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Item:106660
Surname:(Indigenous)
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:1853
Place:Hexham
Source:A voyage to Australia and New Zealand., J.A. Asquith
Details:J.A. Asquith encountered an old native, the last of his tribe, at the Hexham post office, wall-eyed and nearly blind; covered in an old blanket; countenance indicative of frankness and intelligence. Supported by individuals residing near the river. Emaciated condition
Item:179972
Surname:(Indigenous) Abduction and Reprisal
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:1830s
Place:Dungog
Source:Dungog Chronicle
Details:The Earliest Inhabitants by Gordon Bennett - One statement recorded in the stilted handwriting of Capt. Cook of Auchentorlie, describes how a band of blacks stole a child, the daughter of a Mrs. Easterbrook whose husband was a clerk of the A.A. company at Stroud. They disappeared in a northerly direction but were pursued by a party of armed soldiers and assigned servants and overtaken some twenty miles away. Eleven blacks were killed and the child recovered. Writing his official report on the matter Capt. Cook said - The native blacks are very savage in this locality and it is necessary that we should all carry arms when travelling. In company with the clerk of the peace, Mr. Duncan F. Mackay, I was molested only last week by wild blacks between Dungog and Stroud and discharged my musket at several who threw spears at us.
Item:167443
Surname:(Indigenous) Battle
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:10 September 1920
Place:Maitland
Source:Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Details:An account of a battle of aboriginal tribes from Maitland, Sugarloaf, Glendon and Wollombi which occurred in 1843
Item:74428
Surname:(Indigenous) Blanket Supplies
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:31 May 1843
Place:Maitland
Source:CO
Details:Supplies of blankets usually sent from Sydney to Maitland district not supplied in the usual number
Item:74940
Surname:(Indigenous) Blankets
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:25 May 1850
Place:Maitland
Source:MM
Details:Aborigines of the district given blankets on the occasion of the Queen s Birthday
Item:179983
Surname:(Indigenous) Blankets
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:9 April 1841
Place:Dungog
Source:Dungog Copies of Letters Sent, 1839-1846
Details:Police office Dungog 9 April 1841 - Sir, Being at Stroud this week I had an opportunity of hearing some of the aboriginal natives enquire most anxiously for their blankets which they seem to prize much. The mornings and evenings begin to get chilly on the mountains and I fear unless the Blacks get some little shelter in the shape of a blanket or other covering they will get discontented. They are numerous here, and have hitherto been quiet and harmless, many of the men proving useful to the overseers of the Company stations but if denied of their present from His Excellency I will not answer for their
Item:180224
Surname:(Indigenous) Blankets
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:23 May 1846
Place:Newcastle
Source:Newcastle Court of Petty Sessions Letter Book
Details:Letter 46/49....Correspondence form Magistrate Richard Furlong to the Colonial Secretary...The winter season having now set in and the inclemency of the weather at the present period rendering the condition of the aboriginal natives in this district extremely distressing on account of their having been without the issue of blankets during the last year, I have the honor to recommend that his Excellency will be pleased to order that 33 blankets be forwarded to this district for delivery to the native blacks as an act of humanity towards alleviating their suffering
Item:180365
Surname:(Indigenous) Blankets
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:8 April 1848
Place:Newcastle
Source:Newcastle Court of Petty Sessions Letter Book
Details:Police Office, Newcastle.....I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Circular of 29th March 1848 requesting to be informed of the number of blankets that may be necessary to supply the Native Blacks at present belonging to this District and in reply thereto I beg to state that upon a muster of the names of those now residing in the district which includes the tribes of Lake Macquarie, Newcastle and Ash Island, I find their number to amount to about thirty eight (38) of both sexes and different ages. It may be necessary to observe that unless some measures are adopted by the Government prohibiting the white population from purchasing the Blankets to be issued to the aborigines that the humane intention intended to assist them ma be abased and defeated judging from the example of past years when the blankets have been purchased with avidity by the lower classes with spirits or such small sums as to enable the blacks to procure sufficient liquor to cause intoxication……J.H. Crummer (Magistrate)
Item:176365
Surname:(Indigenous) Bora Ring
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:1863
Place:Scone
Source:The Scone Advocate 4 February 1927
Details:On Kelvinside where large cattle yards were in 1927 a circle resembling a circus ring, and about 100 yards in circumference, was to be seen. Many box trees in the vicinity bore beautiful carvings and were works of art.
Item:173687
Surname:(Indigenous) Boxing Day
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:6 January 1847
Place:Dungog
Source:Maitland Mercury
Details:Boxing day has been unusually dull this year, and but for the noise of a drum and the piping of a few flutes that paraded the town at the head of a number of blackfellows, there would have been but little stir.....
Item:176214
Surname:(Indigenous) Brisbane Water Tribe
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:16 April 1827
Place:Gosford district
Source:The Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate 6 September 1934
Details:Extract from Gosford Bench Books - While it is not possible to give the exact number of each tribe of blacks in the district, says a letter of April 16 1827, there are five tribes viz., the Mial or Broken Bay tribe, the Tuggerah Beach tribe, the Wyong tribe, and the Narara and Erina tribes. The three first as well as I am able to judge consist of about fifteen each and the two last of about ten each, being in all about sixty five men, women and children
Item:173955
Surname:(Indigenous) Burial Ground
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:13 November 1915
Place:Newcastle
Source:Newcastle Morning Herald
Details:Mr. Colin Christie a former Mayor of the city and who has been identified with its movements since 1849 when he settled in Newcastle said that to his own recollections and from what he had learned from the very early settlers the site of the old markets was never a part of the cathedral cemetery.....The site where the Newcastle School of Arts stands (in 1915) was once a blacks camp and it was also the location of Newcastles original pound. Speaking of 1849, Mr. Christie said that the fence was then standing though the place was not in use as a pound. He was aware that blacks had been buried on the spot where the borough Markets were built many years later but he had never heard of it having been used as a burying ground for white people
Item:72509
Surname:(Indigenous) Burial Site
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:19 April 1845
Place:Coolie Camp
Source:MM
Details:Aboriginal Burial site found on the property of Jones A Smith
Item:102882
Surname:(Indigenous) Children
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:17 March 1831
Place:Correspondent from Newcastle
Source:Sydney Gazette
Details:Correspondence from R.H. at Newcastle regarding Rev. Threlkeld s mission work and the establishment of stations throughout the colony to place the children of natives
Item:78464
Surname:(Indigenous) Clothing
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:23 May 1827
Place:Newcastle
Source:Australian
Details:Distribution of blankets and slop clothing to natives at Newcastle in honour of the birthday of George the Fourth
Item:100639
Surname:(Indigenous) Clothing
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:8 June 1853
Place:Dungog
Source:Maitland Mercury
Details:Aborigines in the district had not received blankets usually given to them in winter and it was feared some would die of the cold. Had they not been in expectation of supplies being given to them, they would have furnished themselves with opossum cloaks
Item:173900
Surname:(Indigenous) Corroboree
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:28 April 1902
Place:Newcastle
Source:NMH
Details:On more than one occasion the blacks held a corroboree on the site of the premises now occupied by Messrs Hope Bros. It was there one day that James Buxton, son of Thomas Buxton, with some other young fellows was watching the aboriginals when a spear came hurling through the air and pierced his leg. (Hope Bros was located at 119 Hunter Street Newcastle (NMH 9 September 1897)
Item:174522
Surname:(Indigenous) Corroborees
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:7 June 1909
Place:Newcastle
Source:NMH
Details:Reminiscences by Mr. L.S. Holt, son of Chief Constable Holt, of Newcastle in the 1850s - The public pound stood on the site of the school of arts at the corner of Hunter and Wolfe streets. The blacks camped at the rear of the pound, and numerous corroborees and faction fights took place
Item:176336
Surname:(Indigenous) Dartbrook Tribe
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:8 December 1831
Place:Liverpool Ranges
Source:Three Expeditions Into the Interior of Eastern Australia: With ..., Volume 1 By Thomas Livingstone Mitchell p.28
Details:We reached at length, a water-course called Currungai, and encamped upon its bank, beside the natives from Dart Brook, who had crossed the range before us, apparently to join some of their tribe, who lay at this place extremely ill, being affected with a virulent kind of small-pox. We found the helpless creatures, stretched on their backs, beside the water, under the shade of the wattle or mimosa trees, to avoid the intense heat of the sun. We gave them from our stock some medicine; and the wretched sufferers seemed to place the utmost confidence in its efficacy. I had often indeed occasion to observe, that however obtuse in some things, the aborigines seemed to entertain a sort of superstitious belief, in the virtues of all kinds of physic. I found that this distressed tribe were also strangers in the land, to which they had resorted. Their meekness, as aliens, and their utter ignorance of the country they were in, were very unusual in natives, and excited our sympathy, especially when their demeanour was contrasted with the prouder bearing and intelligence of the native of the plains, who had undertaken to be my guide
Item:72873
Surname:(Indigenous) Drowning
First Name:-
Ship:-
Date:1850 6 March
Place:-
Source:MM
Details:Drowned at Anna Bay when he jumped from a fishing boat in boisterous weather. Left Newcastle with Captain Neven of the Fanny

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