Free Settler or Felon?

Newcastle and Hunter Valley History

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Item: 126573
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: 1859 30 March
Place: Christ Church Newcastle
Source: SMH
Details: Marriage of Philip Francis Adams of Albury to Harriett Burnett, youngest daughter of the late Edward Biddulph, Commander R.N., on 24th March. Minister Rev. E. Yeatman


 
Item: 126576
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: 1901 26 June
Place: Sydney
Source: The Advertiser (Adelaide)
Details: Death of Philip Francis Adams, who for 20 years held the position of Surveyor General of NSW. Born in Suffolk, England in 1829 and arrived in Sydney in 1854. Became Surveyor General in 1866. Mr. Adams established trigonometrical systems of survey throughout the State


 
Item: 126577
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: 1868 27 March
Place: -
Source: SMH
Details: Appointed Surveyor General of NSW to take effect from 17th March


 
Item: 127974
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: 1859 24 March
Place: Christ Church Cathedral Newcastle
Source: Marriages Register Book of Christchurch Cathedral, Newcastle 1858 - 1868 p15
Details: Marriage of Philip Francis Adams and Harriette Biddulph


 
Item: 148464
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: -
Place: -
Source: Australian Dictionary of Dates and Men of the Time
Details: Born at Womill Hall, Co. Suffolk in 1828. Educated in Ireland. Emigrated to Canada in 1851 and then to the U.S and the California gold fields. After a few months in the South Seas he arrived in Sydney in 1854 and was appointed land surveyor in Maitland


 
Item: 174518
Surname: Adams
First Name: Philip Francis
Ship: -
Date: 6 December 1911
Place: Maitland
Source: NMH
Details: Philip Adams had an adventurous career. He was a native of Suffolk England, having been born at Womill Hall in 1828. The family removed to the north of Ireland in 1838 and ten years later, before Mr. Adams was 20 years of age he was entrusted with the work of land surveying. The potato blight caused stagnation in all professions in Ireland; and in 1851 he went to Canada and later to the United States where he engaged in his profession for a couple of years. The California gold rush was drawing thousands of men to the west and Mr. Adams was one of those who tried their fortunes there. He was, however, unsuccessful, and bad health caused him to leave the country. After spending a few months in the South Seas, he arrived in Sydney in 1854 and was appointed land surveyor for the Maitland district where as stated he remained until 1857. On the death of Sir Thomas Mitchell, Mr. Adams and three others were selected each to take charge of the surveys of one fourth of the colony. They commenced the Trigonometrical Survey but the death of the Surveyor General interrupted the work. Mr. Adams was recalled to Sydney in 1864 as Deputy Surveyor General and he became Surveyor General in 1868.



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