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Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 175837
Surname: Carleton (28th regiment)
First Name: Martin
Ship: -
Date: 19 September 1835
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: Newcastle Gaol Entrance Book. State Archives NSW; Roll: 136
Details: Soldier of the 28th Regiment. Admitted to Newcastle gaol from Green Hills stockade. To be confined in the cells for 10 weeks. Returned to his regiment at Newcastle 28th November 1835


 
Item: 175446
Surname: Day (99th regiment)
First Name: Captain Henry James
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: 1840s
Source: Soldiering Fifty Years Ago: Australia in The Forties by George Jean de Winton
Details: Captain Deering was succeeded on Norfolk Island by Captain Day, who brought to the task the magisterial experience gathered in Maitland, where he had charge of the stockade, and that gathered from his associa-tion as a magistrate with Mr. Price when previously quartered on the island. To the character of Captain Day I cannot refrain from bearing tribute. He married early in life a lady without fortune, and had only his pay to live on, yet not only was he never in debt, but so excellent was his management of his income that he always kept up a good appearance, and both at Maitland and at Norfolk Island there was no more hospitable house than his. Should these Reminiscences fall under the eyes of any of the numerous friends he made in Australia, they will learn with satisfaction that he lived to command his regiment, and at his death left a substantial provision for his widow and children. Old Maitlanders will remember the confusion of identity between the two Days on the magisterial bench Denny Day, the police magistrate, and Captain Day, his constant associate. They were in no way connected, but were fast friends.


 
Item: 102110
Surname: Evernden (Buffs) (3rd Regiment)
First Name: Lieutenant
Ship: -
Date: 1825 28 October
Place: Sydney
Source: Colonial Times and Tasmanian Advertiser
Details: Commander of the horse patrol recently established in Sydney. Embarking on the vessel Amity for Newcastle with 30 soldier to quell bushranging in the district. Their uniform was the same as the Governor's Body Guard


 
Item: 167856
Surname: Heaviside (57th regiment)
First Name: Captain
Ship: -
Date: 6 October 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: SG
Details: On Monday afternoon a detachment of teh57the regiment embarked on board the Government brig Amity, under the command of Captain Heaviside, to relieve a detachment of the 3rd (Buffs) doing duty at Newcastle, and sailed the same evening


 
Item: 175210
Surname: Sherry (4th regiment)
First Name: Sergeant
Ship: -
Date: 14 November 1835
Place: Newcastle
Source: Sydney Monitor
Details: John Tilley, stood indicted for striking George Botham with a spade or shovel, with intent to kill and murder him, at Newcastle on August 24th. Another count laid it with intent to do some bodily harm. It appeared from the evidence for the prosecution that the prisoner and prosecutor both belonged to the ironed gang at Newcastle. On the day laid in the indictment, Botham and others were employed filling a cart with stone, when Botham received a blow on the back of his head, which made him insensible, and, according to the evidence of Dr. Brooks; if it had not been in a slanting direction must have been fatal. Two other men belonging to the gang (Dredge and Byrnes) positively swore that they saw Tilley strike Botham with a spade, and Byrnes said, that Tilley stated, he would give himself up. It appeared, that Botham had previously applied for the situation of scourger, and had otherwise given annoyance to the gang by giving an account of some misconduct which had occurred. For the defense several witnesses were called; Sergeant Sherry of the 4th Regiment, deposed that he was on duty on the day which the accident occurred and he heard Dredge and Byrnes and several others of the gang, say, they did not see how he got the hurt; they only saw him fall, and that Botham himself said, his head got light and he fell against a stone, and upon his (the Sergeants) asking him, if any one had struck him, he said, no. Samuel Merritt, Overseer of Public Works at New- castle, deposed that he was present when Lieut. Gibson was making enquiry respecting Botham when Dredge handed him a piece of blue stone with some blood and hair on it; at the suggestion of Mr. Gibson he examined all the spades and shovels that were in or near the place where the men were at work. On his cross examination this witness admitted that notwithstanding his high sounding title, and that he had upwards of one hundred men under him, he was a prisoner without any remission of sentence and had seen as much trouble as most men. Storey, one of the gang positively swore that there were no spades or shovels on the ground and that in consequence of Mr. Nicholson being about to take charge, the tools were all being mustered. In summing up Justice Dowling drew the attention of the Jury to the fact, that the witnesses had in the first instance denied, that they had any knowledge of the circumstances, and that it was not, until there was some talk of a reward, that they preferred the evidence they had that day given. The Jury retired a short time and returned a verdict of, Not Guilty.


 
Item: 167167
Surname: Smith (48th regiment)
First Name: Sergeant James
Ship: -
Date: 29 November 1823
Place: Newcastle
Source: Colonial Secretary's Papers. State Records of NSW Special Bundles
Details: Died age 34. Sergeant of 48th Regiment. Interred 29th November 1823


 
Item: 173788
Surname: Smith (48th regiment)
First Name: Serjeant James
Ship: -
Date: 15 March 1902
Place: Christ Church Burial Ground, Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: Inscription on grave stone - Sacred to the memory of James Smith, colour-sgt, 48th regt., Nov. 28 1823 aged 34. Above the inscription were the crossed rifles, crest, and colours of the regiment, and the words, Talavera, Peninsula


 
Item: 174189
Surname: Smith (99th regiment)
First Name: Dr. G.R
Ship: -
Date: 5 April 1911
Place: Newcastle
Source: NMH
Details: In March 1845 a little child, the son of Mr. William Palmer died; but no doctor had been attending it and so an inquiry was held by Major Crummer in the absence of the coroner. Dr. G.R. Smith, surgeon of the 99th regiment made a post mortem examination and his evidence was that the child had died of natural causes


 
Item: 100222
Surname: The Buffs (3rd Regiment)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: -
Source: Wood., W. Allan., 'Dawn in the Valley', the Story of Settlement in the Hunter River Valley., Wentworth books, Sydney, 1972
Details: pp., 56, 62, 67, 82, 84, 118, 162


 
Item: 174153
Surname: Tracey (99th regiment)
First Name: Lance-Sergeant
Ship: -
Date: 2 December 1845
Place: Newcastle
Source: Newcastle Court of Petty Sessions Letter Book
Details: Correspondence in December 1845 from Major Crummer to the Colonial Secretary regarding an altercation between convict George Pope and Lance Sergeant Tracey of the 99th regiment who was employed as one of the overseers in charge of the prisoners in irons working on the breakwater. Tracey resided near the workshops on the hill adjoining the Signal Station... George Pope was requested by John Smith to secure some of his horses being driven away by Sergeant Tracey and an altercation took place. Major Crummer requested advice on the matter as George Pope had never been brought into question in the four years he had been at Newcastle. Major Last also gave Tracey a high character



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