Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 68383
Surname: Robinson
First Name: James
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1828
Place: Wallis Plains
Source: 1828 Census
Details: Free by servitude. Labourer aged 43 employed by J.S. McDonough


 
Item: 133547
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1837
Place: Newcastle
Source: GRC
Details: Age 57. Assigned to the A.A. company


 
Item: 170282
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters. Class: HO 10; Piece: 20
Details: Assigned to Mr. Brooks at Newcastle


 
Item: 178267
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1822
Place: Liverpool
Source: 1822 Muster
Details: Prisoner for life. Employed as a constable at Liverpool


 
Item: 178268
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: May 1835
Place: -
Source: Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia, Convict Pardons and Tickets of Leave, 1834-1859
Details: Tried in Dublin November 1818 and sentenced to transportation for life. Granted Conditional Pardon


 
Item: 178269
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1820
Place: -
Source: Original data: New South Wales Government. Musters and other papers relating to convict ships. Series CGS 1155, Reels 2417-2428. State Records NSW. Ancestry.
Details: Age 40. Tried November 1818 Co. Dublin. Sentenced to transportation for life for horse stealing.


 
Item: 178270
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 11 February 1842
Place: Liverpool
Source: Ticket of leave butts
Details: Granted ticket of leave for district of Liverpool


 
Item: 178271
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1832
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: Gaol Description Book. State Archives NSW; Roll: 137
Details: Born c. 1777. 5ft 7 in, stout build, fresh complexion, brown to grey hair, blue eyes. Convicted at the Maitland Quarter Sessions


 
Item: 178272
Surname: SMith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 10 January 1827
Place: Sydney Gaol
Source: Sydney Gaol Entrance. State Archives NSW; Roll: 850 Ancestry
Details: Admitted to Sydney Gaol. Sentenced to an iron gang.


 
Item: 178273
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 25 August 1823
Place: Newcastle district
Source: Colonial Secretarys Correspondence
Details: One of six convict servants assigned to Alexander Shand. To be victualled from the Stores at Newcastle for 6 months


 
Item: 181242
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 19 August 1824
Place: Newcastle
Source: Colonial Secretarys Papers. Special Bundles 1794 - 1825
Details: Henry Smith per Almorah convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to six months in gaol


 
Item: 181243
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 26 August 1824
Place: ?
Source: SG
Details: Henry Smith was indicted for manslaughter in having discharged a blunderbuss, loaded with slugs among some standing maize and shooting one John Printz whereof he died on the 11th May last. Guilty. Remanded and later sentenced to 6 months imprisonment


 
Item: 181245
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 4 June 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825 (Ancestry)
Details: William Bond, Patrick Hoy and Daniel Horrigan, belonging to the gaol gang, charged with refusing to work and disobedience of the overseer. Henry Smith, Deputy Overseer states....the prisoners were placed this morning in my charge to work at the church. I could not get either of them to do any work and when I asked them to they abused me very grossly and told me they would work as they liked. I desired them to remove some rubbish that was in the way and they would not move and called me a man killing scoundrel. Bond, Hoy and Horrigan sentenced to 25 lashes each


 
Item: 182326
Surname: Smith
First Name: Henry
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 6 January 1827
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: Henry Smith per ship Almorah, in service to George Brooks, charged with stealing part of the produce of his master s farm particularly a bag of potatoes...George Wood, Hospital Gardener, being duly sworn, states - on the Saturday morning before Christmas Day I assisted Smith to take a bag of potatoes from the hut on Mr. Brooks farm to the boat for the purpose of its being conveyed to Mr. Brooks house at Newcastle. There was a small bag which held about thirty pounds put into the large bag, the contents of which might then in the whole be about 100lb. That is to say 30lb in the smaller bag and 70lb in the large one; they were not weighed but I estimate them at above that quantity. When I returned to Newcastle between twelve and one o clock of the same Saturday night, Mr. Brooks, servant Henry Winchester told me that only a small bag of potatoes had been delivered by Smith at his Masters. I am certain there were potatoes in both bags. I assisted to fill them. Edward Hostead, stockman in the service of E.C. Close states - I recollect coming to Newcastle in a boat in company with Smith on the Saturday before Christmas. Smith had a large bag of potatoes with hi, within which was also a smaller bag contaiing potatoes. I think that both the bags might have held about a hundred weight. I saw a person of the name of Riley take the small bag to convey to Mr. Brooks house, but I dont know what became of the large bag and its contents . Bernard Riley states - I remember on the Saturday before Christmas having brought from the wharf a small bag of potatoes for Smith. I only carried the bag as far as Serjeant Greys quarters when Smith took it from me and proceeded with it towards Mr. Brooks house. The bag contained to the best of my opinion between thirty and forty pounds weight. I also observed a bag of potatoes in the boat but did not see it taken out. I cannot say if the bag carried as far as Serjeant Greys was that which I saw in the boat. I was not present when it was taken out. Henry Winchester in the service of George Brooks, states - On the Saturday before Christmas Henry Smith brought a small bag of potatoes from my master s farm to the house, it contained about twenty or thirty pounds - the bag was not full. Serjeant Grey of the 3rd regt of Buffs states - I have bought from the prisoner two dozen eggs at one time and some butter at another, I never bought anything else from him. I understood from him that the eggs and butter were the property of John Thomas. I was certain the butter belonged to Thomas as it was in a keg which I had sold to him. and having bargained with Thomas for his eggs at certain sum and the prisoner having told me that the eggs and butter were sold by him on account of Thomas, I did not doubt but that such was the case. John Thomas (free) states - I once entrusted the prisoner to dispose of some butter for me. I was ill at the time and I thought I might do so with safety as he appeared to be acting as Mr. Brooks overseer and had on former occasions behaved towards me with much civility, but I never gave him any eggs to dispose of. He did not bring me the money for which he sold the butter, he told me he had been robbed of it. In answer to a question from the prisoner - I never gave him an egg to sell in my life. I might have given him some to eat when he came to my house. John Mayo states - A day or two before Christmas, Smith sold me about 30lb potatoes; they were not weighed. I gave him 3 shillings for them. He had told me some moths previous that his master allowed him one fourth to dispose of and that he had a piece of garden ground the produce of which he was allowed for himself, the potatoes were in a bag that would hold about one hundred weight. George Brooks states - Within two months after maize harvest last year, the prisoner admitted that he had sold a bag of Corn off the farm, but said it was for my benefit. I told him and repeated it that he was not to bring anything from the farm to the town without my knowledge.. I recollect his reply was - Very well Sir - If he has sold any part of the produce since it is in contradiction to my injunctions. It is only this morning that I found out that the prisoner had sold potatoes to John Mayo. I have fowls on the farm and expect to be occasionally supplied with eggs. The prisoner states in his defence I did not understand from my Master that I was not to dispose of the produce of the farm, or bring it into town, or I should not have done so. I admit having sold the potatoes to Mayo, but never sold any eggs belonging to Mr. Brooks. Those I sold to Serjeant Grey were given to me by John Thomas to dispose of. I have also sold to John Thomas a half hundred weight of potatoes and thirty pounds of flour. I considered the flour to have been my own property. Sentenced to Hard labour in an iron gang for 12 months


 
Item: 36078
Surname: Williams
First Name: George
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1828
Place: Wallis Plains
Source: 1828 Census
Details: Stonemason aged 37. Free. With Ann Clift


 
Item: 77481
Surname: Williams
First Name: George
Ship: Almorah 1820
Date: 1821 11 July
Place: Newcastle
Source: CSI
Details: On list of prisoners transported to Newcastle



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