Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

Search


First Name



Surname / Subject



Ship








Search Results



<<  Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  >>
 
Item: 178374
Surname: Hobbs (obit.,)
First Name: William
Ship: -
Date: 14 April 1871
Place: Wollongong
Source: Illawarra Mercury
Details: Death of Mr. William Hobbs. We regret to have to record the decease of Mr. William Hobbs, who, for the past five years and a half, occupied the position of Governor of the Gaol in this town. For a considerable time past Mr. Hobbs was in a failing state of health, (we believe from an affection of the heart and liver), and about six months ago he obtained a month s leave of absence, and visited some other parts of the colony, but experienced little benefit from the change. Latterly it became painfully evident that he was gradually sinking, and on Sunday, the 2nd instant, his illness assumed an alarming aspect, and Dr. Morton then pronounced that all hopes of his recovery were at an end. He lingered, however, under much pain, until Friday night last, when a violent attack of his disease again came on, and death put an end to his suffering about half-past two o clock on Saturday morning. The deceased occupied the position of Chief Constable in the Northern districts for many years, and for two or three years prior to his appointment to Wollongong, he was Governor of the Gaol at Windsor. Mr. Hobbs was very much and deservedly respected by all who knew him. In a sentence, he was a most efficient and assiduous officer, an affectionate husband and father, and an unobtrusive and esteemed member of society. He leaves behind him a widow and a. large and respectable family (several of whom are comparatively young), to deplore their loss. The remains of the deceased were interred in the Church of England Burial-ground last Sabbath, having first been taken into the Church. The Rev. Dean Ewing conducted the service, and a large number of the inhabitants paid their last respects to the departed by following his remains to their final resting-place.


 
Item: 161636
Surname: Hogue (obit.,)
First Name: Mrs. Isabella Sophia
Ship: -
Date: 22 January 1929
Place: Vaucluse
Source: SMH
Details: OBITUARY. MRS. I. S. HOGUE. Mrs. Isabella Sophia Hogue, who died at the residence of her daughter (Mrs. E. Horler), at Vaucluse last week, was an old resident of the Newcastle district. A daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. Hancock, she was born 68 years ago at Dungog. Her husband, Mr. John Hogue, died 11 years ago. He was employed In the railway workshops at Newcastle. She leaves two sons (Messrs. J. F. and T. W. Hogue) and two daughtcrs (Mesdames S. Harper and E. Horler). Cannon 0. C. J. Van officiated at the graveside, in the Presbyterian portion of the Sandgate Cemetery. The mourners Included Messrs. F. Hancock, H. Hancock, and O. Hancock (brothers), Mesdames G. Gorton, \V. Fitness, and O. Irwin (sisters), Messrs. J. F. and T. W. Hogue, Mesdames S, Harper and E. Horler, and Messrs. S. Harper and E. Horler (sons in-law)


 
Item: 161638
Surname: Hooke (nee Mackay) (obit.,)
First Name: Mrs. Sybella Jane
Ship: -
Date: 14 May 1941
Place: Dungog
Source: SMH
Details: OBITUARY. MRS. SYBELLA HOOKE. Mrs Sybella Jane Hooke, who died at Dungog recently, at the age of 86 had lived in the district since 1855. She was the widow of Mr Frederlrk Augustus Hooke whom she married in 1874. Both she and her husband were members of pioneering families. Mrs Hooke's father was the late Mr. George Mackay who settled in Australia with his parents in 1833. He became leader of the Clan Mackay in Scotland a few years later but did not leave Australia to assume the title.


 
Item: 188922
Surname: Hughes (obit)
First Name: William Edmund
Ship: -
Date: 8 March 1934
Place: Branxton
Source: Maitland Daily Mercury
Details: The oldest pioneer of the Branxton district, Mr. William Edmund Hughes, of McMullen s road, East Branxton, celebrated the 90th anniversary of his birth day on Monday. Mr. Hughes was born at West Maitland on March 5, 1841, at. a place located where Hart s jewellery shop now stands. At the time his father, who was a native of Wales, was a pilot on one of the boats at Newcastle. When Mr. Edmund was four months old his parents moved to Branxton, where his father became keeper of the Don O Connell Public House and since then Mr. Hughes has not been away from this locality for more than twelve months. He attended school first in Maitland under the tuition of a schoolmaster named Mr Dunne, and later a private school situated in those days on the site of the present resldence of Mr. C. Edmonds, sen., at East Branxton. At the age of 14 years Mr. Hughes started as a carrier, chiefly drawing produce from the northern towns to be loaded on the boats at Morpeth, and taking other necessaries back to these towns, travelling per bullock team as far west as Dubbo from Maitland


 
Item: 170511
Surname: Hungerford (obit)
First Name: Robert
Ship: -
Date: 27 March 1897
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Weekly Mercury
Details: Obituary of Robert R. Hungerford of Bush Villa near Owlpen not far from Maitland. Husband of Ellen nee Winder. Son of Emanual Hungerford who was the original proprietor of Farley Estate. He was a brother of Mrs. Chapman wife of Rev. Robert Chapman and a brother of Septimus, Thomas and Percy Hungerford


 
Item: 162217
Surname: Kealy (obit.,)
First Name: Edward
Ship: -
Date: 23 July 1867
Place: Upper Paterson
Source: MM
Details: On Thursday night last our respected neighbour, Mr Fdward Kealy, sen , of Summer Hill Paterson River, died suddenly, at his residence, at the advanced age of seventy years. 'The funeral took place on Sunday, three p.m ,the attendance being the largest we have ever witnessed in a. similar occasion in a country district, numbering upwards of three hundred persons and proving the great estimation of the worthy man of all who knew him. The remains were carried to the churchy yard on the property, the pall-bearers being E.G. Cory ,warden of the district; Mr. Nowlan, ' M.P. ; Messrs. James M'Cormack, and G. J. Frankland, J.P.s ; and Messrs. E. Doyle and W. Corner. Owing to the day, it was impossible to procure the services of a clergyman ;but the burial service of the Roman Catholic Church was read in a most appropriate manner by Mr. Stapleton after which Mr, Knowlan addressed a few remarks to those present, bearing testimony to the high character and moral worth of the deceased, who in every relation of life had discharged his duty in the most praiseworthy manner.Mr. Cory also, from an experience of over forty years, testified to the sterling character of the late Mr. Kealy, particularly dwelling upon the good qualities as a neighbour and friend. Mr. Kealy's loss will be much felt in this district, where he was deservedly respected and beloved. - Upper Paterson July, 16..


 
Item: 184783
Surname: Kelly (obit)
First Name: Philip (Phillip)
Ship: -
Date: 19 August 1902
Place: Singleton
Source: Singleton Argus
Details: On Saturday morning, Mr Philip Kelly expired at his residence, in Bathurst-street, at the advanced age of 85 years. De- ceased was a native of London, but had lived in this district for about 60 years, and was much respected by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and family of seven sons and two daughters. All these are living in the State, and the wife and one son lived with deceased up to the time of his death, which was peaceful and resembled the gentle flickering out of Life s brief candle. Of late years deceased s sight had failed him, so that blindness was added to the other afflictions that are borne in the train of age. The deceased s residence in the district having been so long, his reminiscences connected there with were very interesting. He was a close student of the problems and questions of his time, and possessed a quaint and descriptive turn of philosophy. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery yesterday forenoon


 
Item: 25622
Surname: Kemp (obit.,)
First Name: Charles
Ship: -
Date: 16 September 1864
Place: Sydney
Source: Illustrated Sydney News
Details: THE LATE MR. CHARLES KEMP. A DEEP feeling of regret has been occasioned in this city by the death of Mr. Charles Kemp, for many years a partner in the proprietary of the Sydney Morning Herald. For some time past he had been suffering from disease of the heart, which terminated fatally on the, 25th of August. Mr. Kemp was an Englishman by birth ; he emigrated to this Colony with his parents in 1825. Shortly after attaining his majority, Mr. Kemp be- came a contributor to the Sydney Monitor, and in a few months accepted a permanent engagement on that journal ; he afterwards joined the reporting staff of the Sydney Morning Herald, and continued in that vocation until 1841, when he joined Mr. John Fairfax in purchasing the paper from Messrs. Stokes and Stephens. Mr. Kemp proved fully equal to his new position : his business habits, kind dis- position, and thorough honesty, gained him the respect and goodwill of all with whom he came in contact. In 1853, Mr. Kemp, having realised an independence, 'disposed of his interest in the Herald, and since that time has been more prominently before the public. For several years he discharged the duties of a magistrate with the most thorough impartiality, and in 1860 he was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly for Liverpool Plains, but lost his seat at the ensuing general elections, chiefly owing to his refusal to disguise his real opinions, or promise to stultify his- judgment by adopting the popular cry, and was soon after ap- pointed to a seat in the Legislative Council, which he held up to the time of his death. As a private citizen he devoted much of his time in developing the resources of the Colony ; he was, for several years chairman of the directory of the Australian Steam Navigation Company, and, on his retirement from that office, received a very hand- some testimonial in acknowledgment of his ser- vices; he was also a director of several other Iocal commercial institutions, and a fellow of St. John's College. He was warmly attached to the Church of England, and his munificent contributions to the cause of religion were only equalled by his un- ostentatious acts of benevolence; the claims of poverty never appealed to his sympathy in vain. In a leading article in the Sydney Morning Herald his former partner, Mr. John Fairfax, thus bears testimony to his worth:-"The name of Charles Kemp will be mentioned amongst us with lasting veneration. Affectionate in family life-upright in business-incapable of anything tortuous or mean liberal in the employment of his wealth-firm in his friendships as in his convictions-active in the promotion of all that was beneficent ;-such h was. A good man has fallen. Alas! one of our was. A good man has fallen. Alas! one of our best, kindest, most useful citizens has passed away for ever. " Mr. Kemp was buried in tbe Church of England cemetery, atFix this text Newtown; his remains were followed to their last resting place by a very large number of the principal inhabitants of this city, and by many of his former employs, by whom he was deeply and deservedly regretted.


 
Item: 168822
Surname: Kemp (obit.,)
First Name: Simon
Ship: -
Date: 21 February 1867
Place: Newcastle
Source: SMH
Details: Simon Kemp, father of the late Mr. Charles Kemp, a very old and respected resident died at Newcastle on Tuesday last. He was mayor during the past year and his term of office expired within a few minutes of his death. His funeral took place on the 7th instant


 
Item: 164653
Surname: Kimmorley (obit.,)
First Name: Mrs. James
Ship: -
Date: 19 November 1930
Place: Winton Station
Source: The Brisbane Courier
Details: Obituary - The death of Mrs. James Kimmorley, sen., relict of the late James Kimmorley, of Winton Station, occurred on November 12. For fifty years Mrs.Kimmorley had been a resident of the Goondiwindi district. The late Mrs. Kimmorley was a member of the Judge family of the Hunter River district, and was a native of Dalwood. She married in 1874 and with Mr. Kimmorley went from Inverell to Winton Station, where, until a few years ago, she had since resided. Her husband predeceased her in 1924. Of the family of seven sons and one daughter two sons died several years ago in West Australia


 
Item: 167444
Surname: King (obit.,) (Irrawang)
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 1 March 1858
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: THE LATE JAMES KING, Esq..-It was with great regret that in a late number we noticed the death in England of Mr. King, late of Irrawang, New South Wales. Since then we have received a mourning card, which seems to have been addressed to his fellow colonists in England, bearing the following inscription : -" In memory of James King, Esq., of Irrawang, New South Wales. Died 29th November, 1857. Aged60. 31, Blandford-square, London." Mr. King was an old colonist, and in every relation of life-social, moral, or political, deservedly esteemed and respected. Within his own immediate sphere he was more than this, he was beloved ; and his death, though not unexpected, will be sincerely and extensively lamented. Unobtrusive in habits and manners, Mr. King did not enter largely into the strife of public life, but not the less earnestly did he devote his time, talents, and patient industry to the development of the resources of his adopted country. Mr. King possessed a highly searching and acquisitive mind, but the knowledge he stored up he did not allow to lie idle. Practically he applied it to the encouragement of the pursuits for which he thought the soil and climate of this colony were suited, and for many years past his name has been associated with all that has been useful and successful in vineyard cultivation. The wines of Irrawang have established a name and fame second to none in Australia, and we are happy to say that under the present management of the vineyard their prestige has not failed. Mr. King was a frequent and very intelligent correspondent of the Sydney Press, on the subject of vine growing and wine making, and his papers to different societies on these are valuable. His name is one of those which will deserve a grate-fel remembrance in the hearts of posterity, as one of those colonists who, while doing incalculable service to his adopted country, by his life and deportment, drew around him and obtained the deserved affections of his fellow men.


 
Item: 163354
Surname: Last (obit.,)
First Name: Major-General Edward
Ship: -
Date: 19 February 1870
Place: -
Source: Launceston Examiner (TAS)
Details: The Death is announced of Major-General Edward Last, a New Zealand veteran, and formerly Lieut-Col of the 21st Foot (North British Fusiliers) During the outbreak in New Zealand in 1846, Major Last commanded the Southern district and was present at the engagement at Bulcott's Farm, valley of the Hutt, in May 1846; he commanded at the capture of the rebel leader, To Rauparaha, and other influential chiefs, and the disarming of their followers in July of the same year, and also at the affair of the Horokiwi, on August 6, when the rebels were routed and ultimately dispersed. General Last was appointed to the 21st Foot in 1857 but retired soon afterwards on full pay


 
Item: 165299
Surname: Lethbridge (obit.,)
First Name: George Langworthy
Ship: -
Date: 31 May 1917
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: An old Singleton identity in the person of Mr. George Langworthy Lethbridge passed away recently when within a few weeks of his 90th birthday. The deceased was a son of Captain Robert Lethbridge, R.N., who was given a grant of land by Governor Bourke for his conduct in saving the Governor's despatches when his ship was burnt at sea in 1821. The late Mr. Lethbridge was born at Parramatta in 1827, and was educated at The King's School, and in England. After his return from England he was occupied on his father's estate at Bridgman, near Singleton, and a little later went to manage a cattle station of his father's on the Horton River, near Barraba. Here he resided for no less than 30 years, living for the most part in a small bark-covered hut. When the cattle station was sold he returned to Bridgman, where he lived for over 40 years. During the period of his life at the cattle station, which was known as Currangandi, Mr. Lethbridge took part in an interesting expedition of exploration. The party, which included Mr. Kelman, of Kirkton, Mr. William Carter, of Goorangoola, and two aborigines, started on February 14, 1854. They went as far as Peake Range, being the third party out after Leichhardt, the great explorer. The second party -- Hedley Mitchell's - was killed by blacks; and Mr. Lethbridge's party got Mitchell's horses and brought them in. They returned about the middle of August, having been out six months from day of starting. A lot of country was taken up on the head of Palm Tree Creek, a tributary of the Dawson, with more country on the Dawson and Mackenzie rivers. On the eastern side of the Peake Range a beautiful bit of Downs country, with plenty of water, fell to the lot of Mr. Lethbridge, and to this day is called Lethbridge's Pocket. Mr. Lethbridge was a noted breeder of stock while at Bridgman, and was for many years a member of the Northern Agricultural Association. He was a noted authority on sheep. He took a keen interest in local affairs, and had been for many years the oldest J.P. in the district. The fact that a driving accident had crippled him many years ago did not prevent him regularly being present at the committee meeting of the Agricultural Association, and attending other duties. He took a lively interest in public matters up to within a few months of his death, which occurred at a private hospital in Singleton. The funeral took place at Bridgman, the burial service being conducted by Archdeacon Tollis, of East Maitland, and the Rev. C. N. Mell, of Singleton.


 
Item: 184763
Surname: Lewis (obit)
First Name: Morimer W
Ship: -
Date: 14 January 1899
Place: Kogarah
Source: The Maitland Weekly Mercury
Details: The late Mr Mortimer W. Lewis, who died at Kogarah on Saturday last at the age of 78, was born at Regents Park, London, in 1820, and was amongst the oldest residents of the colony, having come out in tho year 1830 with his father, who was one of the Royal military surveyors appointed by the Earl of Mulgrave in 1811, afterwards first town survevor of Sydney and Colonial Architect. Mr. Lewis was appointed in 1835 at tbe age of 14 to the Royal Engineers Department, under the late Colonel George Barney. In 1837 he received an appointment in the Surveyor General s Department, under the late Colonel Sir T. L. Mitchell, and in 1843 was appointed to the Colonial Architects Department, where he served until his retirement on a well-earned pension in 1891, after a faithful service of 56 years, 54 years of which were spent in the colonial service and two years in the Im perial service. In the Colonial Architect s Depart ment Mr. Lewia was in charge of the northern district from Cooranbong to Newcastle, Tenterfield, Narrabri, and Walgett, in the days that travelling had to be done on horseback or coach, before the railways came ioto operation, and all the principal Government buildings then in the northern district were designed and carried out under his supervision, as well as the Banks of Australasia at New castle and East Maitland, St. John s Roman Catholic Church at West Maitland, now the Cathedral, and many others, the latter buildings having been erected at the time public officers were allowed to do private work. Part of the Newcastle Breakwater was also carried out under his supervision.


 
Item: 184764
Surname: Lewis (obit)
First Name: Mortimer William (junior)
Ship: -
Date: 14 January 1899
Place: Kogarah
Source: The Maitland Weekly Mercury
Details: The late Mr Mortimer W. Lewis, who died at Kogarah on Saturday last at the age of 78, was born at Regents Park, London, in 1820, and was amongst the oldest residents of the colony, having come out in the year 1830 with his father, who was one of the Royal military surveyors appointed by the Earl of Mulgrave in 1811, afterwards first town surveyor of Sydney and Colonial Architect. Mr. Lewis was appointed in 1835 at the age of 14 to the Royal Engineers Department, under the late Colonel George Barney. In 1837 he received an appointment in the Surveyor General s Department, under the late Colonel Sir T. L. Mitchell, and in 1843 was appointed to the Colonial Architects Department, where he served until his retirement on a well-earned pension in 1891, after a faithful service of 56 years, 54 years of which were spent in the colonial service and two years in the Imperial service. In the Colonial Architect s Department Mr. Lewis was in charge of the northern district from Cooranbong to Newcastle, Tenterfield, Narrabri, and Walgett, in the days that travelling had to be done on horseback or coach, before the railways came into operation, and all the principal Government buildings then in the northern district were designed and carried out under his supervision, as well as the Banks of Australasia at New castle and East Maitland, St. John s Roman Catholic Church at West Maitland, now the Cathedral, and many others, the latter buildings having been erected at the time public officers were allowed to do private work. Part of the Newcastle Breakwater was also carried out under his supervision.


 
Item: 162253
Surname: Lewis (obit.,)
First Name: Mortimer William
Ship: -
Date: 27 March 1879
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: Obituary - Mr. M.W. Lewis, The late Mr. Mortimer William Lewis, whose death we recorded in a recent issue, commenced his professional life at an early age. On the 19th November 1811 he was appointed by the Master General of Ordnance to the position of cadet surveyor and draftsman, and after a course of instruction extending over three years in mathematics, military surveying and plan drawing, fortification, and the construction of buildings bridges etc. he passed a satisfactory examination before a Board of officers. Soon afterwards he was appointed to the corps of Royal Military Surveyors and Draftsmen. Not long afterwards a surveyor and draftsman being required at the office of the Inspector General of Fortifications , Head Quarters, he was selected, though a junior, as a fit and proper person for the duties of the position, which were important and partly confidential, consisting principally of taking charge of the plans and correspondence relating thereto, as received from all parts of the world where Engineer officers were stationed. He had to make copies of the most important plans and documents, in order to make himself thoroughly acquainted with their substance, so that he might be able to explain instantly any question relative to the different subjects as the Inspector General might require the information. He remained in this position more than seven years, giving entire satisfaction to his superior officers and acquiring that experience and general information in his profession which proved so valuable to him afterwards. His health, however, suffered so much from the close confinement and hard work that he deemed it advisable to retire for a time upon half pay, and for the succeeding eight years he was occupied in private surveying and building. Whilst thus engaged he received intimation from Colonel Wedderburn, secretary to Sir George Murray, that if he would accept an appointment as a surveyor in New South Wales the situation was at his service. After a few days consideration, and wishing for a change of scene, he obtained leave from the Ordnance department, and accepted the appointment, arriving in the colony in March 1830. Under the orders of the Surveyor General Sir Thomas Mitchell, he proceeded at once into the interior to survey the main dividing range between the eastern and western watershed. He was engaged in this work for upwards of two years, and obtained the express approval of the Surveyor General for the manner in which he performed his work. Sir Richard Bourke having heard of his former employment in the Ordnance Department appointed Mr. Lewis as the first Town Survey for Sydney, and afterwards made him Colonial Architect. His efforts in this position earned him the express approval of Sir Richard Bourke, Sir George Gipps, Sir Charles Fitzroy, and the then Colonial Secretaries. Among the public buildings erected by him may be mentioned the Court House and goal, Darlinghurst, The Colonial Treasury, Custom House and Government House, Sydney. He also designed the Court houses and gaols at Newcastle, Maitland, Muswellbrook, Parramatta, Berrima etc and also the Lunatic Asylum, Gladesville and several churches and private buildings. He also carried out the alteration of the old building in Macquarie Street into the first Parliament House and the conversion of the old Military Hospital into the first National School. With the Hon. Sir E. Deas Thomson, he surveyed and laid out the Racecourse at Randwick. He was acting Colonial Engineer and had to attend to harbour and river works and had the roads and bridges of the colony under his control in addition to the duties pertaining to the office of Colonial Architect. For some years past Mr. Lewis has led a strictly private life, surrounded by his children, grandchildren, and a large circle of friends to whom he had endeared himself by his many amiable qualities, and by whom his memory will be long revered.


 
Item: 162431
Surname: Lindeman (obit.,)
First Name: Dr. Henry John
Ship: -
Date: 3 June 1881
Place: Cawarra, Gresford
Source: SMH
Details: DR. LINDEMAN.Dr. Lindeman, of Cawarra, Gresford, died on the 26th May, in his seventieth year. The memory of the deceased will be cherished by many friends on personal grounds ; but it has also a special claim on public respect. Dr. Lindeman was one of the pioneers of our wine-making enterprise, and took a chief part in winning for the vintages of the Hunter valley a reputation extending beyond the boundaries of the colony, and indeed of Australia itself. As far back as 1867 his wines gained an award of merit from the judges at the Paris Exposition, an authority beyond dispute. But long before that he had, as a leading member of the Hunter River Vineyard Association, been one of a knot of enthusiastic vignerons whose determination it was to aim at the highest standard of purity and excellence rather than to seek immediate profit by pandering to corrupted tastes, and whose intercourse and emulation un- questionably led to good results. Of these, Mr. King, of Irrawang, Mr. Windeyer, of Kinross, Dr. Carmichael, of Porphyry, passed away some years ago.


 
Item: 183774
Surname: Lloyd (obit)
First Name: John
Ship: -
Date: 20 June 1902
Place: Dungog
Source: Dungog Chronicle
Details: Last morning a veteran pioneer of Dungog passed over to the great majority, in tbe person of Mr John Lloyd, for many years honorably es-teemed aa a resident of the northern rivers district. The death of Mr Lloyd was far from being unexpected, his life having, as a matter of fact, lingered in the balance that divides the known from tbe mighty unknown for several years. Of course hope struggled against hope in the affect- tions of his devoted family, but con- sidering that he outlined the span of life, being in his 84th year, his demise was only to be looked for, in the natural order of things. The late Mr Lloyd had been a resident of the Dungog district for over half a century, having come here from the Paterson River for the purpose of establishing a tobacco manufacturing business, which be conducted with considerable success, until the imposition of a heavy excise duty caused him to relinquish the venture, and seek for other avenues if investment. In Dungog he was very successful and enjoyed an excellent name for probity, straight forwardness, and honest dealing. Together with a few others, he was instrumental in estab- lishing the local School of Arts, and was a valued member of the committee of that institution for many years.


 
Item: 177585
Surname: Mackay (nee Hooke) (obit.,)
First Name: Mrs. Emily
Ship: -
Date: 16 May 1919
Place: Cangon, Dungog
Source: The Voice of the North
Details: Relict of the late J.K. Mackay and was born in the Dungog district. Said to be the first while child born in the locality.


 
Item: 183757
Surname: Mackie (obit.,)
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 13 August 1934
Place: Newcastle
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: James Mackie, founder of the Newcastle furniture firm of J. Mackie and Co., Ltd., died on Friday at his home at Waratah. Mr. Mackie was born at Ballarat (Vic.) in 1853. He went to Sydney as a young man, and estab- lished his business in Newcastle in 1897. He led the movement for the earlier closing of retail shops in the Newcastle district. At a time when some shops were staying open till as late as 11 p.m. He adopted the 6 p.m. closing time for his own business about twelve months before the State Government brought early closing legislation into force. Mr. Mackie was a prominent Freemason and a keen bowler. Patron of the Newcastle District Bowling As- sociation and of the Muswellbrook Bowling Club, he was also president of the Waratah Bowling Club for some years. Mrs. Mackie, three sons, and eight daughters survive him. The funeral took place to Sandgate Cemetery yesterday.



<<  Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  >>