his commission in the army, and four years afterwards became police magistrate of Bathurst- was subsequently appointed commissioner of insolvent estates, and for a short period officiated as commissioner of the Court of Requests. The first two appointments he retained to the period of his decease. To prove that his connection with the army was one of hard service, it is only necessary to mention the following engagements, in all of which he fought :-Toulouse, Orthes, Nive, Vittoria, Albuera, Busaco, and Talavera, these historical names being inscribed upon a medal which he held in token of his services. He also held an Egyptiac medal, but the names of the battles in which he took part whilst in that country are not specified. The proposition, therefore, with which this notice is commenced -that the late police magistrate of Bathurst had served his country with fidelity -and during the best years of a long life- time is sufficiently proved ; and after a perusal of the above naked facts, few will deny that he is worthy of favourable remembrance


 
Item: 168814
Surname: Morley (obit.,)
First Name: John
Ship: -
Date: 28 February 1899
Place: Newcastle
Source: Evening News
Details: Another old identity named John Morley died at Islington last week. He was born in 1836 in the Newcastle district where he resided the greater part of his life. He married in 1854 and had seven sons and four daughters of whom three daughters survive. Of grandchildren, there are twenty one living


 
Item: 173920
Surname: Moroney (obit.,)
First Name: Denis (Dennis)
Ship: -
Date: 21 July 1902
Place: Swan Street Hamilton
Source: NMH
Details: Early on Saturday morning Mr. Dennis Moroney a very old resident of the district died at the residence of his son. The deceased gentleman was well known in the Maitland, Cooranbong and Newcastle districts during the past fifty years. He was born in Cork Ireland on 4 March 1805 and was therefore in his ninety eight year. He left Ireland towards the end of the year 1851 and arrived in NSW in the beginning of the following year. He came out here with the intention of engagin in the farming industry and with his wife settled in West Maitland. He worked there for a little while while as a saddler after which having a knowledge of milling he entered into that business. After that he took up a farm at Newport near Cooranbong where he remained for about ten years and was very successfull. Leaving Newport he came to Newcastle where he resided alternatively with his sons Michael and John Moroney. In the year 1861 Mr. Moroneys wife died at Newport and her remains were buried at Cooranbong. 26 years afterwards the remains were re interred in the Sangate cemetery.


 
Item: 161634
Surname: Nowland (obit.,)
First Name: John James
Ship: -
Date: 10 April 1930
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: OBITUARY - The death has occurred after a long illness of Mr. John James Nowland, a member of one of the oldest families In New South Wales, and one who played a prominent part in open- ing up the New England and north-west dis- tricts. His great-grandfather. Michael Now- land, came to Australia with Governor Gidley King, the two being personal friends, and was appointed superintendent of convicts. A son, Mr. William Nowland, took up country near Armidale, and later the family owned a sta- tion on Liverpool Plains and the greater portion of Warrah Ridge. Mr. William Now- land was the first man to drive a vehicle over the Liverpool Range, a feat of no mean achievement in view of the fact that a track had to be cut for a great part of the way. After disposing of his interest in Warrah Ridge, Mr. J. J. Nowland followed pastoral pursuits in Queensland until he was over- taken by the illness which led to his death. In 1883 he married Miss Emily Smith, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Smith, of Dungog. Mrs. Nowland and four sons and three daughters survive.


 
Item: 174765
Surname: Nunn (obit.,)
First Name: Lieut-Col James Winniett (Major James Winniett)
Ship: -
Date: 2 February 1847
Place: Meerut
Source: Gentleman s Magazine
Details: Obituary - At Meerut, Lieut-Col James Winniett Nunn, of the 80th Foot. He entered the service as Ensign April 7 1804; was presented to a Lieutenancy 1805; to a Captaincy 1810; a brevet Majority 1830; and to a Lieut-Colonelcy 1844. He served with much distinction in Egypt, and was present at the capture of Genoa in 1814. His last services were with his regiment, the 80th Foot, during the Sutlej campaign.


 
Item: 161633
Surname: O'Gorman (obit.,)
First Name: Monsignor
Ship: -
Date: 20 November 1935
Place: West Maitland
Source: SMH
Details: Monsignor O'Gorman, parish priest at East Maitland since 1909, died this morning. He was 81 years of age, and was born at Kilkenny (Ireland), ordained at Rome in 1884, and arrived in Maitland 51 years ago. Except for three years at Barcaldine, in Queens- land, all his priesthood had been served in Maitland diocese. He had been stationed at Dungog and Newcastle


 
Item: 183772
Surname: Osmond (obit)
First Name: George
Ship: -
Date: 23 February 1932
Place: From Dungog
Source: The Richmond River Herald
Details: Mr. George Osmond, 92, one of the pioneers of Dungog district, who died last week, had lived for 80 years in the Paterson and Dungog districts. His father worked on Tocal Station, when wages were 1 pound per week and a hut to live in and it was whilst at Tocal that the deceased first learnt to ride. He was taught by that great horseman Frederick Ward, better known as Thunderbolt. Ward was a good master and he a good pupil. The late Mr. Osmond was noted as an expert horseman. Furthermore he would never hear a word said against Ward, who he always maintained was a good man. Subsequently deceased went on the land and then purchased a bullock team and commenced carrying provisions from Morpeth to the Western and North western towns. He married Fanny, the daughter of Timothy Taylor of Cox s creek who died 25 years previously. His father, aged 102 died in 1915


 
Item: 164115
Surname: Pender (obit.,)
First Name: John Wiltshire
Ship: -
Date: 14 March 1917
Place: West Maitland
Source: SMH
Details: The death of Mr. J.W. Pender of West Maitland was announced a few days ago. A quarter of a century since, when the Plymouth Rock fowls were first favourites with fanciers, Mr. Pender was one of the leading breeders and exhibitors. Many high class specimens were imported by him from England and America, the progeny usually securing honours at the Sydney and Melbourne shows


 
Item: 166543
Surname: Portus (obit.,)
First Name: John
Ship: -
Date: 19 June 1860
Place: Morpeth
Source: MM
Details: DEATH OF Mr. JOHN PORTUS. It would be difficult to name any person In our community whose loss would be more widely regretted and felt than Mr. Portus. Ever since we have known the district he has been one of Its most prominent men, for enterprise and ingenuity, united with prudent foresight. Such men as Mr. Portus invariably give a tone to society in their locality ; and it is not perhaps going too far to say, that the spirited enterprise for which the people of Morpeth have been long marked was largely due to the example and the encouragement of Mr. Portus. Very few of the greater enterprises undertaken In this district, such as the establishment of the two steam companies, have been started without being largely indebted to Mr. Portus for counsel and assistance, of a professional (engineering) character, freely rendered. The very complete milling facilities for which the Hunter district has long been distinguished, are also In great measure owing to Mr. Portus's enterprise in common with that of other gentle-men yet happily living amongst us. In another department of progress Mr. Portus has long materially helped the district. He was a remarkably ingenious mechanist and engineer, and his machine yard has supplied a great number of the improved farming implements, formerly scarce, but now rapidly increasing in use among our farmers. Latterly Mr. Portus's visit to Europe and the United States had enabled him to increase and vary this branch of his enterprise to an. extent that was only beginning to be appreciated. Mr. Portus's funeral, on Sunday afternoon, was attended by a very large number of persons ,thirty-two vehicles, a great number of horsemen, and very many on foot, following the hearse and mourning coaches to the cemetery, at Morpeth. We thought we observed a very marked gathering from all parts of the neighbourhood, many attending from great distances to pay the last sad honor to the memory of our fellow citizen...........


 
Item: 184470
Surname: Purves (obit)
First Name: Rev. William
Ship: -
Date: 6 August 1870
Place: -
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: It is with feelings of the deepest regret that we learn of the melancholy death of the Rev. William Purves, while on the voyage to Eng- land in the ship Patriarch. As yet there are very few particulars of the sad event to hand, but, we are informed, a gentleman in Maitland has received a telegram from the eldest son of the lamented gentleman, stating that his father was dead. It will be remembered that Mr. Purves was proceeding to the old country for the purpose of recruiting his health, which had given way under the pressure of domestic afflictions added to the wear and tear of his arduous calling. At the time the vessel left he was so unwell that he had to be assisted on board, but it was confidently hoped by his friends that the voyage would act as a restorative. The Patriarch was spoken by the ship Liberator, forty days out, and the report "all well" came on to Sydney, cheering the hearts of Mr. Purves numerous friends. The decease of Mr. Purves must then have happened at a subsequent period of the voyage, most probably ere he had time once more to see his native shores. There are few who have lived any length of time in this district who did not know and respect Mr. Purves, as well in his capacity of a citizen as in his sacred calling, and we are sure that the news of his decease will be received with great regret by all. Mr. Purves loss, coming so soon after the death of the Rev. W. McIntyre, will be the more la- mented. Of the two gentlemen, while both lent a helping hand to most movements for the public benefit in and about the two Maitlands, Mr. Purves took most part in movements out- side his own religious denomination. Himself a fine scholar, he took great delight in assisting such institutions as the Mechanics Institute, East Maitland : and did much towards making it and others really institutions for the whole- some recreation of all alike, poor and rich. At one time Mr. Purves tried to originate, and bring into active usefulness, movements for a scheme for crossing the river at West Maitland, and other plans of like nature, but was not then successful - partly perhaps because his style of public speaking, though easy, had more of the finished scholar than the orator in it, and he could thus create little enthusiasm among a mixed audience. He had a good deal of energetic perseverance in regard to more general matters also, and to him it is mainly owing (we believe) that the rich cannel coal-mine at Anvil Creek has been successfully brought into working condition, and maintained and largely owing that rather extensive flood-protection works, of drainage character, were entered on by the farmers and owners on Wallis Creek years since. Of Mr. Purves merits as a member of the Senate of the Sydney University the Sydney journals will be better informed than we are. By an accident some time ago we learnt that Mr. Purves(whose second marriage had made him rich was a man of most extensive- charities, some known, but many unknown but to himself and the recipients ; and in this respect, as well as in many others, his loss will be severely felt in East Maitland. It is almost unnecessary to add, so widely was Mr. Purves known, that he was a gentleman of the most courteous and obliging demeanour, by nature a peace- maker in nearly all cases.


 
Item: 162433
Surname: Radford (obit.,)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 1836 28 January
Place: -
Source: Colonist
Details: DEATH at Newcastle on Friday 15th instant - Dr. Radford arrived in the colony in the year 1824 on furlough from his Regiment in India, having married an English lady at Algoa Bay during his stay at the Cape. He obtained a grant at Hunter River but returned a year or two thereafter to India to complete his period of service. His two sons were on their way from India to the Australian College when they were both drowned in the unfortunate vessel that was lost on Amsterdam Island about 3 years ago. The melancholy tidings of this calamitous visitation preyed upon Dr. R's sensitive spirit, and the climate of India undermined his robust constitution, so that on coming to the colony, after having at length completed the regular period of service in India, he only came to spend the remainder of his days in sickness and to sink prematurely into the grave. Dr. R. died sincerely regretted by his numerous friends in NSW but we are happy to add he has left his widow and family in comparative independence


 
Item: 176061
Surname: Rourke (obit.,)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 5 August 1879
Place: Glanmore, Regent Street West Maitland
Source: MM
Details: Death of Mr. Henry Rourke. Many of our readers will join with us in strong regret that Mr. Rourke died yesterday at his residence, Glanmire, Regent Street, West Maitland. Mr. Rourke was one of our oldest residents. When the Mercurys first number was published in January, 1843, Mr. Rourke was in business in Maitland, and had been for some time. He was then, as he continued to be through life, a most industrious man in everything he undertook and with him, as with so many other Maitland business men, a life of constant industry, and quiet living, brought wealth in good time. Mr. Rourke also took his share in whatever public movements were about in those early days, his interest being shown more particularly in racing matters, in election contests, and so on.. From a very early period of his career, Mr. Rourke was an active member of the Hunter River Agricultural Association, and in later years was one of its mainstays, as treasurer and as member of committee, steward, and so on. A large share of the marked success that has latterly attended it, indeed, was due to Mr. Rourke and persevering men like him. At one time Mr. Rourke was one of the Aldermen of the borough, and he al-ways took a strong interest in politics, his views being


 
Item: 175704
Surname: Rouse (obit.,)
First Name: Henry
Ship: -
Date: 23 December 1897
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: Mr. Henry Rouse which took place at a quarter to 3 yesterday morning. The end was not, however, unexpected, for during recent months Mr. Rouse had suffered considerably from a complication of internal complaints, which had settled on his lungs. Drs. John Harris and J. B. Nash did all that medical skill could do, but they feared three months ago that this illness would be his last. The deceased wee a man of powerful constitution. Probably no man was better known in Newcastle, and certainly no one could have been more widely respected. He had no enemies. It was a pleasure to any old people to meet him, for he could talk of events of the past. and give days and dates for everything. It was on account of this that he was designated as the "encyclopaedia of Newcastle." He knew the day of the month and the year in which all his relatives (ae well ae many other people) wore born. He could recall any incident, however slight; he could describe life in Newcastle in the forties or fifties just as plainly as we see passing events of the present day; he could tell when every coal seam was opened out, and give the dates of all calamities such as shipwrecks and colliery disasters. He was in fact a perfect dictionary of dates. In the early days Mr. Rouse was a large shipowner, and resided in the house now owned by Mr. J. B. Wood. He subsequently went into an hotel in Perkin-street; but he is known to this generation chiefly as the proprietor of Rouses s Hotel, which occupied the spot where Mrs. Pearsons furniture warehouse now stands in Hunter street. He remained in this hotel for a number of years, but for a long time past he has lived the life of a retired gentleman -either at Dudley (where he owned a large estate), or at Hamilton. Mr Rouse was a very old member of the Masonic fraternity. He was 67 years of age at the time of his death, having been born on13th June, 1830, at the spot where Fields butchers shop now stands in Watt street. He was married to a sister of Mr. Clarence H. Hannell, and was thus related by marriage to Mrs. Joseph Wood, Mrs. W. F. James, Mrs. F. Clack, Mr. James Hannell, and Mr Arthur Hannell. The following members of the Rouse family remains to mourn their loss : Mr. William Rouse, Mr.Harry Rouse; Mrs. F. W. Clarke (of Merewether), Mrs. Andrew Nash, .Mrs. Harry Lesten , and Mrs. Joseph Gorrick. The two latter ladies came up from Sydney last evening. It is a somewhat remarkable coincidence that any deaths that have occurred in the Rouse -Hannell family have taken place In December, and always close to Christmas Day. The funeral will take place this afternoon.


 
Item: 167497
Surname: Rusden (obit.,)
First Name: Rev. George Keylock
Ship: -
Date: 26 March 1859
Place: East Maitland
Source: MM
Details: Death of THE REV G.K. RUSDEN- Many of our readers will learn with sincere sorrow the death yesterday of the Rev Mr Rusden so long the clergyman (Church ot England) of East Maitland We are not aware of the exact period when Mr Rusden first commenced his ministerial duties in this district but he was we believe the second oldest of the ministers on the Hunter the Rev Wilton of Newcastle, being the first. Mr Rusden was very much loved by his own congregation and was greatly respected and esteemed by we believe all denominations particularly in East Maitland. He was a man of considerable ability and acquirements and has largely helped in forwarding many public movements of a character that he considered fairly within his province-for his name was scarcely ever heard of in connection with political matter, or similar subjects. For some few years past Mr Rusdens strength has obviously been failing but it is some proof of ins still vigorous mental ability that it is but a few months since he addressed at some length the members of the Maitland Mechanics Institute of which he was the first president. Lately his strength has more rapidly given way and on Sunday last he was unable to complete the morning service at St Peters East Maitland from weakness and told the congregation that he should be unable to perform service again . We may add that tor some little time past Mr Rusden s duties have been lightened by the Bishop of Newcastle and tho Rev Mr. Thackeray assisting him in some of them


 
Item: 163867
Surname: Russell (obit.,)
First Name: Captain Bourn
Ship: -
Date: 6 July 1880
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: The hon. Bourn Russell, who has just passed from amongst us, at the ripe age of 85, was born at Rye, in the South of England, on 1st December, 1794. In early life he received a good education, but while very young, his father, Bourn Russell, was killed at sea, while in command of a sailing vessel. His grand- father was also killed at sea, while in command of a vessel, carrying despatches at the siege of Gibraltar. Coming of such a stock, it is not surprising that Mr. Russell early resolved to follow a seafaring life, and by the time he was 21 years of age he was in command of a vessel. Soon afterwards he became captain of a vessel trading to China and the South Seas. Of this vessel he was tempted to become part owner ; and for this purpose sold the family property, which had come to him as the only son. While amongst the islands of the Pacific he made several surveys of (then) little known places, and published a map in Sydney which was much used at the time. When he was about 30 years of age he was induced, like many energetic men of the time, to engage in whale-fishing, and made several voyages from Sydney for that purpose. In these he made a considerable sum of money, and determined to settle in this colony, which he had first visited in 1826. His family, consisting of Mrs. Russell, three sons, and two daughters, came to the colony in 1834. Mr. Russell, the astronomer, and one other son were born after the family settled at Maitland in 1835. In Maitland Mr. Russell began a general business and rapidly accumulated money and some station property; but in 1842, during the great crisis in this colony, his name was found on so much of the paper of a Sydney firm, that all he had acquired was lost. Thrown thus on his own energy, he made a start again, and succeeded in making a moderate competency. Throughout his residence in Maitland, he was identified with every movement having the wel fare of the district in view, and for many years sat upon the bench there. From the first general election in 1843, he always took an active part in politics. About 1856 he contested the Maitland electorate with Mr. (now the Honorable) E. C. Weekes, but was not successful. Soon after, however, he was nominated to a seat in the Upper House, and has always taken an active part in its deliberations. This session he has several times attended, but finding the infirmities of age creeping upon him, he obtained leave of absence. Although getting gradually weaker, there were no symptoms to indicate that his end was near until Saturday morning. Even then he rallied again, and his medical attendant thought him decidedly better in the afternoon, and the danger seemed past. About 11 p.m., however, the unfavourable symptoms returned. Yet he was still able to walk about his room and converse with his daughter, and, getting some relief from the pain, laid himself down to sleep, asking at a quarter past 12 what time it was. He then seemed to go to sleep, and quietly breathed his last


 
Item: 176130
Surname: Sadleir (Obit.,)
First Name: Lieutenant Richard
Ship: -
Date: 7 March 1889
Place: Liverpool
Source: Evening News
Details: DEATH OF COMMANDER, SADLEIR, R.N. At 2.30 p.in. yesterday, the last breath of life left the body of Commander Richard Sadleir, the inevitable fate overtaking the venerable gentleman at his residence, Macquarie-street ,Liverpool. He had reached the great age of 95years; and from the extraordinary vitality and retention of his intellectual faculties, until very recently, seemed to bid fair to become a centenarian. He was quite hale and hearty until some seven months ago, when he slipped from a doorstep, injuring his hip. This prostrated. Him a great deal, and his relatives believe the accident was responsible -in hastening his end.? Commander, or as he was better- known, Captain- Sadlier, was born on May 6, 1794, near Cork, Ireland, he being the son of a clergyman of the Church of England. He joined the British Royal. Navy as midshipman at the age of 14, remaining in nautical pursuits for twenty-one years, and reaching the grade he held until his death. During his maritime career he passed through some stirring scenes, and though not engaged in any actual naval battles, was in dangerous work, such as. cutting out vessels, &e., on many occasions. Sixty years ago he made New South Wales his home, about his last service at sea being to bring a shipload of emigrants to these shores. Almost is earliest - avocation on shore was to undertake mission -to the aborigines, after which he was engaged in various humane duties until appointed by Government to the charge of the Boys Orphan School (now Bonnyrigg Farm), near Liverpool. He remained there for many years, and most of his family of five were born there, he having -taken to wife Miss Cartwright, daughter of. the then incumbent of the Church of England at Liverpool. Of these five children but two remain alive, viz., Mr. Robert Sadleir, of Liverpool, and Mrs. Eames, of Sydney. Some . years of Captain Sadleir s subsequent life were spent in Liverpool, and on the Hunter. For the Hunter electorate he was returned member of Parliament, and worked very hard in connection with the famous Education Act introduced by Mr.(now Sir Henry) Parkes. Returning to Liverpool, he purchased the pretty estate now widely known as Warwick Farm Racecourse, residing there for four years. The tremendous and disastrous flood of eighteen years ago, caused him tore-sell this property, and he made his home in Liverpool once more. He was one of the oldest magistrates in the colony, and very carefully attended to administration of justice in that district, practice which he carefully and- honorably followed until within seven months of his death. Sixteen years ago he interested himself strongly in the formation of the Municipality of Liverpool, and, on his efforts being successful, he was elected alderman, then Mayor (the first ever elected there), while most of his colleagues in council have long since gone over to the great majority CommanderSadleir was one of the first movers toward the formation of that valuable Institution, the Sydney Bethel, and his name remained on the books until his death. When very ill, seven years ago, he resigned, but the other members of the executive refused to take his name from the books.- He was tireless in laboring for any movement for the good of his fellow man, and brought the resources of a determined will, clear intellect, keen wit, readi ness of repartee, and a ready pen to his work. Surrounded by his children and grandchildren he passed away into the great unknown serenely and peaceable, keeping his senses until a very few minutes before the end. By their deeds shall ye know them, and the departing benefactor of his race had no dread of the future from his past deeds. He was buried in the Church of England Cemetery, Liverpool, today.


 
Item: 168870
Surname: Scott (obit.,)
First Name: Captain David Charles Frederick
Ship: -
Date: 19 May 1881
Place: -
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: We have to chronicle the death of Captain Scott, which occurred on May 16, who had held the position of Police Magistrate at the Central Police Court for about a quarter of a century. Mr David Charles Frederick Scott was first appointed under the colonial Government on the 27th February, 1849. He was commissioned as a magistrate of the Metropolitan Police Court on the 13th July, 1860. and although five years have elapsed since he did active duty, ho retained that appointment until the time of his death. About five years ago, in consequence of failing health, he relinquished magisterial work, being granted sick leave. Deceased was born in Scotland. He married a daughter of the late Colonel Barney, R.E. Both Mr. Scott and his estimable wife displayed much zeal in connection with the establishment of the Lisgar Protestant Orphan School. Mr. Scott was also instrumental in initiating a poor-box, which was erected at the Central Police Court. Deceased was of a very benevolent and urbane disposition, and was always ready to afford assistance to persons who were in want of it.


 
Item: 161724
Surname: Scott (obit.,)
First Name: Helenus
Ship: -
Date: 26 August 1879
Place: -
Source: MM
Details: DEATH OF MB, HELENTJS SCOTT, J.P.-At a late hour last night, we received information of the decease of Mr. Helenus Scott, J.P., of this city, The deceased gentleman had reached the ripe old age of seventy-seven years, and expired at his residence half-past 6 o'clock yesterday evening. Prior to his retirement, about eighteen months past, Mr. Scott had occupied the position of Police Magistrate at Newcastle, when he obtained leave of absence



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