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Item: 181409
Surname: Cottage Creek
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 8 August 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825 (Ancestry)
Details: Samuel Beckett and Duncan Kennedy both in government service charged with being out of quarters at unseasonable hours and on suspicion of attempting a robbery at the Farm Cottage occupied by Rev. Threlkeld....Mr. Threlkeld states. ....between one and two oclock yesterday morning the dogs at the farm gave an alarm, I got out of bed and went to the camp of the native blacks near the house. One of them told me some white men had been there and had struck him with a musket and told him to be gone. A man servant at the farm searched the adjacent grounds and saw some men concealed who made off on perceiving him. Joseph Davis snapt his pistol at one of them but it missed fire. Throsby the black fired but missed his object.. Joseph Davis states - About 1/2 past twelve yesterday morning I was abed and heard the dogs making a great noise. A native black called Throsby came and called m and said there were white men with muskets threatening to shoot him. I got my pistol and opened the window but did not then see any stranger; I went to the fire where the blacks were and then saw a man at distance running. I cannot speak to his person. I did not go to bed but remained with the blacks. The master retired to the house. About an hour after one of the blacks told me there was a stranger behind one of the huts. I went and asked who was there but did not get an answer but a man ran away. I shot my pistol at him, it miss fired. Throsby fired but without effect. We followed the man a short distance but lost sight of him. Kennedy, the man I shot at was only five or six yards from him. Two native blacks, Throsby and Purcell state that they saw at the farm yesterday morning four men, two of them had muskets, the person who had the muskets were named Leary or Lowe, bot free. Leary struck Throsby with the butt end of his musket. Beckett and Kennedy were with them. In this stage of the proceedings the Chief Constable stated that from certain private information he had received it was probably on further enquiry the intentions of the prisoners in going to the farm would be brought to light. Prisoners remanded to the following day


 
Item: 173933
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1 November 1848
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: TRAVERSING THE BOUNDARIES.-To-day, has been an unusual day at Newcastle- the tinkling of a bell and announcement of a crier summoned those of the citizens to the court-house who wished to accompany the magistrates with the surveyor to traverse the boundary line of our city. The principal parties in attendance were the chief magistrate, Major Crummer ; the second magistrate, Dr. Stacv; Captain Biddulph, the port master; the collector of quit-rents, and a host of native youths, started at about half-past twelve with Mr. Charlton, the surveyor and leader. The first point that was reached was the east corner-pin of the Burwood Estate, memorable not only as the boundary of this city, but for a malicious trick that had been perpetrated a few years ago on Mr. Kemps horse. We then proceeded along that fence in a westerly direction to another corner in, which was designated the Rum Comer, by the collector of quit-rents pouring on it a glass of rum. Thence we proceeded . through a swamp, which, from previous rains, was under water, creating no little amusement both to the men and boys. I ought to have mentioned that the party was attended by music and vocalists, whose loyalty was expressed by singing the anthem God save the Queen, Rule Britannia, and other national songs, followed by great cheering at the several sentiments given by Captain Biddulph and the magistrates. When the whole party reached the Cottage Bridge, and passing the meat-preserving establishment of Mr. Dangar, most of them had a good swim in the creek before re- turning to the court-house, where, after again singing the anthem God save the Queen, the party dispersed, pleased with their recreation. N.B.-The waters of the Hunter and South Pacific Ocean are the other boundary lines.


 
Item: 173934
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 24 March 1855
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: William Page. butcher, opening business in his newly erected premises near the Cottage Bridge


 
Item: 173935
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 18 February 1856
Place: Newcastle
Source: Empire
Details: Meeting of Representatives of the United Counties of Northumberland and Hunter held at the Railway Inn at Cottage Bridge, Newcastle


 
Item: 173936
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 30 April 1859
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: An allotment of land near the Cottage Bridge sold for 100 pounds in 1859


 
Item: 173945
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 12 August 1926
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: A kiosk was established on the Cottage Bridge, Hunter Street, West by the Limbless and Maimed Soldiers Association in 1926


 
Item: 173946
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 17 December 1923
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: A big Christmas attraction in Newcastle - Perry Bros. combined ring circuses and menageries to open near the Cottage Bridge, Hunter Street


 
Item: 173947
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 13 September 1883
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: Gilbert Bros., coachbuilders and undertakers situated at Cottage Bridge, Newcastle


 
Item: 173937
Surname: Cottage Creek Bridge (Hotel)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 12 July 1859
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: An old Established business to be let - The Railway Hotel near the Cottage Bridge, Newcastle. The house contains ten rooms in addition to the bar, kitchen, wash house, and store. It has a large yard with stabling and an excellent well of water. It is in very good repair; is situated in an increasing neighbourhood and is now in full trade etc


 
Item: 106650
Surname: Cottage Creek Burial Ground
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1857
Place: Half a mile from Newcastle
Source: A voyage to Australia and NZ., J.A. Askew
Details: Small cemetery in a neat enclosure containing several headstones bearing the names of captains who had died at the port. Askew was driven out of the area by mosquitos


 
Item: 167041
Surname: Cottage Creek Burial Ground
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: Newcastle
Source: Australian Cemeteries Index
Details: The original Honeysuckle Cemetery, also known as Newcastle West and Cottage Creek, was located between Hunter Street and the main northern railway line at the western end of the city of Newcastle. It comprised a Wesleyan Methodist/Presbyterian portion and a Roman Catholic portion that were in use from c.1840. The cemetery was closed in 1883 when Sandgate Cemetery was opened. Early in the 20th century, the Honeysuckle site was resumed by the Railways Department. All the remains were exhumed and reinterred, mostly at Sandgate but a few at Swansea, in 1916.......http://austcemindex.com/cemetery.php?id=162


 
Item: 173932
Surname: Cottage Creek Burial Ground
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 March 1902
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: Only three non conformist denominations were then represented and in the Presbyterian, Catholic and Wesleyan Churches were dedicated the land at Hunter Street west, upon which may now be found the fast decaying memorials of past generations of Novocastrians. Looking at the neglected cemeteries today, the present generation will entirely fail to realise the scene which presented itself to those who chose the site for a burying ground. From the earliest years, the place was known as the Cottage Bridge, from the fact that on the banks of the creek there formerly stood a cottage occupied by an officer who controlled the prisoners engaged in making the roads. In Mr. C.H. Hannells childhood, he was carried by the blacks to see the last of the cottage which was destroyed by fire; but though many years have elapsed the name has never changed. (Note - Clarence Hewson Hannell was baptised at Newcastle in November 1836)


 
Item: 173938
Surname: Cottage Creek Burial Ground
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 5 April 1862
Place: Newcastle
Source: Newcastle Chronicle
Details: Presbyterian Burial Ground, Cottage Bridge - The Trustees have appointed Mr. William Stirton, Sexon and Overseer to this place of interment. The key of the gate will be in his possession and he has the right of opening the ground for graves. His residence will be in one of Mr. Clarkes cottages near the burial ground. Any one wishing to bury on this ground must procure an order from the Trustees of St. Andrews Church Watt Street


 
Item: 181416
Surname: Cottage Creek Camp (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 9 August 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825 (Ancestry)
Details: Samuel Beckett and Duncan Kennedy on remand from previous day brought before the court....It appearing that the object of the prisoners in going to the Farm Cottage as stated in the proceedings previously was not for the purpose of plunder, but with a very reprehensible intention of communicating with the female servants of Rev. Threlkeld and the black native girls encamped in the vicinity of the Cottage, the more serious part of the charge is withdrawn and they are thereupon sentenced to be confined at night to the Prisoner Barracks


 
Item: 173770
Surname: Cottage Creek Cemetery
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 March 1902
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: When the cemeteries were first opened Cottage Bridge was quite in the bush, and by the side of Throsby Creek, under the forst trees, through which could be obtained a glimpse of the distant harbour, the first of the dead were laid to rest. Half a century makes a great change in a city. In the years which have intervened, the increasing population has caused an expansion of the town, so that what once was a quiet graveyard in the bush is now well within the lmits of the city and fronts the main thoroughfare. Today these abodes of the dead present a mournful appearance, and a general air of neglect pervades the place . In the Roman Catholic portion, which lies nearest the city, the fence has been partially destroyed and a track made by trespassers from Hunter St. to the railway line. Amid the graves of the dead irreverent hands have thrown refuse of varous descriptions while weeds and a mass of tanled unkempt grass has obliterated all marks of the paths which formerly existed there. Many of the stones have fallen down, while the fences enclosing the graves are rotting away and in some instances have entirely disappeared. Some of the headstones remain in a fair state of preservation, while others have so far fretted away that the inscriptions are illegible. Here and there a few words may be deciphered and on one in particular which must have been a fine stone in its day, there can be traced the words Memory of 99th regt, showing that beneath it there rests the mortal remains of one of the soldier belonging to the regiment quartered there in olden times. Another stone close by bears tribute to the memory of Sgt. McCormick. All but the name has disappeared but very old residents will recall in the name mentioned another old soldier whose fortunes were linked with Newcastle in the early days. One of the oldest stones in the cemetery is that which marks the resting place of Corporal George Caldwell of the Mounted Police, who died in 1845, and in spite of its age it is in good state of preservation. Here as elsewhere one meets with some quaint epitaphs, a well preserved stone bearing the following inscription - Erected by William and Ann Horan to the memory of their brother Denis Horan of Tipperary, Ireland who died 7 April 1847 aged 42 years. - Remember man, as thou pass by, As thou art now, so once was I, As I am now, so thou shalt be, Remember man and pray for me. In a quiet corner of the graveyard there is a stone that bears tribute to the scholars of St. Marys School. The inscription reads Pray for the Soul of Mary Sullivan of Killarney Ireland who died March 7 1878. This stone was erected by the scholars of St. Marys School. Near the dividing fence which separates the Presbyterian from the Roman Catholic portions there is a grave which although of comparatively recent date is of pathetic interest. The stone bears, among others the inscription - To the memory of Richard Cavender who died at the Palmer River Goldfields 1876 aged 28..A paling fence divides the Roman Catholice ground from the Presbyterian, When the land was first dedicated it was granted absolutely to St. Andrews, then the Presbyterian Church in the town. Trustees were appointed but these are all long since dead and the cemetery is at present controlled by Alderman D. Miller on behalf of St. Andrews. Although granted exclusively to the Presbyterian people others were buries there, but whom the first interment was made no one seems able to tell. The ground is in much better order than the one adjoining, but nevertheless bears unmistakable evidences of neglect. The paths are fairly well defined and the fences almost intact, while the general appearance is greatly improved by a few large trees, which throw a kindly shade over the graves. But as in other instances, individual graves are suffering from want of attention. It is over 20 years since the last interment was made there and it may be that the relatives of the deceased are also dead or resident in other places. One of the oldest graves dates back to 1847, the stone bearing the simple inscription - Thomas Bruce, died April 1846 aged 42 years. Among those buried in the 50s was Captain Andrew Drysdale a well known intercolonial shipmaster in his day. He died in port in 1852 and the stone which marks the grave may be seen from the footpath. Very close by lie the remains of another sailor, who was drowned in the harbour of New Years Even 1863. The inscription on the stone which is a fine one, tells that the memorial was erected to the memory of David Murray, second mate of the barque Dudbrook, by his brother and shipmates by whom he was highly respected. The incident marks a spirit which does not exist in the merchant marine today among officers and men of deep water vessels. Among those who passed away in the sixties was Mr. William Henderson, whose stone bears the following inscription - Erected as a measure of grateful respect by James and Alexander Brown of Minmi. Another stone fast falling down is that which denotes the burial place of Jane and John Wood who passed away respectively in 1868 and 1867 and close by a broken column marks the grave of Mr. Archibald Rodgers who was the founder of the business carried on by his son Alderman Rodgers and latterly by his grandsons Messrs Rodgers Bros., Mr. Archibald rodgers who died in 1870 was practically the first man to start a foundry in the city. There are many graves which cannot be identified in several cases the headstone have fallen, others have no distinguishing mark, some of th graves being merely fenced in. Even iron railings have been torn away from some of the graves and as no trace of the iron remains vandalism rather than decay is suggested. Nature has done her work and from among the weeds there is growing a wonderful profusion of beautiful lillies planted years ago by some reverent hand, and blooming still with only nature as a gardener. The Wesleyan Cemetery is a considerable distance away, the plot lying between the railway line and the road which crosses the high level bridge. What its appearance was like years ago it is hard to imagine, but old residents tell gruesome stories of interments there at which the coffin floated in water and had to be forced down with poles while the graves were filled in. A part of the land was continuous to a swmap, but it is hard to define the boundaries now. A very small piece remains enclosed with a ricketty fence and in the enclosure there are all that remains of five graves. On one of these is an inscription dating back to 1860 but the others are nameless. It is a debatable point whether some portion has not already been built upon and, as a matter of fact, its existence as one of Newcastles earliest cemeteries is almost forgotten. All three cemeteries have now been closed many years, and the question arises as to whether it is not advisable to remove the remains to Sandgate and utilise the land for other purposes. The desolate and neglected appearance of all three suggest that the time has come for their removal...


 
Item: 173939
Surname: Cottage Creek History
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 29 March 1952
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: The Railway Inn down by Cottage Creek was erected and named when surveyors were making their calculations for the line. The first hotel at the West End it was eventually replaced by the existing Empire.


 
Item: 82570
Surname: Cottage Creek Newcastle
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1851 15 March
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: Bridge substantially repaired and excellent road formed on the heavy sandy tract between Cottage Creek Bridge and Throsby's Creek


 
Item: 94586
Surname: Dargle Cottage
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1852 15 September
Place: -
Source: MM
Details: John F. Doyle


 
Item: 75032
Surname: Dieckman's Cottage
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1850 1 June
Place: West Maitland
Source: MM
Details: Dr. Mullins commencing practise in Dieckman's Cottage opposite the Presbyterian Church


 
Item: 102625
Surname: Earley's Cottages
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1853 6 July
Place: Devonshire Street, West Maitland
Source: MM
Details: L. MIlward, cooper, conducting business at No3. Early's Cottages, Devonshire Street



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