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Item:63622
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:1827 6 June
Place:Sydney
Source:The Australian
Details:Sailed on the ship 'Australia' for London
Item:65035
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:1833 11 January
Place:Maitland
Source:Australian
Details:Contributor to the Catholic chapel
Item:100445
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:-
Place:-
Source:Dawn in the Valley
Details:Wood., W. Allan., 'Dawn in the Valley', the Story of Settlement in the Hunter River Valley., Wentworth books, Sydney, 1972pp. 27, 299
Item:147665
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:1819 15 February
Place:Sydney
Source:CSI
Details:On list of applicants for renewal of spirit licences in Sydney (Reel 6006; 4/3499 p.318)
Item:147666
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:1821 22 September
Place:-
Source:CSI
Details:Innkeeper. On list of persons to receive grants of land in 1821 (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 pp.67, 71)
Item:163391
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:-
Date:22 October 1839
Place:-
Source:SG
Details:THE WATER POLICE.- Goodwin, the conductor of the Water Police, states, with regard to some remarks which appeared in our last with respect to that department, that the escape of LukeDillon from the Colony, was not owing to any want of vigilance on his part. He observes that in clearing out the schooner Jess, under the command of the Chevalier Dillon, for New Zealand, about three years ago, he discovered Luke Dillon on board, and being in-formed by the Clearing Officer of the Customs that Dillon had received an emancipation on condition that he should not leave the Colony, he apprehended him and brought him on shore, but let him go at large on reaching Sydney. In this proceeding Goodwin evidently acted wrong, he ought to have deposited the fellow in the watch-house until he had an opportunity of consulting the registers at Hyde Park Barracks as to the conditions of his emancipation. Goodwin thinks thatDillon eventually escaped in the above named vessel, which put back a few days afterwards leaky, but as she had obtained her clearance it was not his duty to examine her
Item:27915
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Boyd ?
Date:1821 ? March 31
Place:County of Northumberland, Parish of Gosforth
Source:Index to map of the country bordering upon the River Hunter... by Henry Dangar (London : Joseph Cross, 1828). p4
Details:Granted 300 acres of land. Annual Quit Rent 6s
Item:57550
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1832 October
Place:-
Source:CSOL Convicts 1832-33, 32/991
Details:To be employed as special constable taking prisoners to Port Macquarie
Item:64966
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1832 12 November
Place:Sydney
Source:SH
Details:The notorious Luke Dillon on board the hulk awaiting to be removed to Port Macquarie where he is to be constable'
Item:95712
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1832 3 January
Place:Port Macquarie
Source:SG
Details:By the Governor Phillips a cargo of fashionables, invalids and mad men, have been sent to Port Macquarie, to reflect on the past and think of the future. The same vessel takes nearly forty prisoners to Moreton Bay, among whom is that public of all characters, James Hardy Vaux. Among those destined for Port Macquarie, is Luke Dillon, a young man who appears fully sensible of his situation, and in whose behalf considerable interest has been taken in Sydney. The case of Dillon, in consequence of the discovery of new and important facts since the trial, is to undergo revisal before a high tribunal in England, and his friends look with confidence to the period when he will be restored to their society. The good effects which resulted at Wellington Valley, from the separation of persons of Dillon's character and former situation in life, from the mass of offenders, it is to be hoped, will be continued ; and in order to stimulate them to good conduct, their residence should be restricted to a particular period.
Item:129911
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1832 3 January
Place:-
Source:SG
Details:To be sent to Port Macquarie. 'A young man who appears fully sensible of his situation and in whose behalf considerable interest is taken in Sydney'. In consequence of new facts since the trial, is to undergo revisal before a high tribunal in England
Item:129912
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1839 19 October
Place:-
Source:SG
Details:'The notorious Luke Dillon whose person might have been known to everybody in Sydney, is understood to have made his escape from the colony
Item:129913
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1834 22 November
Place:Port Macquarie
Source:SG
Details:MR. LUKE DILLON. We feel infinite pleasure in copying the following paragraph from Stewart's Despatch. When the gratifying intelligence reached this country, the joy of the people for many miles around was un-bounded. Bonfires were lighted in every village, and the entire neighbourhood from Westmeath to Carnedoe was in a blaze.- Roscommon Journal, June 27th : - PARDON OF LUKE DILLON.- Many Unfounded rumours have been at various times spread respecting Mr. Luke Dillon since his banishment from this country. Applications for his pardon have been for some time under the consideration of Government, the result of which has been at length communicated by Lord Melbourne, in a letter just received at Dublin Castle. His Lordship's letter states, that on the fullest consideration of the documents laid before him, he has advised his Majesty to grant a pardon to Mr. Dillon, subject, however to the re- striction that he shall not be permitted to reside out of his Majesty's Australian dominions.-Stewart's Despatch Mr. Dillon, is now, we believe, at Port Macquarie.
Item:129914
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1837 14 October
Place:-
Source:SG
Details:Quote from James Mudies' 'Felonry of New South Wales' - An Irishman whose crime drew down on him the execration of all and who is now a regular frequenter of the billiard rooms, the theatre and other places of amusement
Item:129915
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1849 11 October
Place:-
Source:SMH
Details:Previousy convicted of rape and later given a pardon
Item:147668
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1831 31 December
Place:-
Source:The Sydney Monitor
Details:The Trial of Luke Dillon for rape at the Commission Court of Dublin
Item:163390
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1831
Place:-
Source:-
Details:LUKE DILLON. TRANSPORTED FOR RAPE. No person possessing the ordinary feelings of human nature can read the dreadful detail of this villain's detestable crime, without shuddering at the baseness of heart which prompted him to its commission. Few instances are to be found where the remorseless debauchee has resorted to means so horrid as those adopted by this youthful destroyer of female virtue ; and setting aside his age, and the respectability of his family, one is at a loss to discover a reason why the full sentence which the law awarded to his crime should not be carried out, and why a mitigated punishment of transportation only should have been inflicted upon him. He was tried at the Commission Court at Dublin on Thursday the 13th of April 1831, on a charge of feloniously violating the person of Miss Anna Frizell, a young lady of most respectable connexions and amiable disposition, and but twenty years of age. Upon his being placed at the bar, Dillon appeared to be only about twenty-one years of age. He advanced to the front of the dock with an air of the most unblushing effrontery. He was fashionably and gaily attired, and his appearance was highly prepossessing. Miss Frizell was the material witness against him; and her evidence detailed the whole of the connexion which had existed between her and the prisoner. She was frequently interrupted during her examination by her emotions ; and her answers were allowed to be repeated by Mr. West, king's counsel, who sat near her. From her statement it appeared, that she had been principally educated abroad, and that, after having passed" eight years in a convent in France, she returned to her father's house at Slapolin, near Howth, in the year 1828. She was occasionally in the habit of visiting her relations, Dr. and Mrs. O'Reardon, who resided in Moles worth-street, Dublin; and there she met the prisoner about two years before the trial. An acquaintance soon ripened into an intimacy ; and on her meeting him at a party at Mr. MacDonnel's, in Stephen's Green, whither she had accompanied Mrs, O'Reardon in October 1830, he professed himself to be her warm admirer. At her invitation he was to call upon her on the following day, for the purpose of receiving some letters which he had undertaken to convey to England for her ; but upon his knocking at the door, Dr.'O'Reardon presented himself, and denied her to him. On the 4th of November they again met, and the prisoner then accompanied her, and Mrs. O'Reardon, to a dinner party. They entered into conversation in the course of the evening ; and Dillon requested her to meet him on the following day, as he had something particular to say to her. She exhibited some hesitation in complying with this request ; but eventually she consented to an appointment in Kildare-street. She accordingly repaired to the spot; but it proved wet, and for shelter they entered a cottage which presented itself to them in a walk which they took. They remained there during two or three hours ; and in the course of that time the prisoner disclosed to lier his object in requesting her to meet him, which was to ask her hand in marriage. Her answer to him was that she should be very happy, provided he could obtain her father's consent ; but added, that if money was his object, he would be disappointed, as her father had a large family, and could not give her any considerable portion. He declared that he had no such sordid motive in view in making the offer which he presented to her, and that if he succeeded in gaining her affections with her hand, he should consider himself supremely happy, for he had money enough to support them both, and had besides very considerable expectations from his uncle. Before they quitted the cottage, he kissed her twice ; and as they drove away in a carriage, which he had sent for in consequence of the rain, he pressed her to marry him privately, as he was sure that her father would never consent to their union. The carriage drove on as Miss Frizell believed in the direction of Molesworth-street, but presently it stopped at a house in Capel-street ; and at the earnest solicitation of the prisoner, the young lady alighted to take some refreshment, receiving an assurance that she should immediately afterwards be conveyed home. She entered a house with the prisoner, and they were shewn into a back apartment by a young man, who was directed to bring some fish. They sat together for a time, and then Dillon left the room. He was away for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour ; but on his return lie said, that the evening was fine, and she could walk home. As she had taken no punch, however, he insisted that she should have a little warm wine and water ; and some was almost immediately brought by the waiter. Dillon then placed the glass to her lips, and held her head until she had swallowed full half the contents of the glass. She directly felt stupefied and faint, and became quite unconscious of what subsequently passed, until she found herself at night, undressed, and lying on a bed by the side of the prisoner, in a room above that in which they had been sitting. Frantic with terror, she sprang from the bed, and in her hurry rushed against the wall instead of going through the door. The prisoner ran after her, and seized her round the waist, saying it was all over then, and she might as well be quiet; but she screamed aloud. He dragged her away from the door with great violence, cursing and swearing at her all the time, and again threw her on the bed, where he completed an outrage, which, there was no doubt was a repetition only of an act of violence of which he had before been guilty. He put his hand upon her mouth to prevent her screaming, and swore to God that he would marry her the next morning. He, however, again repeated his violence, and detained her in bed until daylight, when he allowed her to rise ; and she ultimately left the house with him, under a promise that he would take her to Mr Kenrick, the priest, and marry her. This promise, however, he did not keep
Item:163392
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:20 July 1889
Place:-
Source:Bathurst Free Press
Details:'Luke Dillon 'was an Irish gentleman of good family. He had been sentenced to death in a case of assault (capital) on a lady in his own rank of life. This sentence was afterwards commuted to transportation for life At the time of his trial in Dublin, like the late Yelverton case it was quite a sensation one. I was induced to go onboard the convict ship that conveyed him to New South Wales in consequence of receiving-through him a letter from a friend at the Irish bar, Mr. Richard Farrell Chief Commissioner of the Insolvent Court in Ireland, who was a stranger to Dillon personally, but happened to be present at his trial. Mr. Farrell was induced to write solely from some serious doubts he entertained on the propriety of the conviction. That Dillon's case was morally bad and base in (the highest. degree there can, be no doubt; yet there was great imprudence on the part of the lady on whose account he was sentenced to death, that might, on calm judicial consideration, have reduced the offence from the character of a capital crime to one of seduction under aggravated circumstances. Mr. Farrell drew my particular attention to the remarkable feature in the case, that Dillon and this lady were refused admittance early in the afternoon at a respectable (hotel in Dublin, as they brought no luggage with them, and thereupon they walked together across the street, and were received at a public house, where the imputed offence was committed. Ordinary discretion should have prevented a lady so rejected from entering such a place. The authorities at home, on a subsequent review of the case, formed a less unfavourable opinion of Dillon's conduct than prevailed in Dublin during the sensation trial. A conditional pardon soon followed him to the colony, which set him at liberty within the limits of New South Wales. Had he remained a year or two longer he would have obtained an absolute one; but impatient of the restriction to remain in the colony, he escaped, and hence made his way to Dieppe in France never afterwards revisited any place within the realm of England. He was unobtrusive and well-conducted in the colony, and received much kindness from persons who had known his family in Ireland. I lately heard at Paris of his subsequent career. He assumed a fictitious name and married, at Dieppe, the daughter of one of the principal innkeepers of the town, After a residence of a few years there, his career became known to the innkeeper, who took his daughter and their children from him, and dismissed him from the house. Soon rafter wards Dillon became insane, was confined in a French Lunatic Asylum, arid-there died sometime ago in the prime of life.'
Item:163393
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:1831
Place:-
Source:-
Details:The witness was cross-examined at great length by Mr. Serjeant O'Loughlen, in the course of which she admitted having written a letter, of which the following is a copy, the day after the atrocities described in her evidence in chief : " My dearest Dillon Our car came in to-day. Fortunately papa did not come with it. I was wishing to see you, so I went to Home's, but you were out. I cannot tell you what torture I have been in since I parted with you. You may imagine I am nothing better ; you may guess the rest. If you value my life my honour ; everything depends upon you. I have thought of something that will, I think, do. I will see you to-morrow. When I see you I will . I was obliged to tell Maria (Mrs. O'Reardon) we were married. She is exceedingly ill. The Doctor thinks I was at a lady's in Gardiner-street, a Mrs. Dwyer's. He went to Mrs. Callaghan's himself, so I could not say I was there. For God's sake, meet me to-morrow, about twelve o'clock, at the end of the street, in Dawson-street, and I will, at least, be a little happier, for I am miserable now. Buy me a ring, and, for Heaven's sake, arrange everything. Recollect that you had (these words were scratched out) I am not to be trifled with. I am sure -papa would blow my brains out were he to know it. I, therefore, rely on your solemn promise last night ; and, once more, be punctual to the hour to-morrow. Really, I am almost dead with grief. Indeed, my dearest Dillon, on you depends my future happiness for life. Yours, " Saturday night. " Anna." " Luke Dillon, Esq., Home's Hotel, Usher's-island." In her further cross-examination, she affirmed she wrote to him in these affectionate terms because Mrs. O'Reardon told her, that if she called him a villain or a wretch, he would never come back to her ; and that she wrote the letter for the purpose of bringing him back. After she had been under examination and cross-examination upwards of five hours, her mother, Mrs. Frizell, and Mrs. O'Reardon, were examined, and they corroborated her testimony as far as they had any knowledge of the facts. For the defence, several persons from the hotel or house where the affair took place stated that the lady was a consenting party, and that no outrage had been committed. In their cross-examination, how ever, they prevaricated a good deal, and acknowledged visiting the prisoner in Newgate. Judge Torrens charged the jury in a luminous speech, who, after one hour and three quarters' deliberation, returned a verdict of Guilty, but strongly recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of his youth. On the next day he was brought up for judgment, when, in answer why sentence of death should not be passed on him, he replied, in a low, but rather firm voice, that standing in the awful situation in which he did, it was not for him to arraign the verdict of twelve men on their oaths, and he should, therefore, bow with submission to the sentence of the court.
Item:166978
Surname:Dillon
First Name:Luke
Ship:Bussorah Merchant 1831
Date:18 May 1831
Place:England
Source:The Derby Mercury
Details:The mercy of the crown has been extended to this culprit, and the sentence of death commuted to that of transportation for life. The decision of government was communicated to him on Wednesday, when his irons were struck off, and he was yesterday conveyed, handcuffed to a common felon, who was also sentenced to undergo the mitigated penalty of the law, from Newgate to the Essex hulk at Kingstown. His head was shaved, and he was dressed in the slop clothing provided by government for convicts under rule of transportation

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