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Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 125254
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: Constable James
Ship: -
Date: 1830 17 February
Place: -
Source: Maitland Quarter Sessions
Details: Thomas Neale and John Rolestone found guilty of assaulting Constable James Wilkins. Robert Cox found not guilty. Rolestone sentenced to 9 months in irons


 
Item: 52663
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: Constable James
Ship: Asia 1825 (111)
Date: 1828 21 January
Place: Newcastle
Source: SG
Details: Appointed constable in place of Thomas Dwyer who resigned


 
Item: 182203
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 1 November 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: William Vallance per ship Adamant, in government service, charged with broaching a cask of rum, the property of the Crown. James Wilkins, overseer of the gaol gang, states - I detected the prisoner yesterday in the act of broaching a cask of Government Rum which was lying on the wharf; I cautioned him not to repeat the offence, and ordered him away. A short time after I again detected him committing the same offence, he had spilled the cask and I saw him lying on the ground drinking from it. The prisoner denies the offence. Sentenced to six months in the gaol gang


 
Item: 182216
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 6 November 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: James Longbottom, Patrick Simpson per Ann and Amelia, Timothy Duffy, per ship Countess of Harcourt, William Pitt per ship Henry, and Samuel Stapleton per ship Asia, all in government service, charged with gambling. Constable William Turvey, states - I was informed by James Wilkins (late overseer of the gaol gang) yesterday, that there were several men in a hut in St. Patricks Street, gambling. Wilkins appeared to be in liquor at the time. Mr. Muir was immediately informed of what Wilkins had told me. Mr. Muir and a constable lost no time in going to the house pointed out. Chief Constable George Muir states - I was informed yesterday of some prisoners being in a hut gambling; I went immediately thither; I found several persons in the hut, but did not see any appearance of gambling. On leaving the house, I met Wilkins who named the prisoners now before the court as the gamblers. James Wilkins states - I saw all the prisoners now before the court gambling yesterday; I looked in at the window of the hut where they were, four of them were actually at play and Longbottom was watching. There were other persons in the hut. They were throwing up halfpence. The prisoners generally deny the charge - call Dennis Flannery, constable, states - Wilkins told me yesterday that when he pointed out the gamblers to the Chief Constable, he was so drunk he did not know what he was about......All the prisoners acquitted of the charge except Stapleton who is ordered to be lumbered four successive Saturdays on account of his being in a hut not his own residence.


 
Item: 182315
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 29 December 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: John Byrne per John Barry and Michael Toomy per Hooghley, both in government service charged with theft. John Cooper states - On Tuesday last on my return from my work, I found that my house had been forcibly entered and that one shirt, one pair of trowsers, and a blanket belonging to myself and a short and pair of trowsers belonging to James Kellet had been carried off. Some stolen articles belonging to James Wilkins who also lived in the house were missing. The staple of the front door had been forced and the back door had been opened apparently on the inside. I immediately reported the circumstances to Constable riley. About an hour after William Webster who is the government servant of the Rev. Middleton, came to me saying that he understood I had been robbed and that a black native called Black Boy could show me where the things were. I went to the native who took me to the hollow behind the church where I found the blanket and one of the shirts which had been stolen. I asked if he knew who put them there. He said twas Duffy and a man who lived at my house. ON my questioning Duffy he told me he had not robbed me himself but he knew who had. Timothy Duffy states - I saw Byrne and Toomy together on Tuesday morning between the hours of 8 and 9 near where I live and at a little distance from Coopers. They were coming in the direction from the back of his house. Toomy had a bundle in his hand. Toomy and Byrne came to the door of my hut. Byrne lives in the hut with me, he went in and staid from ten to twenty minutes. Toomy wanted to go in also but I would not suffer him as I thought he had come dishonestly by the bundle which he carried upon which Toomy went away with it over the Hill towards the Church. I did not mention any of these circumstances to the constables until I was taken to the watch house on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery. The prisoner deny the charge and call in their defence William PItt who being sworn states - I was at the house adjoining where Duffy lives on Tuesday morning a little after 8 o clock. I saw a man with a bundle under his arm coming from the back of Coopers house. I had no suspicion of anything wrong. I thought he might be taking linen from the Parsonage to the washerwoman, as the path from there into the town passes at the back of Coopers. I do not know the man who carried the bundle. He was much taller than either of the prisoners who I know well. John Corrigan, states - I went to my work on Tuesday morning at six o clock at the mines. Byrne works there also. He works below. There are two spells. I am not certain whether he remained at the mines or went away during his spell hour. The Bench taking into their consideration the notoriously bad character of the witness Duffy acquit the prisoners


 
Item: 182369
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 6 February 1827
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: John Shea per ship Countess of Harcourt, in government service, charged with drunkenness which caused him to lose a shovel, the property of the Crown. James Wilkins, overseer of the Town Gang states - Yesterday after the dinner hour, I was employed loading the schooner Darling. Shea is one of my gang but perceiving him to be very tipsy, I told him to remain on shore, but at the moment I was shoving off the launch from the wharf, he jumped in. On his attempting to board the vessel he missed his hold and fell into the water; he had a shovel in his hands which was lost when he fell overboard. Admitted by the prisoner. John Shea sentenced to one month in the gaol gang


 
Item: 71357
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: Asia 1825 (111)
Date: 1829 27 March
Place: Newcastle
Source: Application to marry
Details: Aged 27. Application to marry Maria Darzalis


 
Item: 170512
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: Asia 1825 (111)
Date: 1825
Place: Newcastle
Source: Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters. Class: HO 10; Piece: 20
Details: Assigned to Mr. Close in the district of Newcastle


 
Item: 182204
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James
Ship: Asia 1825 (111)
Date: 6 November 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: James Wilkins, per ship Asia, overseer of the gaol gang, charged with taking his gang to a public house on the Sabbath. Chief Constable George Muir states - I was informed yesterday that some of the gaol gang were at Cheers Public House drinking. I sent some constables to ascertain the truth of the report; they returned informing me that they had found Wilkins and one of his gang drinking at the public house and the rest of the gang straggling about in the lumber yard. Constable Francis McNamara states - I went yesterday with some constables by order of Mr. Muir to Cheers House; I found Thomas Welsh, one of the gaol gang there drinking. His overseer was with him; the overseer went away as we entered. Welsh at first refused to leave the house saying he had the overseers leave to be there. Wilkins admits taking Welsh to the public house and that he drank two glasses of spirits with him. James Wilkins to be dismissed from his situation and to work in the mines.


 
Item: 144557
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James and Alice
Ship: -
Date: 1855 15 July
Place: Newcastle
Source: Register Book of Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle. Baptisms p. 55
Details: Labourer. Baptism of daughter Sarah Ann Wilkins


 
Item: 100857
Surname: Wilkins
First Name: James Francis
Ship: -
Date: 1829 May
Place: Newcastle
Source: Register Book of Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle p.14
Details: Marriage of James Francis Wilkins to Maria ?


 
Item: 182155
Surname: Wilkins (Overseer)
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 20 October 1826
Place: Newcastle
Source: NSW Courts Magistrates, Newcastle Police Court: 1823-1825, 1826-1827 (Ancestry)
Details: John Sullivan, in the service of government, charged with absenting himself from his gang, and being found gambling. James Wilkins, overseer of the town gang states - On Monday morning last the prisoner absented himself from his gang from the hour of ten to twelve. I went to the prisoner s barracks and found him there playing at cards in the cook house. There was money on the table. The prisoner denies having been at play says he does not know one card from another; admits having been absent but only as he thinks for about twenty minutes. John Sullivan sentenced to 10 days solitary confinement


 
Item: 20666
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James
Ship: -
Date: 1846 14 March
Place: Manning River
Source: MM
Details: Unclaimed letter held in the Sydney Post Office


 
Item: 165418
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James
Ship: Bengal Merchant 1838.....
Date: 1838
Place: -
Source: AO NSW Convict Indent Fiche No. 733
Details: Age 21. Reads. Labourer from Nottingham. Tried at Nottingham Quarter Sessions on 16 October 1837 and sentenced to 10 years transportation for stealing geese. 5ft 5in, ruddy complexion with brown hair and hazel eyes. Tattoos etc. Brother of Samuel Wilkinson who arrived on the same vessell and was convicted of the same crime. Samuel Wilkinson was aged 24 on arrival


 
Item: 11114
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James
Ship: Bengal Merchant 1838........
Date: 1844 30 March
Place: Paterson
Source: MM
Details: Ticket of Leave granted


 
Item: 179317
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James
Ship: Hooghley 1828
Date: 1828
Place: -
Source: Convict Indents. State Archives NSW. Microfiche 668. (Ancestry)
Details: Age 17. Plasterers boy from London. Tried in Essex 12 July 1826 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for robbing a till. Assigned to Edward Lockyer at Parramatta on arrival


 
Item: 179318
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James
Ship: Hooghley 1828
Date: 19 February 1840
Place: Newcastle gaol
Source: Newcastle Gaol Entrance Book. State Archives NSW. Roll 136
Details: Admitted to Newcastle from Sydney on a charge of absconding. Sent to the lockup at Maitland with several other absconders on 20 February 1840


 
Item: 153843
Surname: Wilkinson
First Name: James and Mary Ann
Ship: -
Date: 1854 28 December
Place: Dungog
Source: Australian Births and Baptisms - Family Search Historical Records
Details: Birth of Samuel, son of James and Mary Ann Wilkinson



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