Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 183646
Surname: Dicky (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 26 January 1872
Place: Darlinghurst gaol
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Details: Dicky, an aboriginal native of Maitland aged 27 years died while confined at Darlinghurst gaol. Had been convicted of rape


 
Item: 183987
Surname: Dicky Charcoal (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 29 November 1834
Place: Sugarloaf Creek, Hunter River district
Source: Sydney Gazette
Details: Forty pounds reward offered for the apprehension of the following men who stood charged with having committed rape and robbery at the farm of John Lynch at Sugar Loaf Creek on 5th November 1834.....Young Price, Charcoal s Brother or Dickey Charcoal, Bill or Miserable Billy, Mickey, Jemmy Jackass and Joe the Marine, all black natives


 
Item: 183340
Surname: Dillon (Indigenous)
First Name: Tom
Ship: -
Date: 4 August 1923
Place: Newcastle
Source: The Newcastle Sun
Details: NOTABLE ABORIGINE A link with the past was broken when Tom Dillon died at Newcastle hospital recently at the age of 90 years Old Tom was a well-known flgure in Newcastle, and had many friends, who not only respected the fine old ma, but had learned lo love him. He was born on the Hawkesbury River, but early in his life was taken up country by one of the pastoralists of the upper Hunter. There he was taught station work, and became an expert in handling blood stock. As a trusty farm hand his career in the Hunter valley is well-known. In his declining years he entered the mission station at Karuah, where he received every care and attention, and always had a hut to himself. It was only when he reached eighty and was unable to do any further work, that he could be persuaded to leave farm life. This fine old native had many friends, who attended to his wants during tho twilight of his life, and to many he proved an entertaining companion especially on the days of Governor Gipps, of which time he had a vivid recollection, and being an intelligent man was able to tell many stories of the early life in Australia. When Old Tom died an effort was made to have him buried in one of the cemeteries accessible to the Hawksbury. But there was no public fund available which could spare a few pounds to mark the last resting place of the final representative of that great trlbe of people, with whom Governor Phillip and his successors were so closely in touch for over 70 years. However, official callousness has conferred an historic favor on New- castle, for Tom s grave In Sandgate cemetary is being marked in such a substantial manner as will perpetuate his memory


 
Item: 168794
Surname: Dilworth (Indigenous)
First Name: Thomas
Ship: -
Date: 1853
Place: Maitland
Source: Australia Birth Index (Ancestry)
Details: Son of Jonas Dilworth. Birth registered at Maitland


 
Item: 72533
Surname: Dismal ( Bumborokan) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1836
Place: -
Source: Threlkeld
Details: Of Newcastle. Wife Nanny


 
Item: 175963
Surname: Dismal (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1830s
Place: Lake Macquarie
Source: Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition During the Years 1838 ...By Charles Wilkes
Details: Assaults from their own. This not unfrequently happens; and it is not long since the brother of King Ben was speared while asleep, for some private grudge, by Dismal;


 
Item: 183273
Surname: Distribution of Blankets (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1839
Place: Dungog
Source: The Wingham Chronicle 10 August 1943
Details: On 17 April 1839 Captain Thomas Cooke addressed the Colonial Store keeper at Sydney with a request that the regular supply should be forwarded at once......The blacks are beginning to enquire seriously about them and if they are not yet sent off please let the 200 for Port Stephens be shipped by the A.A. Company schooner Carrington and the fifty for Dungog by the steamer Maitland for Clarence Town on the first Saturday of next month


 
Item: 183275
Surname: Distribution of Blankets (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1840
Place: Dungog
Source: The Wingham Chronicle 10 August 1943
Details: In 1840 there was a move to abolish or restrict the distribution of blankets to the natives. In reply to an official letter from Sydney, Captain Thomas Cook wrote – I do myself the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of Sept. 11th 1840, relative to the future distribution of blankets to the aboriginal natives of Port Stephens and Dungog districts, and in restricting those present to this part of the district, His Excellencys commands shall be strictly obeyed. The blacks in this quarter are generally honest and quiet, and if they do at any time purloin poultry or produce from the settlers, it is not for their own comfort and use that they do so but to please the white fellows on some distant station who cohabit with their gins. Eighty blankets could be issued here to as many useful and deserving blacks, making an addition of thirty to the former complement bestowed on us


 
Item: 182245
Surname: Doughboy (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 26 November 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: Patrick Hoy, Samuel Harris, Edward Flyn, William Ward and John Austin, all in the service of the Australian Agricultural Company at Port Stephens charged with being at large without passes....Mr. George Muir, chief constable states - On Wednesday evening the prisoners were delivered to my custody by Constable George Higgins and a soldier of the Buffs who stated they had received them from Mr. Joseph Pennington, overseer and some native blacks at the 1st branch of the Hunter River. A letter from Mr. Joseph Pennington, a free settler, produced and read of which the following is a copy.....Leigh Farm, Hunters River, 14th November 1826...I beg leave to report that my overseer in junction with the following named black natives viz Doughboy, Kennedy, Bremen, Taylor and Jemmy Murray, captured the five following named convict servants assigned to the A.A. Co., who ran from their service on Saturday evening last viz - Edward Flyn (Surry 4th), Samuel Harris (Norfolk), Patrick Hoy (Isabella), John Austin (Hebe) and William Ward (Ann and Amelia). I should conceive my overseer as well as the Blacks are entitled to some reward as a stimulus to future exertions and request they may be noticed as others are performing similar services, I am, Sir, Joseph Pennington......The prisoner being called on to account for their being absent from their assignments - Patrick Hoy states as follows - Our reason for leaving Port Stephens was for the purpose of proceeding to the nearest Magistrate to make our complaint - We were on the way to Newcastle when we met Mr. Pennington s overseer to whom we surrendered ourselves and accompanied him without objection altho we were five in number. Four of us belong to the same gang at Port Stephens and were employed in breaking up new ground. There were sixteen in the gang and every Monday morning one hundred rod per man was measured off for our weeks work. The ground was hard to work and we were not able to accomplish the task, upon one occasion 15 of the gang received 25 lashes each for not performing it. I escaped from being on the sick list, besides which it was sometimes the custom to stop our allowance of tea and sugar if the task was not completed. It is impossible to do 100 rod in a week on new ground such as we had to work. We tried to do it but could not. We have even got to work in the morning before the Bugle sounded for work to try what we could do but with our utmost efforts from day break to sun set we could not succeed. Our rations are good. We have no complaints on that account. Harris, Flyn and Ward corroborate this statement. John Austin states - I was employed with two others to put up fences, that is not my trade - I am a sawyer. We were tasked to do 20 rod of rail per week, to cut and split the stuff and mortice and put it up. It is more than any three men can do. On remonstrating with Mr. Dawson, he said we must do even more. Remanded for a further hearing


 
Item: 81005
Surname: Duff (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 January 1851
Place: Black Creek
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Involved in a New Years Day riot at Black Creek


 
Item: 4512
Surname: Duke of Wellington (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 19 March 1842
Place: Maitland
Source: HRG
Details: Aboriginal. Charged with spearing cattle


 
Item: 176190
Surname: Duwarrow (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1834
Place: Segenhoe
Source: Hunter Estates Comparative Heritage Study
Details: An extravagant welcoming ceremony was arranged by Thomas Potter Macqueen occasioning a visit by Governor Richard Bourke in 1834 to Segenhoe that included the attendance of both David King of Segenhoe and Duwarrow, Chief of Mr. Hart Daviss Principality, called Waverly


 
Item: 107690
Surname: Edward and Jenny (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 11 March 1852
Place: Newcastle
Source: Register Book of Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle. Burials p24
Details: Edward, son of


 
Item: 168796
Surname: Elizabeth B (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1854
Place: Hexham
Source: Australia Birth Index (Ancestry)
Details: Daughter of Jane. Birth registered at Hexham


 
Item: 168790
Surname: Ellen (Indigenous) Brisbane Water
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1849
Place: Gosford, Kincumber
Source: Australia Birth Index (Ancestry)
Details: Daughter of Margaret and Ned. Birth registered Gosford district


 
Item: 176271
Surname: Emily (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 30 August 1902
Place: Port Macquarie
Source: Sydney Mail
Details: Wife of King Robert Fly of Port Macquarie


 
Item: 124763
Surname: Emu (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 20 May 1835
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: NGE
Details: Committed for trial on a charge of robbery. Admitted to Newcastle gaol 20 May; set at large by the Sheriff s authority 9 June. Quiet conduct in gaol


 
Item: 180630
Surname: Finigan (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 27 October 1835
Place: Newcastle
Source: Newcastle Court of Petty Sessions, Bench Books, 1833-1836 (Ancestry)
Details: Jemmy, Croasby, Finigan, Betsy and Mary, native blacks charged with drunkenness...Constable William Anthony testified....yesterday evening between five and six oclock the prisoners were drunk and quarrelling in the street. They were very noisy and disturbing the whole neighbourhood. No defence offered. They acknowledged to have been drunk and disorderly. Guilty. Sentenced to pay five shillings each or in default two hours in the stocks


 
Item: 167422
Surname: Fishing (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 26 May 1849
Place: Jerrys Plains
Source: MM
Details: Very dry weather is the sad remark introductory to all conversation here, whether between old friends or strangers. Evan the black native joins in the lamentation, but there is a sly expression or conscious mimicry in his eye which assures you that he, at least is only pretending to look before and after, and sigh for what is not. Our sable brethren by the bye, are turning the lowness of the river to good account, by dragging the holes with a net, which they carry about with them in a basket. They boast of not having left a fish between this and Singleton. Having spent a few days here in fishing by day and drinking rum by night, they have gone higher up the river, promising if they can find a market for their fish to have a good spree on their return. Billy Good-day, the black who lost his arm in Maitland is apparently the leading man of the party, being the owner of lessee of the fishing net. A friend of mine endeavoured to reason with Billy on the folly of spending his earnings in rum, instead of buying tea and sugar, shirts, and such like solid comforts; but billy answered, Murry fond of rum, massa; blackfellow always buy rum always!, laying an emphasis on the last word, as if twas written in the book of fate, and there fore useless to talk of altering it.


 
Item: 165685
Surname: Flash Jack (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 13 July 1839
Place: Paterson
Source: Registers of Coroners Inquests and Magisterial Inquiries (Ancestry)
Details: Died from wounds inflicted by persons unknown



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