Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 44442
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1838 5 May
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: SG
Details: Steward at Patrick Plains Races


 
Item: 56132
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1838 2 June
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: SG
Details: Steward at Patrick Plains Races


 
Item: 131102
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1837 31 May
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: GG
Details: Appointed Police Magistrate at Patrick Plains in the room of Captain Forbes who resigned


 
Item: 131103
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1843 11 October
Place: Mudgee and Wellington
Source: SMH
Details: Councillor


 
Item: 131104
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1856 29 March
Place: Parramatta
Source: SMH
Details: Appointed Justice to Officiate under the new Marriage Act


 
Item: 131105
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1861 6 November
Place: Parramatta
Source: SMH
Details: Marriage of Frederick Howard R.N., and Marcia Elizabeth Anne, second daughter of Charles Wray Finch


 
Item: 131106
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1874 30 April
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: Recommendation that a sum not exceeding 500 pounds be placed on the estimates for 1874 as a gratuity to the widow of Charles Wray Finch, late sergeant-at-arms of the House


 
Item: 131107
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 1837 15 April
Place: Sydney
Source: SG
Details: Appointed Magistrate


 
Item: 189901
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 17 December 1837
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: Maitland Baptism Register p. 171
Details: Charles, son of George and Elizabeth Gammony, born 29 November 1837. Baptised 17 December 1837. Occupation of George Gammony - In service of C.W. Finch, Police Magistrate


 
Item: 189903
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 7 May 1873
Place: -
Source: Evening News
Details: Death - on 6th May 1873, Charles Wray Finch, Sergeant-at-Arms, Legislative Assembly, and late of H.M. 17th Regiment, aged 64 years


 
Item: 189902
Surname: Finch
First Name: Charles Wray Esq
Ship: -
Date: 16 June 1837
Place: St. Phillips Church Sydney
Source: The Australian
Details: Marriage, by Rev. William Cowper, Charles Finch, to Elizabeth Emily, eldest daughter of H.C. Wilson Esq., of Millers Point


 
Item: 131846
Surname: Finch
First Name: J. Wray (?Charles Wray)
Ship: -
Date: 1837 4 October
Place: Patrick Plains
Source: GG
Details: J.P., Police Office, Patrick Plains. Notice re sale of cattle


 
Item: 189906
Surname: Finch
First Name: Lieutenant Charles Wray
Ship: Hercules 1830
Date: 1 November 1830
Place: Port Jackson
Source: Unassisted Immigrant Passengers Lists
Details: Lieutenant Charles Wray Finch of 17th regt., arrived as part of the Guard on the convict ship Hercules on 1 November 1830. The Hercules departed Dublin 3 July 1830 with 200 male prisoners


 
Item: 189905
Surname: Finch (obit)
First Name: Charles Wray
Ship: -
Date: 7 June 1873
Place: -
Source: Australian Town and Country Journal
Details: Charles Wray Finch was the eldest son of the Reverend Henry Finch, M. A. of Christ College, Cambridge, Lord of the Manor and Rector of Little Shelford, Vicar of Great Shel- ford, Vicar of Long Staunton (All Saints), Lord of the Manor of Cottenham, all in Cambridgeshire, and captain to the late Earl of Jersey. He was born at Henny Great, in the county of Essex, at the residence of his grandfather. He was educated at King Edward the 6th s School, Bury St. Edmond s. Suffolk. In 1830 he obtained a commission in H. M. 17th Regiment of Foot. The next year he came with his Regiment to this colony. Shortly after his arrival he sold out of the Regiment, and was appointed Police Magistrate at Patrick s Plains, on the 22nd May, 1831. This appointment he held for seven years. On the 14th June, 1837 he married the eldest daughter of the late Colonel H. C. Wilson, the- first Police Magistrate of Sydney. On the 8th of August 1S38 he resigned this office as Police Magistrate, and entered into pastoral pursuits, which he followed for several years, chiefly in the county of Wellington. He was on the commission of the Peace, and sat on the Bench at Wellington and Molong, until 1852, when he left that district, after a residence there of four teen years, and came to Parramatta. He there also acted as a magistrate. Together with Sir Stuart. A. Donaldson, and one or two other gentlemen, he commenced the Australian Club, of which he was a member as long as he lived. In 1853. Captain Finch was elected, on the retirement of Mr. Bettington, member of the Legislative Council, then the sole chamber of legislation, for the counties of Wellington and Bligh. He held this seat until the introduction of the new Constitution of two Houses, when he was succeeded by Mr. G. W. Lord as representative of that part of the country, now chiefly comprised in the Electorate of the Bogan. In June 1860, upon the decease of the late Major Lockyer, and the consequent promotion of Major Shadforth, the former Sergeant-at Arms, to the position of Usher of the Black Rod, which he still holds, Captain Finch was appointed by the Cowper Government, Sergeant-at-Arms in the Legislative Assembly, and held this office until his decease. Though the labour of this position was not severe, the tedium of some of the long night sittings must have been no joke to one whose duty, required his constant presence in the House. Honorable members can retire and return to the chamber, at will ; even the Speaker obtains a release, whenever the House goes into Committee. But for the Sergeant-at-Arms, there is no exemption from the burden of perpetual vigilance, until the House adjourns. It was the lot of Captain Finch, on two or three occasions, to be in attendance throughout sittings of twenty-four hours, sittings which were superseded by the arrival of the time when the next , day s sitting commenced, involving the necessity of other six or ten hours attendance with out intermission. In private life his exemplary deportment and amiable disposition won for him the affection of those who knew him best. In the discharge of his public duties, he maintained his credit as a faithful officer of the State. He died on the 6th May, 1873, the day of the public funeral of Mr. Wentworth.



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