Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

Search


First Name



Surname / Subject



Ship








Search Results



1  
 
Item: 77205
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 1804 9 October
Place: Newcastle
Source: HRA Series 1 vol. V, pp. 420 - 422
Details: Taking his passage to Newcastle in the 'Resource'. To be given every Assistance and to be victualled from the stores


 
Item: 77206
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 1804 5 November
Place: Newcastle
Source: HR NSW, Vol. V, King 1803, 1804, 1805. . 482 - 483.
Details: 'Since my return from Van Dieman's Land I have visited Hunter's River and examin'd all the branches as far as a very small boat could proceed. The unfriendly disposition of the natives, who even attacked my boat, rendered it unsafe for me to go far from the banks, or to trace any of the branches above where they are navigable. This excursion added about 50 species of plants to my collection, but in other departments absolutely nothing. For some months past I have not enjoyed good health. I have often been so weak as to be incapable of undertaking any laborious excursion. Caley has just returned successful from one that has been very fatiguing. - Correspondence of Robert Brown to Sir Joseph Banks dated 12 December 1804


 
Item: 167535
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 26 August 1804
Place: Sydney
Source: SG
Details: On Friday arrived the Ocean transport from River Derwent with Lieut. Bowen, late Commandant of the Settlement at Risdon Cove. In the same ship Lieut. Moore with the detachment from the NSW Corps on duty at Risdon Cove, with Mr. Jacob Mountgarrett, Surgeon, Mr. (Robert) Brown, Naturalist and several other persons who composed that settlement


 
Item: 167536
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 24 July 1803
Place: Sydney
Source: SG
Details: Captain Matthew Flinders put the Investigator out of Commission by discharging most of that Ships crrew into the Porpoise for whom room was made by the greater part of the Porpoise's people being discharged the Service at their own request. Dr. Brown, Naturalist, Mr. Bauer Natural History Painter; and Mr. Allen, miner to the Voyage of Discovery the Investigator was employed on, remain in the Colony until it is determined whether another ship is sent to complete the object of the Investigator's voyage


 
Item: 187594
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: -
Place: -
Source: The Journal of Botany, British and Foreign, Volume 13
Details: The late Sir R.I. Murchison, writing late in life about the early part of his scientific career in London from 1826 to 1838 says - I must specially dwell on the great botanist Robert Brown, who was chiefly to be met with at the Sunday breakfasts of Charles Stokes in Grays Inn......Robert Brown, though a quiet, sedate man, was full of dry humour, and told many a good story to his intimate friends, among whom I was delighted to be reckoned to the day of his death. I was one of the mourners at his burial at Kensal Green when this illustrious man had but a few old friends to pay the last honours


 
Item: 187595
Surname: Brown
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 10 June 1858
Place: -
Source: Magazine of Horticulture, Botany etc
Details: Mr. Robert Brown, the most eminent botanist of the day died at his residence in Dean Street London on Thursday 10 June 1858


 
Item: 167534
Surname: Brown (obit.,)
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 1858
Place: England
Source: The American Journal of Arts and Science
Details: -


 
Item: 169404
Surname: Brown (obit.,)
First Name: Robert
Ship: Investigator 1802
Date: 1858
Place: Buried at Kensal Green
Source: The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal:
Details: On the death of Sir Joseph Banks in 1823, Brown became, by his will, the possessor of the Banksian Herbarium for life (after which it was to pass to the British Museum), together with the remainder of the lease of Sir Joseph Bank's house in Soho Square, which had become the centre of London scientific society. Brown offered the Herbarium to the British Museum, on the condition that he should be appointed keeper, with a suitable salary, which offer was accepted. The Banksian Herbarium forms the most valuable part of the General Herbarium at the British Museum. He continued until his death to occupy that portion of, the house in Soho Square which looked into Dean Street, the remaining portion being let by him to the Linnean Society until the expiry of the lease, soon after which the Society removed to Burlington House, where apartments have been assigned to it by Government, as also to the Royal and the Chemical Societies. His interest in the progress of science, and especially in the Royal and Linnean Societies, continued unabated to the last; and his wonderful and almost unique powers of mind, his memory and his sagacity, remained wholly unimpaired till the very day of his decease. In the spring of this year he was attacked with bronchitis, from which he recovered, but which left him for some weeks in a very enfeebled state. Dropsy and loss of appetite supervened, under which he gradually sunk, suffering little pain, perfectly conscious of his condition, and retaining to the end his singularly placid demeanour, his affectionate interest in all who were dear to him, and a most tranquil and peaceful frame of mind. He died at the age of 83, surrounded by his collections, in the room which had previously been the library of Sir Joseph Banks. He was buried on 15th June in the cemetery at Kensal Green, and his funeral was attended by a large body of his scientific and personal friends. There are few men among us who, with an equal claim upon the gratitude of their fellow-countrymen, enjoyed less popularity, or obtained less consideration on the part of society in general, than the deceased. Beyond the narrow circle of scientific men his illustrious name was, and is, almost unknown in Great Britain; but go wherever you will on the continent of Europe, or the remotest corners of the globe where science is cultivated, and you will discover a familiarity with his writings and researches truly astonishing. Foreigners have often expressed their surprise on finding how little we seemed to appreciate this great naturalist; but the fact of the matter was, the deceased neither seemed to care to enjoy popularity, nor did he care to avail himself of all those well-known means by which people bring themselves into public notice. If at all ambitious of fame, he trusted to the more lasting immortality.



1