Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 168106
Surname: Dempsey Island, Moscheto Island, Spit Island
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 21 January 1854
Place: Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: Sale of Crown Land at Moscheto, Dempsey and Spit Islands - purchasers - Lister, Fisher, Captain Pattison, Captain Lodge, Jordan, Read, Tully, W.H. Whyte and M. Magney


 
Item: 102502
Surname: Moscheto Island
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1844 2 November
Place: near Newcastle
Source: MM
Details: Allotments of land for sale


 
Item: 168094
Surname: Moscheto Island
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: September 1853
Place: Newcastle
Source: Register Book of Christ Church Cathedral Newcastle. Marriages p41
Details: Marriage of George Young and Jane Foster. Witnesses George and Mary Ann Hind of Mosquito (Moscheto) Island


 
Item: 168095
Surname: Moscheto Island
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1871
Place: Newcastle
Source: 1871 Parish of St. John's Newcastle Census p.2
Details: Charles Cruse and wife resident at Mosquito Island


 
Item: 168096
Surname: Moscheto Island
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1871
Place: Newcastle
Source: 1871 Parish of St. John's Newcastle Census p.2
Details: Dennis Verdan resident at Mosquito Island


 
Item: 168121
Surname: Moscheto Island (Mosquito Island)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 27 February 1878
Place: Newcastle
Source: SMH
Details: THE VAGABOND - ON fine days half the population of Newcastle gathers on the wharf. Every night too, it is con- sidered the thing to go and see the Sydney boat start; this allows opportunities for flirtations amongst the fairsex, and iced drinks amongst the elders. But at night the wharf is dark and damp, or dusty, and dirty, gloomy in either case. In the day time there is always life and motion on the river, and one can endure the grimy stickiness of the atmosphere, or the coal dust flying about for the sake of the busy scene around. Ships coming in or going out of port, ferry- boats crossing to the North Shore, steam tugs and tenders puffing up and down the river in a frantic manner, all black with coal and smoke. High above our heads the elevated sidings convey the waggons to the shoots, which discharge their contents into the vessels lying below. Looking up the river on certain days, one will see a very pretty sight, recalling reminiscences of many historic streams in Europe. I was talking to one of the smart water policemen when, raising my eyes, I saw afar off, on the waters, something green. In tlie midst of the prevailing dusky hue of everything around, this was a novelty. "That is one of the market boats from Mosquito Island," I was informed. Dancing along on the tide, it came nearer and nearer, and then we could see that it was rowed by an old woman and a boy, who, with a young girl, comprised the crew. These skil- fully manoeuvred their craft under a low bridge on the wharf, into a small basin used as a boat harbour. Now I could see that it was lucerne with which the flat-bottomed skiff was filled. "Under the seats, on the seats, and high above them the cool green forage almost hid the occupants. Some pumpkins and a box of peaches completed the freight. Turning again to the river, I saw half a dozen more boats coming down, one after the other. They were all stacked with lucerne, amidst which pumpkins; melons, peaches, apples, babies, and dogs were hidden. Sometimes a man and a boy rowed, sometimes a boy and girl, but all were hardy and healthy-looking, and pulled well at the oar. There was little time lost in unloading the produce on the side of the wharf, and sales were soon effected. It was a scene unlike any- thing in England. "It reminds me of the Rhine," I said, and as I spoke I heard the soft gutturals of the German tongue. Nearly all these were honest Teutons, who reside on small farms on the islands in the river, by which they bring their produce to mar- ket. But these would not half supply the garden stuff needed for Newcastle. There, as everywhere on this continent, the heathen Chinee is to be found-patient, industrious, frugal, making the soil yield more than any other can


 
Item: 168124
Surname: Mosquito Island (Moscheto Island)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: September 1853
Place: Newcastle
Source: Register Book of Christ Church Cathedral Newcastle. Marriages p41
Details: Marriage of George Young and Jane Foster. Witnesses George and Mary Ann Hind of Mosquito (Moscheto) Island


 
Item: 168129
Surname: Mosquito Island (Moscheto Island)
First Name: -
Ship: -
Date: 1853
Place: Newcastle
Source: A voyage to Australia and New Zealand including a visit to Adelaide
Details: Thomas Hyde of Mosquito Island. Presented passengers on the 'William Hyde' vessel with a basket of green peas from his garden



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