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Item: 178845
Surname: Cabean Paddy (Cobawn Paddy) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1836
Place: Dungog
Source: Dungog Chronicle 1 December 1905
Details: Correspondence sent by Lawrence Myles, J.P. Police Office, Dungog to Lieut. Beckhear, commanding the Mounted Police at Jerrys Plains on 20th May 1836 ..Sir, Having this day received intelligence that the blacks are becoming very troublesome at the out stations on the Gloucester River, where the murders were committed last year, and that a large number are collected, headed by Cabean Paddy, the ringleader of the perpectrators of the late murders, and that they are assembled with similar intentions, I have the honor to request that you will be pleased to direct a party of the Mounted Police under your command to proceed there, calling at Mr. Lords farm, where Mr. Flett will accompany the party....


 
Item: 176528
Surname: Cabwn Joe (Cobbong Joe) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1850s
Place: Scone district
Source: The Scone Advocate 25 January 1923
Details: Reminiscences of Tom Alternator - Cabwn Joe, a native of Denman, and ruler of the local tribe. Joe was very hot tempered at times but was a good natured old fellow.


 
Item: 183281
Surname: Cabwyn Joe (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1840s
Place: Denman
Source: The Scone Advocate 25 January 1923
Details: The Reminiscences of Tom Alternator - Of the local blacks, he vividly brings back to mind Cabwn Joe, a native of Denman, and ruler of the local tribe. According to him, Joe was very hot- tempered at times, but was a good- natured old fellow. Then there were Natty (fighting general) and Scranny and Long Billy, who were physicians to the crowd. A bora was once held on Thornthwaite, some 150 blacks, including many from the Mudgee side, attending. The whole party camped on the Dartbrook, near the homestead, but repaired to a secluded spot for the ceremony, to them most sacred. On such occasions as these, the whites were not allowed to approach the ground, but no exception was taken to their presence at a corroboree, which were not such rarities.


 
Item: 176335
Surname: Cambo (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1 December 1831
Place: Segenhoe, the estate of Thomas Potter Macqueen
Source: Three Expeditions Into the Interior of Eastern Australia: With ..., Volume 1 By Thomas Livingstone Mitchell. p.20
Details: I was very anxious to obtain the assistance of an aboriginal guide, but the natives had almost all disappeared from the valley of the Hunter; and those who still linger near their ancient haunts, are sometimes met with, about such large establishments as Segenhoe, where, it may be presumed, they meet with kind treatment. Their reckless gaiety of manner; intelligence respecting the country, expressed in a laughable inversion of slang words; their dexterity, and skill in the use of their weapons; and above all, their few wants, generally ensure them that look of welcome, without which these rovers of the wild will seldom visit a farm or cattle station. Among those, who have become sufficiently acquainted with us, to be sensible of that happy state of security, enjoyed by all men under the protection of our laws, the conduct is strikingly different from that of the natives who remain in a savage state. The latter are named myalls, by their half civilized brethrenwho, indeed, hold them so much in dread, that it is seldom possible to prevail on any one to accompany a traveller far into the unexplored parts of the country. At Segenhoe, on a former occasion, I met with a native but recently arrived from the wilds. His terror and suspicion, when required to stand steadily before me, while 1 drew his portrait, were such, that, notwithstanding the power of disguising fear, so remarkable in the savage race, the stout heart of Cambo was overcome, and beat visiblythe perspiration streamed from his breast, and he was about to sink to the ground, when he at length suddenly darted from my presence; but he speedily returned, bearing in one hard his club, and in the other his bommereng, with which beseemed to acquire just fortitude enough, to be able to stand on his legs, until I finished the sketch.


 
Item: 13918
Surname: Camingbong (Carningbong) (Indigenous) Brisbane Water
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 14 February 1835
Place: Brisbane Water
Source: SG
Details: Aborigine convicted of felony and sentence of death recorded against him


 
Item: 184493
Surname: Camp Site (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: Wickham, Newcastle
Source: Newcastle Morning Herald 25 July 1931
Details: Reminiscences of Mrs. Newling who first came to Newcastle in 1869 - There was an aborigines camp at Wickham, on the site of Goninans workshops


 
Item: 58084
Surname: Carbone Jemmy (Kurrangbong Jemmy) (Indigenous) Brisbane Water
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 14 February 1835
Place: Brisbane Water
Source: Sydney Monitor
Details: Found guilty of robbing the station of Mr. Jaques


 
Item: 176287
Surname: Carbone Jemmy (Kurrangbong Jemmy) (Indigenous) Brisbane Water
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 14 February 1835
Place: Brisbane Waters
Source: Sydney Monitor
Details: Carbone Jemmy, Monkey, Whipemup, Major Little Dick, Leggemy, Tom Jones, and Litte Freeman, aboriginal natives, indicted for housebreaking and robbery at the house of Alfred Hill Jaques on 25 October 1834. Rev. Threlkeld interpreter. The attacked the house and kept throwing stones until they effected an entrance by a window, after which Mr. Jaques and his servant escaped but not till the servant had been speared. The natives gutted the house carrying off provisions, clothing etc. As the appearance of the prisoners had been much altered, their hair having been cut off in gaol, the identity of four of the prisonerss only was established. Carbone Jemmy, Whipemup, Tom Jones and Monkey found guilty and remanded. The other five were remanded on other charges


 
Item: 176977
Surname: Cawban Denis (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 12 May 1848
Place: Cheshunt, Jerrys Plains
Source: State Library of NSW. Papers relating to Aborigines in the Singleton District, Blanket for Native Blacks, Colonial Secretarys Office
Details: On list of aborigines to receive blankets


 
Item: 184740
Surname: Ceremonies (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1830s and 1840s
Place: Dungog
Source: Dungog Chronicle 9 July 1943
Details: Dr. Ellar McKellar McKinleys account of the initiation of the youths of the Dungog tribe


 
Item: 184744
Surname: Ceremonies (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: August 1818
Place: Newcastle
Source: The Newcastle Sun 30 May 1938
Details: From Governor Macquarie s journal - At night the King of the Newcastle native tribe with about 40 men, women and children of his tribe, came to Government House and entertained the Governor and his party in high style for half an hour. They too were given an allowance of grog


 
Item: 177453
Surname: Charley (Charlie Fisher) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 19 October 1895
Place: -
Source: The Maitland Weekly Mercury
Details: En passant, it would not be out of place to refer to Harry Brown and Charley, the two aboriginals, who accompanied Leichhardt. Harry Brown had a wonderful talent for anecdote and was most entertaining a rather happy accomplishment when no newspaper was seen for over a year. Brown was burnt to death at Newcastle some years after the return of the expedition. Charley, on the other hand, was morose and silent, hardly ever speaking. Mr. Roper was the only one in the party who would trust himself alone with Charley. The latter s strong point was his knowledge of direction, which was most wonderful. In making excursions in search for water or horses, etc., no matter how tortuous the course taken, Charley could point direct to the main camp and give the approximate distance


 
Item: 177455
Surname: Charley (Charlie Fisher) (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 12 August 1922
Place: -
Source: The Don Dorrigo Gazette and Guy Fawkes Advocate
Details: In July, 1844, Leichhardt was back in Sydney, and on August 13, 1844, left for Brisbane in the Sovereign steamer. He took James Calvert, John Roper, John Murphy (a boy of 16), a ticket of-leave man named Bill Phillips, and Harry Browne, a Newcastle aboriginal. On the Downs he added Pemberton Hodgson,- Charles Gilbert (a collector for Gould), Caleb (an American negro), and Charley (a Bathurst aboriginal), but Caleb and Hodgson returned to the Downs after the first month, leaving Leichhardt with five white men and two aboriginals, a small party to face that long journey through wild, unknown country to Port Essington. His provisions included 12001b. of flour, 2001b. of sugar,801b. of tea, and 201b. of gelatine. They had 301b. of powder, eight bags of shot, chiefly 4 and 6, seven muzzle loading guns, four pistols, and two cutlasses. His instruments included sextant, chronometer, Katers compass, artificial horizon, and small thermometer. Thus that small party journeyed on across creeks and rivers, through thick Brigalow scrubs, over rough ranges, through country where game and fish were abundant, the aboriginals either friendly or keeping out of sight, eating goannas, opossums, flying foxes, eels, fish, carpet snakes, mussels, and any bird or animal that could be cooked and eaten. Flying foxes were a favourite dish, and are excellent if roasted on red coals. The long-continued safety from the blacks led to a suicidal want of common precautions, especially at night, and on the night of June 28, 1845, the party camped beside a small lagoon on a box-tree flat on the present Nassau River, in latitude 15.55. Though surrounded by hostile and dangerous blacks, they camped in tents far apart, PhiUip3 actually on the opposite side of the lagoon, and there was nobody on watch. The blacks made a night attack, with a shower of woomera spears and a chorus of fearful yells. The party were all asleep, and even the fires burning brightly to reveal their position. The stupidity of it all seems incredible. Even the guns were not capped. Calvert and Roper received several spears, and were severely bruised by blows from the woomeras. A spear was driven into Gilbert s left lung, and he walked over to where Charley and Leichhardt were standing by the fire, gave his gun to Charley, saying, The blacks have killed me, drew the spear, and died at once. Drawing the spear was the very act he should not have done. How all the others escaped death on that unfortunate night passes all comprehension. Just 38 years afterwards I stood by that lagoon and heard the story from blacks who were among those who speared Gilbert. They told me that Leichhardts two blacks had improperly interfered with two aboriginal women a couple of days before, and the men were seeking revenge. Roper told me the same story in one of several letters I received from him when he was stock inspector at Merriwa, in New South Wales. The blacks told me that two of their people were killed and three wounded, and that when Leichhardts party went away, they dug up the body of Gilbert and cooked and ate it. So Gilberts grave, like that of Leichhardt, is lost for ever to the knowledge of mankind.


 
Item: 6313
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 11 February 1835
Place: Brisbane Water
Source: R v. Monkey & Others. Superior Court Records
Details: Aboriginal native arraigned for burglary in the house of Alfred Hill Jacques. Found not Guilty


 
Item: 6317
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1835
Place: Williams River
Source: R v. Monkey & Others. Supreme Court Records
Details: Murdered Alfred Simmons at Williams River and was hanged at Dungog 4 September 1835 after being forwarded by the steam packet


 
Item: 57659
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 29 August 1849
Place: Singleton
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Aboriginal. To be tried at Maitland Circuit Court on 10th Sept. for manslaughter


 
Item: 58061
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 12 September 1849
Place: Cockfighters Creek
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Aboriginal. Found guilty of feloniously killing James Watt by throwing a knife at his head. Remanded


 
Item: 58653
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 22 September 1849
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Aboriginal boy sentenced to imprisonment in Maitland gaol for three months


 
Item: 72524
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1835
Place: Maitland
Source: Threlkeld
Details: Of the Upper Williams River. Found guilty of the murder of Alfred Simmons


 
Item: 87842
Surname: Charley (Indigenous)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 4 February 1852
Place: Maitland
Source: Maitland Mercury
Details: Charged under the Masters & Servants act by James Clift when he absconded after being paid 30s wages



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