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Convict Ship Surgeons - M

 

A

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

 

 

Samuel Mackay Colin McLaughlin James Mileham
     
D. Mackenzie Robert McLean Andrew Millar
     
Robert Maclean John McMillan James Mitchell
     
Alexander C. Macleroy Daniel McNamara Andrew Montgomery
     
  James McTernan  James Moodie
     
George D. Maclaren Patrick McTernan J. Morgan
     
Benjamin McAvoy J.O. McWilliam John Morgan
     
George McClure Patrick Magovern James Morice
     
Robert McCrea Henry Mahon Harvey Morris
     
W. McCrea Maine John Mortimer
     
Thomas Wallis McDonald Robert Malcolm John Arnold Mould
     
William McDonald William Marshall Jacob Mountgarrett
     
William McDowell William Martin George Todd Moxey
     
Alexander McKechnie Martin Mason John Munro
     
James McKerrow Patrick Martyn  
     
Allen McLaren James A Mercer  

 

 *Date of Seniority Royal Navy  

 


MACKAY, Samuel R.N., *22 July 1806

 

Samuel Mackay was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Waverley to Van Diemen's Land in 1842 .

On 25th August and 1st September 1842 one hundred and forty seven female convicts and forty of their children were embarked on the Waverley from the depot at Grange Gorman Lane, Dublin, all in a healthy state. The Waverley departed Dublin 4th September 1842.

There was fine weather for most of the voyage to Australia and therefore the prisoners and children were allowed on deck from 9 am to 6pm when they were mustered and returned to the prison for the night.

There were only eleven cases in the surgeon's journal and one death, that of a young boy.

Samuel Mackay was careful to keep the prison clean and well ventilated and the convicts arrived at the Derwent on 15th December 1842 in a healthy state.

 

 

 

 

 

MACKENZIE, D
 

D. Mackenzie was employed as surgeon on the Earl Spencer in 1813

 

 

MACLEAN, (MCLEAN) Robert

 

Robert Maclean was appointed surgeon to the Tory 1847 (VDL) 

 

 

 

MACLEROY, Alexander C.
 

Alexander Macleroy was appointed to the Phoebe 1845 ( VDL)

 

 

 

MACLAREN, George David

 

George D. Maclaren was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841.  He was appointed to the Magicienne. He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the William Hammond in 1856 (to Western Australia) 

He was listed in the Medical Registry 1865 - Staff Surgeon, Royal Navy. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Surgeons, Edinburgh 1827

 

 

MCAVOY, Benjamin R.N., * 5 April 1830

 

Benjamin McAvoy was on the list of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841.

He was appointed Surgeon to the Modeste in 1842

 

 

MCLURE, George R.N., * 24 July 1810

 

George McLure was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

George McClure was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ships Westmoreland in 1838 and Nautilus in 1840.

Before he departed on the Westmoreland a Public Dinner was given at Clawson's Hotel, Newtonbreda....... The party consisted of about 110 persons and embraced the Clergy of the Established and Presbyterian churches, several Magistrates, and a number of merchants and professional gentlemen and the most influential farmers of the neighborhood. William Boyd of Fortbreda, Esq., presided; he was supported by Samuel Cleland, of Stormont . The respectability of the assembly the harmonious blending together of so many persons of different opinions in religion and politics and the kindness that distinguished the entire proceedings of the evening bore testimony in favour of Surgeon McClure's well deserved popularity over a very large district of the wealthiest and best informed part of Ireland. After the usual loyal and patriotic toasts the Chairman prefaced the health of their guest by saying he felt assured he spoke the sincere opinions of all present in expressing deep regret at the loss which they were about to sustain in the departure of Surgeon McClure. Whilst the nation would be benefitted by a gentleman of his intelligence and experience going into active service, a large district of country would meet with a heavy deprivation. Surgeon McClure's skill, zeal, unwearied labour and humanity were the theme of general praise and universal gratitude.  After the continued cheering had subsided, Surgeon McClure, evidently much affected, expressed the deep sense of gratitude he entertained for this distinguished mark of  private affection and kindness. He felt he was surrounded by friends from whom he was about to be painfully separated, but he new he was about to engage in a public service, from which no good officer should ever flinch (cheers). To he and to his family it was a source of much gratification to find that during his residence in this enlightened part of Ireland he had so deported himself as to obtain the good opinion of so many persons of rank, influence, and moral worth. When he returned he trusted he would again enjoy the same enviable station. Surgeon McClure sat down amid long continued cheers...... Belfast Newsletter 3 April 1838.

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841.

He died in September or October 1849 (Morning Post 2 October 1849)

 

 

 
MCCREA, Robert
 

Employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Eden in 1849 (VDL & Port Phillip). Left vessel at the Cape because of illness

 

 

MCCREA, W.
 

 

 

 

MCDONALD, Thomas Wallis R.N., *9 November 1830
 

Thomas Wallis McDonald was appointed to the Brisk in 1834.....

Thomas Wallis McDonald was Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Hindostan in 1839 and Lord Lyndoch 1841, both to Van Diemen's Land 

 

 

 

MCDONALD, William 

 

William McDonald (*21 June 1793) was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

William McDonald was appointed Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Fanny in 1816 and the Larkins in 1817

 

 

MCDOWELL, William R.N. *17 August 1815
 

William McDowell was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Hewas employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships:

Lady East departed England 16 December 1823 and arriving in Hobart on 9 April 1824. Medical Journal from 16th September 1823 to 4 May 1824

Harmony  departed London 4 June 1827 and arrived in Port Jackson on 27 September 1827

Diamond  departed Cork 29 November 1837 and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 March 1838. He returned to England on the Spartan in November 1838

Blenheim  departed Dublin 19 May 1839 and arrived in Port Jackson on 27 September 1839

Duncan which departed Sheerness 16 December 1840 and arrived in Hobart 18 April 1841

Triton from London which arrived in Hobart on 19 December 1842.

William McDowell was on the List of the Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were unfit for service in 1841 & 1852

From the London Times in 1893.........McDowell - On the 22nd December 1893, Agnes Grant Eaymond McDowell, of Streatham, daughter of the late William McDowell M.R.C.S., R.N. (The Times 28 December 1893)

MCKECHNIE, Alexander *21 July 1830
 

Alexander McKecknie was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Mandarin to Van Diemen's Land in 1840

He departed the colony in August 1840 on the Pilgrim bound for Liverpool with Drs. Mahon and Toms.

He was employed as Surgeon on the Layton also to VDL in 1841.

He was listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence 3 Queen's Place, Southsea, Hants & Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets. Qualifications -   Lic. Fac. Phys. Surg. Glasgow 1821. M.D. University Glasg. 1829. Mem Royal College Phys. london 1860.

 

 

 

 

MCKERROW, James
 

James McKerrow was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 11 June 1811

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Earl St. Vincent in 1826 (to VDL)  and the John to New South Wales in 1827.

 

 

MCLAREN, Allen (Allan)   R.N., * 17 July 1824

 

Allen McLaren was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 19 May 1812.

He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent to the Hydery to Van Diemen's Land in 1832

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Maitland to Norfolk Island and New South Wales and kept a medical journal from 21st July 1843 to 23 March 1844.

 

 

 

 

MCLAUGHLIN, Colin
 

Colin McLaughlin was employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Broxbornebury in 1814

 

 

MCLEAN, (MACLEAN) Robert

 

Robert McLean was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Tory to Van Diemen's Land in 1847

 

 

MCMILLAN (MACMILLAN), John R.N., * 5 December 1807

 

John McMillan was appointed to the Navy on 5th December 1807.

He was appointed to the position of surgeon on the Buffalo at Portsmouth in 1807(152)

He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

John McMillan was employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Speke in 1808. In Australia he joined the ship Porpoise.

John McMillan was employed on the Lord Melville to Van Diemen's Land in 1818

He was on the navy list of surgeons unfit for duty in 1847

 

 

MCNAMARA, Daniel R.N., * 11 February 1812

 

Daniel McNamara was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Daniel McNamara was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Lord Melville  in 1817, Canada  in 1819 and the John Barry in 1821.

 

 
MCTERNAN, James R.N., * 18 August 1813

 

J. McTernan was on the List of Medical Officers who had served at war. He was Assistant Surgeon of the Northumberland at the destruction of two French frigates and a brig off L'Orent in 1812, and Surgeon of the Dragon in all the important operations in the Chesapeake and coast of America, including the capture of Bangor, Hampden etc.

 Mass Casualties, a Lessons Learned Approach: Accidents, Civil Disorders ... By R Adams Cowley, Sol Edelstein, Martin Elliot Silverstein

James McTernan was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Ocean in 1823 and the Sir Charles Forbes in 1827 (to VDL)

James McTernan returned to England on the vessel Elizabeth in November 1827. Surgeon William Rae returned on the same vessel.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Asia 1828,   Eliza 1829  Lady Harewood 1831  John Barry 1836  all to New South Wales and the Sara in 1837 to Van Diemen's Land.

James McTernan was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841. He was appointed to the Packet service at Falmouth.

He was appointed surgeon of Deptford Dockyard in 1845 having previously been employed at Greenwich Hospital. (Lancet)

James McTernan was on the List of Deputy Inspectors General of Hospitals and Fleets Retired (25 July 1855)

He was a colleague and friend of Sir Alexander Nisbett.

He died in 1873.

 

 ...The Lancet

 

 
MCTERNAN, Patrick
 

Patrick McTernan was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 8 October 1811

He was appointed to the Eden in 1822 (The Morning Chronicle 3 October 1822)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Mariner  in 1827 to New South Wales; the Manlius to Van Diemen's Land in 1828; and the Katherine Stewart Forbes in 1830 and Dunvegan Castle in 1832 to New South Wales.

In all 737 prisoners arrived in Australia under his care and only four men were lost overall. He allowed whatever comforts he could devise for the men and he believed in allowing them on deck frequently.

News reached New South Wales in November 1834 of the death of Patrick McTernan.

 

 

 
MCWILLIAM, James Ormiston

 

James Ormiston McWilliam was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Forfarshire in 1843 (to VDL) and the Hydrabad to Norfolk Island in 1845

 

   

 

MAGOVERN, Patrick  R.N., *16 March 1814

 

Patrick MacGovern was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Patrick Magovern was appointed Surgeon to the Primrose in 1817 (Hampshire Telegraph 7 April 1817)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Minerva in 1839

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841 and 1843

His Obituary appeared in The London Medical Gazette. He died in 1849 at his lodgings 23 Elizabeth Street, Pimlico. He was formerly of the county of Cavan in Ireland and brother of the late Roman Catholic Bishop of Ardagh.

 

 

 

 
MAHON, Henry Walsh (M.D.)  R.N., *7 October 1835

 

Henry W. Mahon was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Isabella  in 1840

He departed the colony in August 1840 on the Pilgrim bound for Liverpool with Drs. McKechnie and Toms.

He was appointed to the Mexborough convict ship in 1841

He was Surgeon on the Barossa in 1842. The Barossa arrived on the evening of 13th January 1842 with 348 male convicts. (VDL)

 A case of ScurvyDescription: Page from the journal of Henry Walsh Mahon showing the effects of scurvy, from his time aboard HM Convict Ship Barrosa

Henry Mahon is listed in the Medical Register 1865 - Residence Surgeon R.N., Westport Co. Mayo. Qualifications Member 1828 Fellow 1844, Roy. College Surgeons Eng. Member Royal College Phys. London 1841. Lic. Midwif. K.Q. College Phys. Ireland 1863.

No.3934 In Memoriam | HENRY WALSH MAHON | Surgeon R.N. | who departed this life | 9th March 1878 | in the 70th year of his age | "Rest for the weary"...Headstones Mount Jerome Cemetery

 

 
MAINE

 

Indian 1810

 

 

MALCOLM, Robert  R.N., *3 September 1819
 

Robert Malcolm was appointed Assistant Surgeon 10 June 1812.

He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Sovereign in 1827 (to VDL). The Sovereign under Captain Mackeller departed London 22nd July 1827 and arrived 19th November with 81 female prisoners. Passengers included Rev. W. Yate and Missionaries Mr. and Mrs. Butler, John Abbott and Peter Ogilvie.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Nithsdale  to N.S.W. in 1830

Robert Malcolm was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

It was possibly this Robert Malcolm who bequeathed 1000 to the Naval School to found a university scholarship

 

MARSHALL, William Barrett

 

William Barrett Marshall was appointed Assistant-Surgeon in the Royal Navy 10 June 1824

He published Tears for Pity, a volume of poetry in 1824

 

His article on Medical Education was published in the Lancet in 1827

In 1832 he was employed as assistant-surgeon on H.M.S. Dover moored in the River Thames. He contributed correspondence to the Lancet regarding the reported circumstances of cholera on the Dover

He was surgeon on the convict ship Fanny in 1833

William Marshall was surgeon on H.M.S. Alligator in 1834. He spoke at the 14th anniversary of the Van Diemen's Land Auxiliary Bible Society at the Court House in Hobart in January 1834. The Hobart Town Courier thought he was the most eloquent speaker of the evening, who though yet a young man, whose studies had been mainly devoted to the medical profession, was evidently a divine of no mean acquirements.

He was surgeon on the Alligator when that vessel was sent to rescue the wife and child of the captain of a whaling vessel who were said to be held captive by Maoris. The rescue mission turned violent and William Marshall later wrote of the situation in A Personal Narrative of Two Visits to New Zealand in His Majesty's Ship Alligator in 1834 .

Correspondence of William Barrett Marshall of H.M.S. Soudan on the benefits of Vaccination for Smallpox in Africa (1841)

 

 

 

MARTIN, William R.N.,

 

There were to surgeons entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814 (William Martin (1) * 12 February 1804 and William Martin (2) *17 August 1815)

William Martin was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Hercules in 1830

 

MASON, Martin
 

More about Martin Mason

Martin Mason was employed as surgeon on the Britannia in 1798

 

 

 

MARTYN, Patrick R.N., * 26 January 1833  (Sources)

 

Patrick Martyn was born in Ireland c. 1804.

He was promoted from Assistant-Surgeon to the position of Surgeon in 1833

He may have been appointed to the vessel Tribune in 1836

Patrick Martyn was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Neptune in 1838

In 1841 he was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service. He was appointed to the Cleopatra

He was Candidate for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine, University of London 1844. Second Division. School of Physic in Ireland (The Lancet)

He was appointed to the Imaum in 1847 (108)

The Lancet of 1850 contains an interview about his views on the allowance of spirits in the navy......

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Martyn can be found in the 1851 Census at  Bennett Street St. George, Hanover Square, Mayfair. He resides with his wife Elizabeth and nephew Richard McCormick who is a surgeon. Patrick gives his age as 47 and birthplace Ireland. Elizabeth is 31 and was born in Middlesex. They employ two servants.

He was on the Navy List of surgeons fit for service in 1852

He is listed in the British Medical Directory 1853....Patrick Martyn,  Bennett Street, St. James's London, M.D. London and France; Surgeon R.N.,

In 1855 he was appointed to the vessel Powerful (109)

He published  The Function of the Thyroid Body 1857

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy retired in 1864.

In the Medical Times and Gazette in 1866 he is mentioned in correspondence regarding retirement and pensions awarded to Surgeons of the Royal Navy........

 

Patrick Martyn is listed in the Medical Register 1865 -  Residence 7 Bennett Street, St. James's, London. Qualifications M.D. University London 1844.

He is mentioned in 1869 as having many years previously been an assistant to Dr. James Scott at the Haslar Hospital

 

MERCER, James A * 9 February 1815

 

James Alexander Mercer was appointed supernumerary to the vessel Tagus in 1810. He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers of 1814

James A. Mercer was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Asia convict ship which arrived in Port Jackson on 24 July 1822. 189 prisoners arrived at Port Jackson, one having died on the passage.

His next appointment as Surgeon Superintendent was to the Albion in 1823. The Hobart Town Gazette reported the arrival - On Tuesday last arrived from England the transport ship Albion, Captain W.R. Best, with 202 male convicts, two of whom having been taken in at the Cape of Good Hope, at which port she touched on her passage, during which no deaths have been experienced on board. The Albion left Portsmouth on 27th May 1823 and brings out a guard of 32 rank and file of the 40th Regiment under orders of Lieut. Lowe of the same Regiment. Passengers Mr. and Mrs. Sweetman and three daughters.

James Mercer was allowed the usual 50 passage money by government to return to England and in January 1824 he sailed for England via the Cape on the ship Berwick.

He arrived again on the Asia (1) on 21st February 1825 with 190 male prisoners from Ireland.

 

 

MILEHAM, James
 

James Mileham was employed as surgeon on the Ganges in 1797

In 1804 he accompanied Lieutenant Charles Menzies on his historic voyage up to the Coal River settlement

 

Sentence and Reprimand of Assistant-Surgeon Mileham in May, 1805...........

The sentence of the General Court-Martial held for the Trial of Mr. Mileham, Assistant Surgeon, viz. :

The Court having maturely and deliberately considered the Evidence for and against the Prisoner, as well as what he had to offer in his Defence, is of opinion that he is Guilty of the first Charge, viz., for disobedience of Orders in refusing to attend a patient in the General Hospital on the 13th of April, 1805, do therefore sentence him to be publickly Reprimanded by the Commander-in-Chief.

The Court is of Opinion that he is further guilty of the second Charge, viz., for Neglect of Duty in not attending a Woman when in labour in the General Hospital on the 13th of April, 1805, do therefore Sentence him to be publickly reprimanded by the Commander-in-Chief; is fully approved of, and the Court- Martial dissolved. The Governor and Commander-in-Chief has to observe that the Proofs are so clear in substantiating Mr. Mileham's disobedience of the Principal Surgeon's Orders in a case when his Duty and Humanity equally required his prompt obedience that he entirely disapproves of Mr. Mileham's want of a due Subordination to the directions of his superior in the execution of his Duty.

The Governor perfectly coincides with the Court-Martial in considering Mr. Mileham Guilty of a neglect of Duty in not  attending a Woman in labour in the General Hospital, from which conduct the Woman's Life and that of her offspring might have been endangered ; and as Mr. Mileham has recently endeavoured to evade his Duty when ordered, the Commander-in-Chief considers it necessary to inform that Mileham that on his incurring any future Censure for neglect of Duty or Disobedience of Orders it will become necessary to suspend him from his situation as Assistant Surgeon till His Majesty's Commands are received thereon.  - HRA, Series 1, Vol. 5, p. 426

James Mileham at the Australian Dictionary of Biography Online

 

 

 

MILLAR, Andrew R.N., *31 July 1833

 

Andrew Millar was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for active service in 1841. He was appointed to the Carysfort.

He was employed on the convict ship Anson which departed Plymouth 1 October 1843 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land 4th February 1844 with 499 male prisoners. Passenger Captain Cocknaft with soldiers women and children. In all 830 people.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Tasmania) wrote in February 1844......."Our splendid wharfs were crowded with promenaders on Sunday afternoon, to obtain a sight of H.M.S. Anson, once a 72 line of battle ship, and which has often carried the thunder of Britain amongst her foes. How different now her destiny! - employed as a receptacle for those degenerate Englishmen who have been spurned from the bosom of society. By this arrival 500 men have been added to our convict population. The Anson is the largest vessel which has ever been in our harbour, and is commanded by Captain Coghlan, half brother as we understand to Mr. Driscoll, the respected Manager of the Colonial Bank. With prisoners, guard, crew and passengers , she has nearly a thousand souls on board. Mr. Forster a son of the A.P.M. of Brighton acted as chaplain on the voyage out. The Anson is an old vessel and masted with the spars of one of the old 42's her own spars being too heavy for a merchant crew to handle properly. She left Plymouth on the 1st October, and put into Rio Janeiro, where she remained 14 days. The Anson is to be employed as a hulk for the reception of female probationers. The Troops on board consisted of part of the 51st, 58th 96th and 99th regiments.

 

 

 

MITCHELL, James R.N., *8 March 1817
 

James Mitchell was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 22 November 1809

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Neptune  in 1820, Guildford  in 1822, and the Guildford in 1824.

 

 

MONTGOMERY, Andrew
 

Andrew Montgomery was born in Eniskillen,  Ireland c. 1792 (1851 Census). He was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 20 November 1813 and was promoted to the position of surgeon in 1817

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Elizabeth in 1820. The Elizabeth departed the Downs 18 August 1820 and arrived in Port Jackson on 31 December 1820.

Soon after arrival in New South Wales, he joined Philip Parker King's fourth and last survey expedition. His appointment to the Bathurst survey vessel was officially announced in England in the newspapers in October 1821, however by this time the expedition was already over....

.....They embarked on the Bathurst, a 170 ton teak built vessel which had recently been considerably repaired at Calcutta. Philip Parker King wrote that by this vessel they gained a great addition to their comforts; and, besides increasing the number of their crew, were much better off in regard to boats; for they now possessed a long boat large enough to carry out and weigh an anchor, or save the crew if any accident should happen to the vessel; a resource they had not possessed in the previous vessel the Mermaid. Perceval Baskerville one of the Dromedary's midshipmen joined the expedition and Andrew Montgomery joined the expedition in place of surgeon Mr. Hunter. Others on the vessel included Frederick Bedwell, John S. Roe, and Allan Cunningham.....After experiencing many tedious and unexpected delays in equipping the Bathurst, notwithstanding our wants were few, and the greater part of our repairs were effected by our own people, we were not completed for sea until the 26th May, when we sailed from Port Jackson upon our fourth and last voyage to the north coast.....

Boongaree, the native who had formerly accompanied us, volunteered his services whilst the vessel was preparing for the voyage, which I gladly accepted; but when the day of the departure drew nigh he kept aloof; and the morning that we sailed his place was filled by another volunteer, Bundell; who proved not only to be a more active seaman, but was of much greater service to us than his countryman Boongaree had been . This addition made our number thirty three.

Three day after we left the port a discovery was made of another addition to the number of the crew. Upon opening the hold, which had been locked ever since the day before we sailed, a young girl, not more than fourteen years of age was found concealed among the casks, where she had secreted herself in order to accompany the boatswain to sea; upon being brought on deck she was in a most pitiable plight, for her dress and appearance were filthy from four days close confinement in a dark hold, and from having been dreadfully seasick the whole time, that her acquaintances of which she had many on board, could scarcely recognise her. Upon being interrogated she declared she had, unknown to all on board, concealed herself in the hold the day before the vessel sailed; and that her swain knew nothing of the step she had taken. As it was now inconvenient to return to put her on shore, and as the man consented to share his ration with her, she was allowed to remain; but in a very short time heartily repented of her imprudence, and would gladly have been re-landed had it been possible.

On 23 June 1821 a boat conveyed Mr. Montgomery and Mr. Cunningham to Clack's Island. The reef abounded with shells, of which they brought back to the Bathurst a large collection

On 7th August they came across some natives....By this time Mr. Montgomery and Mr. Bedwell joined us; the latter gentleman was unarmed, but the former had a pistol concealed under his coat, and carried a fish which he held out for them to take; but, as they would not approach us nearer than two or three yards, he threw it towards them, when the shortest native picked it up. Upon this accession to our numbers, they began to to talk to each other, and, at the same time, picked up their spears; but, as the latter appeared only to be a cautionary movement, we did not anticipate their mischievous intentions. I then, with a view to amuse them, made signs to my friend for the knife, which he put into my hands without shewing the least reluctance, upon which he was again instructed how to open and shut it; but as this, instead of pacifying, only served to increase their anger, the knife was thrown at his feet, which he instantly picked up, and then both retired a few paces in a very suspicious manner.

We were at this time about three or four yards from the natives, who were  talking to each other in a most animated way, and evidently intent upon some object; and, as it appeared probable that, if we remained any longer, a fracas would ensure, it was proposed that our party should retire to the boat, under the idea that they would follow us down; no sooner, however, had we waved to them our farewell, and turned our backs to descend the rocks, than they unexpectedly, and in the most treacherous manner, threw their spears; one of which, striking a rock, broke and fell harmless to the ground, but the other, which was thrown by the tallest man, wounded Mr. Montgomery in the back; the natives then, without waiting to throw their second spears, made off, closely pursued by Bundell, who had armed himself with the broken spear; but they were out of slight in a moment, and, by the time that the muskets were brought to our assistance, were doubtless out of gun shot.

We returned to the boat, to which Mr. Montgomery had been in the mean time carried, complaining of great weakness from loss of blood.

Upon examining Mr. Montgomery's wound, which unfortunately was in such a part of his body that he could not himself inspect it, it appeared that the spear had penetrated about three inches; and, from the quantity of extravasated blood, great fears were entertained that he had received a very serous internal injury.

The wound, from which he was suffering very great pain, was dressed according to his instructions but it was several days before he considered himself out of danger.

Andrew Montgomery did recovered from his wounds and in 1825 wrote - Some Interesting Particulars regarding the Nature and Curer of the Cholera morbus while employed as Medical Officer in charge of the Town and District of Chanda near Nagpore.

In the 1851 Census Andrew Montgomery can be found residing with his cousin 86 year old William Henry Phibbs, a gentleman of private means at Clay Hill, Bushey, Hertfordshire. He is 57 years old and gives his occupation as retired Inspector of Hospitals, Bombay establishment. They employed a housekeeper.

In the 1861 Census he resides in Bath, Somersetshire with his wife Emma. He is 67 and Emma 47. He gives his occupation as Retired Inspector of Hospitals, Bombay. An unmarried sister-in-law Susanne Richards resides with them and they employ a cook, housemaid and parlour maid.

 

 

MOODIE, John. R.N., *20 July 1838

 

John Moody (Moodie) was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent to the Childers.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Lord Auckland in 1849 (VDL);  and the Blackfriar in 1851 (VDL)

John Moody is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence Melville Hospital, Chatham. Qualifications: Surgeon in the Navy, 1838. Mem Royal College Surgeons Eng. 1850.

 

 

 

MORGAN, John.,  R.N.

 

Employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Mary which arrived in Sydney in August 1819. In October the Sydney Gazette reported that he was 'labouring under the deplorable calamity of violent mental derangement' and three fellow Royal Navy surgeons were assembled to assess his condition - Daniel Macnamara, Lancelot Armstrong and James Bowman - (Sydney Gazette 16 October 1819). Mrs. Mary White was paid from the Police Fund for laundry expenses at her house for Dr. Morgan incurred when he was ill.

John Morgan departed the colony on the Tuscan in July 1820 under the care of surgeon James Marr Brydone.

 

 

 

MORGAN, John

 

John Morgan was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Captain Cook in 1833

 

MORICE, James *17 August 1815

 

James Morice was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

James Morice was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Midas in 1827

He is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence Elgin. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Surgeons, Edinburgh 1821., M.D. University K. College Aberdeen 1826.

(The Assistant-Surgeon James Morice who was promoted to Surgeon on 31st December 1841 is probably a different man)

 

 

 

MORRIS, Harvey  *20 July 1838

 

Harvey Morris was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was appointed to the Racer.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the David Malcolm in 1845 (to Norfolk Island)

Harvey Morris kept a Medical Journal on the Bangalore to Hobart from 5th January 1848 to 22 September 1848. With the approval of Governor Charles Fitz roy, he returned to England in the Calcutta

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Rodney to Van Diemen's Land in 1851. One of the prisoners of the Rodney Charles Dawnes was photographed in 1874 and the image is included on the National Library of Australia site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORTIMER, John  R. N., *17 February 1806

 

1809.......

 .....The code of health and longevity: or, A general view of the rules and ... By Sir John Sinclair

1810....Surgeon at the hospital at Martinique (Naval Chronicle)

1814  .....John Mortimer was assigned as Surgeon to the hospital at Barbadoes

1816....He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Fame. The Fame departed England on 9 October 1816 and arrived in Port Jackson on 8th March 1817.

1820 .....he was practising at Torrington.......(click on the text below to read more)

 

1829.....John Mortimer was on the List of Gentlemen  who passed their Surgical Examinations at Edinburgh - August 2 1829 - Since August 1828, the following Gentlemen, two hundred and four in number, have appeared before the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, and having produced certificates of their completing the course of study prescribed by the College, and having been admitted on examination, have been found fully qualified to practise the arts of Anatomy, Surgery, and Pharmacy, and have received Diplomas accordingly. (Edinburgh medical and Surgical Volume.)

1831 he was employed as Surgeon to the Haslar Hospital (The Lancet).

1840 - He was appointed Deputy Inspector of Hospitals on 22 August 1840 (Haslar Hospital)...Navy List

1846 - Appointed Medical Inspector of Hospitals and Fleets on 9th November 1846 (Navy List)

1856 - He died at Gosport age 74 on 20 April 1856 (Gentleman's Magazine)

 

 

MOULD, John Arnold *7 August 1827

 

John Arnold Mould was born in Devon c. 1807.

He was on the return of Officers of the Medical Department of the Navy promoted from Assistant-Surgeon to Surgeon on 20 July 1838 (Hampshire Telegraph 30 July 1838)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Sir Robert Peel in 1845. The Sir Robert Peel departed London on 9 September 1844 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land on 26 December 1844.

John Mould's wife Anne, daughter of John Borlase of Castle Horneck, Penzance, Cornwall died at Myrtle Cottage, Paignton in 1849 (Royal Cornwall Gazette 2 February 1849)

In the 1851 Census John Mould resided at Stoke Damerel, Devon. He gives his age as 44 and status widower. His brother Thomas age 35 (a dentist), sister Elizabeth age 32, sister Louisa age 27, daughters Sarah age 11 and Anne age 9 reside with him. They have two servants. He stated his occupation as Surgeon R.N. half pay.

John's brother William Pattison Mould was also a surgeon. In the 1851 census he resided at Plymstock, Devon and gives his age as 44. His wife Mary is 43 and they have daughters Fanny age 8 and Sarah age 1 and sons Pentland age 6 and William age 4.

John Arnold Mould was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1852.

He was on the List of Officers, Crew and Marines on board a vessel at Malta when the 1861 UK Census was taken. He gave his age as 54 and status married.

He was on the list of Deputy Inspectors General of Hospitals and Fleets Retired (28 July 1862)

He was listed in the Medical Register 1865 - Deputy Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets. Qualifications Member Royal College Surgeons Eng. 1830.

John Arnold Mould died on 19th June 1878 at Plympton St. Mary, Co. Devon. Administration of his Personal Estate was granted to Captain William Mould, R.N. of Tonbridge Wells, Kent, brother of the deceased. (45)

 

 

 

MOUNTGARRETT, Jacob
 

Jacob Mountgarrett was employed as surgeon on the Glatton which departed England on 23 September 1802 and arrived in Sydney Cove 11 March 1803

In 1804 he was appointed surgeon at the new settlement at Port Dalrymple. He was succeeded in this appointment by Robert Espie in 1820.

Joseph Arnold who arrived as surgeon on the Northampton in 1815 mentions Mountgarrett in his journal.....Mr. Mountgarret was long a Surgeon in the Navy, but has been several years chief Surgeon at the Derwent, he has been a great Speculator, but has not made a fortune, rather has lost one after having gained it. He put himself under my direction for a diseased fore finger two of the bones of which have separated & the other is carious. I was not able to determine the nature of the disease, he had received a wound from the Saw when assisting at the Amputation of a man who is said to have laboured under the disease of the Skin, & this wound has been followed by the disease just mentioned. The hand itself was much swelled & there were purple spots on the back of it, so that amputation in my opinion, unless of the whole hand, was inadvisable. He had tried Mercury without effect, I advised an application of powdered charcoal & hot fomentations but I fear with little prospect of relief. State Library of NSW

Find out more about Jacob Mountgarrett at the Australian Dictionary of Biography

 

 

MOXEY, George Todd  R.N., *20 August 1829  (Sources)

 

George Todd Moxey was from East Lothian.

Surgeons' Hall, Edinburgh - In 1819 he was on the list of Gentlemen who appeared before the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and produced certificates of their completing the course of Study prescribed by the College and been admitted on examination. He was fully qualified to practise the arts of Anatomy, Surgery and Pharmacy and received a diploma accordingly. (106)

University of Edinburgh -  In 1821 he was on list of Gentlemen who were conferred the degree of Doctor in Medicine having gone through their appointed examinations and publicly defended their Inaugural Dissertations:   - Puerperatum Hysteritide - (107)

In November 1822 George Todd Moxey was promoted from Surgeon's Mate to Assistant surgeon (52) and then surgeon on 20 August 1829.

He was appointed to the Samarang in 1831 which was ordered home in 1834.

 

He was appointed surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Margaret  which departed Kingstown on 1 September 1838 and arrived in Port Jackson 5th January 1839. He was next appointed to the Woodbridge  which departed Sheerness 12 October 1839 and arrived in Port Jackson 26 February 1840. His next appointment was to the Susan which departed Plymouth 24 April 1842 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land 25 July 1842.

His last appointment on a vessel to Australia was the Mount Stewart Elphinstone which departed England on 26th May 1849 and brought prisoners to Moreton Bay.

He was on the list of Surgeons of the Royal Navy, retired in 1864.

He is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence: 11 Mansion House Road, Grange Edinburgh. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Susrgeons Edinburgh 1819. M.D. University Edinburgh 1821.

George Moxey and his wife Isabella can be found in the 1881 Census residing at 11 S. Mansionhouse Edinburgh with 1 servant. His occupation is given as retired Staff Surgeon R.N. George is 79 and Isabella 74. He died soon afterwards.

 

 

MUNRO, John R.N. *15 August 1838

 

John Munro was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Emily in 1844 (VDL)

 

 

 

 

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Surgeon Superintendents - Convicts Ships (M)

 


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Convict Ship Surgeons - M

 

A

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

 

 

Samuel Mackay Colin McLaughlin James Mileham
     
D. Mackenzie Robert McLean Andrew Millar
     
Robert Maclean John McMillan James Mitchell
     
Alexander C. Macleroy Daniel McNamara Andrew Montgomery
     
  James McTernan  James Moodie
George D. Maclaren Patrick McTernan J. Morgan
     
Benjamin McAvoy J.O. McWilliam John Morgan
     
George McClure Patrick Magovern James Morice
     
Robert McCrea Henry Mahon Harvey Morris
     
W. McCrea Maine John Mortimer
     
Thomas Wallis McDonald Robert Malcolm John Arnold Mould
     
William McDonald William Marshall Jacob Mountgarrett
     
William McDowell William Martin George Todd Moxey
     
Alexander McKechnie Martin Mason John Munro
     
James McKerrow Patrick Martyn  
     
Allen McLaren James A Mercer  

 

 *Date of Seniority Royal Navy  

 


MACKAY, Samuel R.N., *22 July 1806

 

Samuel Mackay was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Waverley to Van Diemen's Land in 1842 .

On 25th August and 1st September 1842 one hundred and forty seven female convicts and forty of their children were embarked on the Waverley from the depot at Grange Gorman Lane, Dublin, all in a healthy state. The Waverley departed Dublin 4th September 1842.

There was fine weather for most of the voyage to Australia and therefore the prisoners and children were allowed on deck from 9 am to 6pm when they were mustered and returned to the prison for the night.

There were only eleven cases in the surgeon's journal and one death, that of a young boy.

Samuel Mackay was careful to keep the prison clean and well ventilated and the convicts arrived at the Derwent on 15th December 1842 in a healthy state.

 

 

 

 

 

MACKENZIE, D
 

D. Mackenzie was employed as surgeon on the Earl Spencer in 1813

 

 

 

MACLEAN, (MCLEAN) Robert

 

Robert Maclean was appointed surgeon to the Tory 1847 (VDL) 

 

 

 

MACLEROY, Alexander C.
 

Alexander Macleroy was appointed to the Phoebe 1845 ( VDL)

 

 

 

MACLAREN, George David

 

George D. Maclaren was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841.  He was appointed to the Magicienne. He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the William Hammond in 1856 (to Western Australia) 

He was listed in the Medical Registry 1865 - Staff Surgeon, Royal Navy. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Surgeons, Edinburgh 1827

 

 

MCAVOY, Benjamin R.N., * 5 April 1830

 

Benjamin McAvoy was on the list of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841.

He was appointed Surgeon to the Modeste in 1842

 

 

MCLURE, George R.N., * 24 July 1810

George McLure was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

George McClure was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ships Westmoreland in 1838 and Nautilus in 1840.

Before he departed on the Westmoreland a Public Dinner was given at Clawson's Hotel, Newtonbreda....... The party consisted of about 110 persons and embraced the Clergy of the Established and Presbyterian churches, several Magistrates, and a number of merchants and professional gentlemen and the most influential farmers of the neighborhood. William Boyd of Fortbreda, Esq., presided; he was supported by Samuel Cleland, of Stormont . The respectability of the assembly the harmonious blending together of so many persons of different opinions in religion and politics and the kindness that distinguished the entire proceedings of the evening bore testimony in favour of Surgeon McClure's well deserved popularity over a very large district of the wealthiest and best informed part of Ireland. After the usual loyal and patriotic toasts the Chairman prefaced the health of their guest by saying he felt assured he spoke the sincere opinions of all present in expressing deep regret at the loss which they were about to sustain in the departure of Surgeon McClure. Whilst the nation would be benefitted by a gentleman of his intelligence and experience going into active service, a large district of country would meet with a heavy deprivation. Surgeon McClure's skill, zeal, unwearied labour and humanity were the theme of general praise and universal gratitude.  After the continued cheering had subsided, Surgeon McClure, evidently much affected, expressed the deep sense of gratitude he entertained for this distinguished mark of  private affection and kindness. He felt he was surrounded by friends from whom he was about to be painfully separated, but he new he was about to engage in a public service, from which no good officer should ever flinch (cheers). To he and to his family it was a source of much gratification to find that during his residence in this enlightened part of Ireland he had so deported himself as to obtain the good opinion of so many persons of rank, influence, and moral worth. When he returned he trusted he would again enjoy the same enviable station. Surgeon McClure sat down amid long continued cheers...... Belfast Newsletter 3 April 1838.

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841.

He died in September or October 1849 (Morning Post 2 October 1849)

 

 

 
MCCREA, Robert
 

Employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Eden in 1849 (VDL & Port Phillip). Left vessel at the Cape because of illness

 

 

MCCREA, W.
 

 

 

 

MCDONALD, Thomas Wallis R.N., *9 November 1830
 

Thomas Wallis McDonald was appointed to the Brisk in 1834.....

Thomas Wallis McDonald was Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Hindostan in 1839 and Lord Lyndoch 1841, both to Van Diemen's Land 

 

 

 

MCDONALD, William 

William McDonald (*21 June 1793) was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

William McDonald was appointed Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Fanny in 1816 and the Larkins in 1817

 

 

 

MCDOWELL, William R.N. *17 August 1815
 

William McDowell was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Hewas employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships:

Lady East departed England 16 December 1823 and arriving in Hobart on 9 April 1824. Medical Journal from 16th September 1823 to 4 May 1824

Harmony  departed London 4 June 1827 and arrived in Port Jackson on 27 September 1827

Diamond  departed Cork 29 November 1837 and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 March 1838. He returned to England on the Spartan in November 1838

Blenheim  departed Dublin 19 May 1839 and arrived in Port Jackson on 27 September 1839

Duncan which departed Sheerness 16 December 1840 and arrived in Hobart 18 April 1841

Triton from London which arrived in Hobart on 19 December 1842.

William McDowell was on the List of the Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were unfit for service in 1841 & 1852

From the London Times in 1893.........McDowell - On the 22nd December 1893, Agnes Grant Eaymond McDowell, of Streatham, daughter of the late William McDowell M.R.C.S., R.N. (The Times 28 December 1893)

 

 

MCKECHNIE, Alexander *21 July 1830
 

Alexander McKecknie was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Mandarin to Van Diemen's Land in 1840

He departed the colony in August 1840 on the Pilgrim bound for Liverpool with Drs. Mahon and Toms.

He was employed as Surgeon on the Layton also to VDL in 1841.

He was listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence 3 Queen's Place, Southsea, Hants & Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets. Qualifications -   Lic. Fac. Phys. Surg. Glasgow 1821. M.D. University Glasg. 1829. Mem Royal College Phys. london 1860.

 

 

 

 

MCKERROW, James
 

James McKerrow was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 11 June 1811

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Earl St. Vincent in 1826 (to VDL)  and the John to New South Wales in 1827.

 

 

 

MCLAREN, Allen (Allan)   R.N., * 17 July 1824

 

Allen McLaren was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 19 May 1812.

He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent to the Hydery to Van Diemen's Land in 1832

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Maitland to Norfolk Island and New South Wales and kept a medical journal from 21st July 1843 to 23 March 1844.

 

 

 

 

MCLAUGHLIN, Colin
 

Colin McLaughlin was employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Broxbornebury in 1814

 

 

 

MCLEAN, (MACLEAN) Robert

 

Robert McLean was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Tory to Van Diemen's Land in 1847

 

 

MCMILLAN (MACMILLAN), John R.N., * 5 December 1807

 

John McMillan was appointed to the Navy on 5th December 1807.

He was appointed to the position of surgeon on the Buffalo at Portsmouth in 1807(152)

He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

John McMillan was employed as Surgeon on the convict ship Speke in 1808. In Australia he joined the ship Porpoise.

John McMillan was employed on the Lord Melville to Van Diemen's Land in 1818

He was on the navy list of surgeons unfit for duty in 1847

 

 

MCNAMARA, Daniel R.N., * 11 February 1812

 

Daniel McNamara was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Daniel McNamara was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Lord Melville  in 1817, Canada  in 1819 and the John Barry in 1821.

 

 

 
MCTERNAN, James R.N., * 18 August 1813

 

J. McTernan was on the List of Medical Officers who had served at war. He was Assistant Surgeon of the Northumberland at the destruction of two French frigates and a brig off L'Orent in 1812, and Surgeon of the Dragon in all the important operations in the Chesapeake and coast of America, including the capture of Bangor, Hampden etc.

 Mass Casualties, a Lessons Learned Approach: Accidents, Civil Disorders ... By R Adams Cowley, Sol Edelstein, Martin Elliot Silverstein

James McTernan was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Ocean in 1823 and the Sir Charles Forbes in 1827 (to VDL)

James McTernan returned to England on the vessel Elizabeth in November 1827. Surgeon William Rae returned on the same vessel.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Asia 1828,   Eliza 1829  Lady Harewood 1831  John Barry 1836  all to New South Wales and the Sara in 1837 to Van Diemen's Land.

James McTernan was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841. He was appointed to the Packet service at Falmouth.

He was appointed surgeon of Deptford Dockyard in 1845 having previously been employed at Greenwich Hospital. (Lancet)

James McTernan was on the List of Deputy Inspectors General of Hospitals and Fleets Retired (25 July 1855)

He was a colleague and friend of Sir Alexander Nisbett.

He died in 1873.

 

 ...The Lancet

 

 

 
MCTERNAN, Patrick
 

Patrick McTernan was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 8 October 1811

He was appointed to the Eden in 1822 (The Morning Chronicle 3 October 1822)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Mariner  in 1827 to New South Wales; the Manlius to Van Diemen's Land in 1828; and the Katherine Stewart Forbes in 1830 and Dunvegan Castle in 1832 to New South Wales.

In all 737 prisoners arrived in Australia under his care and only four men were lost overall. He allowed whatever comforts he could devise for the men and he believed in allowing them on deck frequently.

News reached New South Wales in November 1834 of the death of Patrick McTernan.

 

 

 
MCWILLIAM, James Ormiston

 

James Ormiston McWilliam was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Forfarshire in 1843 (to VDL) and the Hydrabad to Norfolk Island in 1845

 

   

 

 

 

MAGOVERN, Patrick  R.N., *16 March 1814

 

Patrick MacGovern was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Patrick Magovern was appointed Surgeon to the Primrose in 1817 (Hampshire Telegraph 7 April 1817)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Minerva in 1839

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841 and 1843

His Obituary appeared in The London Medical Gazette. He died in 1849 at his lodgings 23 Elizabeth Street, Pimlico. He was formerly of the county of Cavan in Ireland and brother of the late Roman Catholic Bishop of Ardagh.

 

 

 

 
MAHON, Henry Walsh (M.D.)  R.N., *7 October 1835

 

Henry W. Mahon was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Isabella  in 1840

He departed the colony in August 1840 on the Pilgrim bound for Liverpool with Drs. McKechnie and Toms.

He was appointed to the Mexborough convict ship in 1841

He was Surgeon on the Barossa in 1842. The Barossa arrived on the evening of 13th January 1842 with 348 male convicts. (VDL)

 A case of ScurvyDescription: Page from the journal of Henry Walsh Mahon showing the effects of scurvy, from his time aboard HM Convict Ship Barrosa

Henry Mahon is listed in the Medical Register 1865 - Residence Surgeon R.N., Westport Co. Mayo. Qualifications Member 1828 Fellow 1844, Roy. College Surgeons Eng. Member Royal College Phys. London 1841. Lic. Midwif. K.Q. College Phys. Ireland 1863.

No.3934 In Memoriam | HENRY WALSH MAHON | Surgeon R.N. | who departed this life | 9th March 1878 | in the 70th year of his age | "Rest for the weary"...Headstones Mount Jerome Cemetery

 

 

 
MAINE

Indian 1810

 

MALCOLM, Robert  R.N., *3 September 1819
 

Robert Malcolm was appointed Assistant Surgeon 10 June 1812.

He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Sovereign in 1827 (to VDL). The Sovereign under Captain Mackeller departed London 22nd July 1827 and arrived 19th November with 81 female prisoners. Passengers included Rev. W. Yate and Missionaries Mr. and Mrs. Butler, John Abbott and Peter Ogilvie.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Nithsdale  to N.S.W. in 1830

Robert Malcolm was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

It was possibly this Robert Malcolm who bequeathed 1000 to the Naval School to found a university scholarship

 

 

MARSHALL, William Barrett

 

William Barrett Marshall was appointed Assistant-Surgeon in the Royal Navy 10 June 1824

He published Tears for Pity, a volume of poetry in 1824

 

His article on Medical Education was published in the Lancet in 1827

In 1832 he was employed as assistant-surgeon on H.M.S. Dover moored in the River Thames. He contributed correspondence to the Lancet regarding the reported circumstances of cholera on the Dover

He was surgeon on the convict ship Fanny in 1833

William Marshall was surgeon on H.M.S. Alligator in 1834. He spoke at the 14th anniversary of the Van Diemen's Land Auxiliary Bible Society at the Court House in Hobart in January 1834. The Hobart Town Courier thought he was the most eloquent speaker of the evening, who though yet a young man, whose studies had been mainly devoted to the medical profession, was evidently a divine of no mean acquirements.

He was surgeon on the Alligator when that vessel was sent to rescue the wife and child of the captain of a whaling vessel who were said to be held captive by Maoris. The rescue mission turned violent and William Marshall later wrote of the situation in A Personal Narrative of Two Visits to New Zealand in His Majesty's Ship Alligator in 1834 .

Correspondence of William Barrett Marshall of H.M.S. Soudan on the benefits of Vaccination for Smallpox in Africa (1841)

 

MARTIN, William R.N.,

 

There were to surgeons entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814 (William Martin (1) * 12 February 1804 and William Martin (2) *17 August 1815)

William Martin was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Hercules in 1830

 

MASON, Martin
 

More about Martin Mason

Martin Mason was employed as surgeon on the Britannia in 1798

 

MARTYN, Patrick R.N., * 26 January 1833  (Sources)

 

Patrick Martyn was born in Ireland c. 1804.

He was promoted from Assistant-Surgeon to the position of Surgeon in 1833

He may have been appointed to the vessel Tribune in 1836

Patrick Martyn was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Neptune in 1838

In 1841 he was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service. He was appointed to the Cleopatra

He was Candidate for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine, University of London 1844. Second Division. School of Physic in Ireland (The Lancet)

He was appointed to the Imaum in 1847 (108)

The Lancet of 1850 contains an interview about his views on the allowance of spirits in the navy......

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Martyn can be found in the 1851 Census at  Bennett Street St. George, Hanover Square, Mayfair. He resides with his wife Elizabeth and nephew Richard McCormick who is a surgeon. Patrick gives his age as 47 and birthplace Ireland. Elizabeth is 31 and was born in Middlesex. They employ two servants.

He was on the Navy List of surgeons fit for service in 1852

He is listed in the British Medical Directory 1853....Patrick Martyn,  Bennett Street, St. James's London, M.D. London and France; Surgeon R.N.,

In 1855 he was appointed to the vessel Powerful (109)

He published  The Function of the Thyroid Body 1857

He was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy retired in 1864.

In the Medical Times and Gazette in 1866 he is mentioned in correspondence regarding retirement and pensions awarded to Surgeons of the Royal Navy........

 

Patrick Martyn is listed in the Medical Register 1865 -  Residence 7 Bennett Street, St. James's, London. Qualifications M.D. University London 1844.

He is mentioned in 1869 as having many years previously been an assistant to Dr. James Scott at the Haslar Hospital

 

MERCER, James A * 9 February 1815

 

James Alexander Mercer was appointed supernumerary to the vessel Tagus in 1810. He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers of 1814

James A. Mercer was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Asia convict ship which arrived in Port Jackson on 24 July 1822. 189 prisoners arrived at Port Jackson, one having died on the passage.

His next appointment as Surgeon Superintendent was to the Albion in 1823. The Hobart Town Gazette reported the arrival - On Tuesday last arrived from England the transport ship Albion, Captain W.R. Best, with 202 male convicts, two of whom having been taken in at the Cape of Good Hope, at which port she touched on her passage, during which no deaths have been experienced on board. The Albion left Portsmouth on 27th May 1823 and brings out a guard of 32 rank and file of the 40th Regiment under orders of Lieut. Lowe of the same Regiment. Passengers Mr. and Mrs. Sweetman and three daughters.

James Mercer was allowed the usual 50 passage money by government to return to England and in January 1824 he sailed for England via the Cape on the ship Berwick.

He arrived again on the Asia (1) on 21st February 1825 with 190 male prisoners from Ireland.

 

 

 

MILEHAM, James
 

James Mileham was employed as surgeon on the Ganges in 1797

In 1804 he accompanied Lieutenant Charles Menzies on his historic voyage up to the Coal River settlement

 

Sentence and Reprimand of Assistant-Surgeon Mileham in May, 1805...........

The sentence of the General Court-Martial held for the Trial of Mr. Mileham, Assistant Surgeon, viz. :

The Court having maturely and deliberately considered the Evidence for and against the Prisoner, as well as what he had to offer in his Defence, is of opinion that he is Guilty of the first Charge, viz., for disobedience of Orders in refusing to attend a patient in the General Hospital on the 13th of April, 1805, do therefore sentence him to be publickly Reprimanded by the Commander-in-Chief.

The Court is of Opinion that he is further guilty of the second Charge, viz., for Neglect of Duty in not attending a Woman when in labour in the General Hospital on the 13th of April, 1805, do therefore Sentence him to be publickly reprimanded by the Commander-in-Chief; is fully approved of, and the Court- Martial dissolved. The Governor and Commander-in-Chief has to observe that the Proofs are so clear in substantiating Mr. Mileham's disobedience of the Principal Surgeon's Orders in a case when his Duty and Humanity equally required his prompt obedience that he entirely disapproves of Mr. Mileham's want of a due Subordination to the directions of his superior in the execution of his Duty.

The Governor perfectly coincides with the Court-Martial in considering Mr. Mileham Guilty of a neglect of Duty in not  attending a Woman in labour in the General Hospital, from which conduct the Woman's Life and that of her offspring might have been endangered ; and as Mr. Mileham has recently endeavoured to evade his Duty when ordered, the Commander-in-Chief considers it necessary to inform that Mileham that on his incurring any future Censure for neglect of Duty or Disobedience of Orders it will become necessary to suspend him from his situation as Assistant Surgeon till His Majesty's Commands are received thereon.  - HRA, Series 1, Vol. 5, p. 426

James Mileham at the Australian Dictionary of Biography Online

 

 

 

 

MILLAR, Andrew R.N., *31 July 1833

 

Andrew Millar was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for active service in 1841. He was appointed to the Carysfort.

He was employed on the convict ship Anson which departed Plymouth 1 October 1843 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land 4th February 1844 with 499 male prisoners. Passenger Captain Cocknaft with soldiers women and children. In all 830 people.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Tasmania) wrote in February 1844......."Our splendid wharfs were crowded with promenaders on Sunday afternoon, to obtain a sight of H.M.S. Anson, once a 72 line of battle ship, and which has often carried the thunder of Britain amongst her foes. How different now her destiny! - employed as a receptacle for those degenerate Englishmen who have been spurned from the bosom of society. By this arrival 500 men have been added to our convict population. The Anson is the largest vessel which has ever been in our harbour, and is commanded by Captain Coghlan, half brother as we understand to Mr. Driscoll, the respected Manager of the Colonial Bank. With prisoners, guard, crew and passengers , she has nearly a thousand souls on board. Mr. Forster a son of the A.P.M. of Brighton acted as chaplain on the voyage out. The Anson is an old vessel and masted with the spars of one of the old 42's her own spars being too heavy for a merchant crew to handle properly. She left Plymouth on the 1st October, and put into Rio Janeiro, where she remained 14 days. The Anson is to be employed as a hulk for the reception of female probationers. The Troops on board consisted of part of the 51st, 58th 96th and 99th regiments.

 

 

 

MITCHELL, James R.N., *8 March 1817
 

James Mitchell was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 22 November 1809

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Neptune  in 1820, Guildford  in 1822, and the Guildford in 1824.

 

 

 

MONTGOMERY, Andrew
 

Andrew Montgomery was born in Eniskillen,  Ireland c. 1792 (1851 Census). He was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 20 November 1813 and was promoted to the position of surgeon in 1817

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Elizabeth in 1820. The Elizabeth departed the Downs 18 August 1820 and arrived in Port Jackson on 31 December 1820.

Soon after arrival in New South Wales, he joined Philip Parker King's fourth and last survey expedition. His appointment to the Bathurst survey vessel was officially announced in England in the newspapers in October 1821, however by this time the expedition was already over....

.....They embarked on the Bathurst, a 170 ton teak built vessel which had recently been considerably repaired at Calcutta. Philip Parker King wrote that by this vessel they gained a great addition to their comforts; and, besides increasing the number of their crew, were much better off in regard to boats; for they now possessed a long boat large enough to carry out and weigh an anchor, or save the crew if any accident should happen to the vessel; a resource they had not possessed in the previous vessel the Mermaid. Perceval Baskerville one of the Dromedary's midshipmen joined the expedition and Andrew Montgomery joined the expedition in place of surgeon Mr. Hunter. Others on the vessel included Frederick Bedwell, John S. Roe, and Allan Cunningham.....After experiencing many tedious and unexpected delays in equipping the Bathurst, notwithstanding our wants were few, and the greater part of our repairs were effected by our own people, we were not completed for sea until the 26th May, when we sailed from Port Jackson upon our fourth and last voyage to the north coast.....

Boongaree, the native who had formerly accompanied us, volunteered his services whilst the vessel was preparing for the voyage, which I gladly accepted; but when the day of the departure drew nigh he kept aloof; and the morning that we sailed his place was filled by another volunteer, Bundell; who proved not only to be a more active seaman, but was of much greater service to us than his countryman Boongaree had been . This addition made our number thirty three.

Three day after we left the port a discovery was made of another addition to the number of the crew. Upon opening the hold, which had been locked ever since the day before we sailed, a young girl, not more than fourteen years of age was found concealed among the casks, where she had secreted herself in order to accompany the boatswain to sea; upon being brought on deck she was in a most pitiable plight, for her dress and appearance were filthy from four days close confinement in a dark hold, and from having been dreadfully seasick the whole time, that her acquaintances of which she had many on board, could scarcely recognise her. Upon being interrogated she declared she had, unknown to all on board, concealed herself in the hold the day before the vessel sailed; and that her swain knew nothing of the step she had taken. As it was now inconvenient to return to put her on shore, and as the man consented to share his ration with her, she was allowed to remain; but in a very short time heartily repented of her imprudence, and would gladly have been re-landed had it been possible.

On 23 June 1821 a boat conveyed Mr. Montgomery and Mr. Cunningham to Clack's Island. The reef abounded with shells, of which they brought back to the Bathurst a large collection

On 7th August they came across some natives....By this time Mr. Montgomery and Mr. Bedwell joined us; the latter gentleman was unarmed, but the former had a pistol concealed under his coat, and carried a fish which he held out for them to take; but, as they would not approach us nearer than two or three yards, he threw it towards them, when the shortest native picked it up. Upon this accession to our numbers, they began to to talk to each other, and, at the same time, picked up their spears; but, as the latter appeared only to be a cautionary movement, we did not anticipate their mischievous intentions. I then, with a view to amuse them, made signs to my friend for the knife, which he put into my hands without shewing the least reluctance, upon which he was again instructed how to open and shut it; but as this, instead of pacifying, only served to increase their anger, the knife was thrown at his feet, which he instantly picked up, and then both retired a few paces in a very suspicious manner.

We were at this time about three or four yards from the natives, who were  talking to each other in a most animated way, and evidently intent upon some object; and, as it appeared probable that, if we remained any longer, a fracas would ensure, it was proposed that our party should retire to the boat, under the idea that they would follow us down; no sooner, however, had we waved to them our farewell, and turned our backs to descend the rocks, than they unexpectedly, and in the most treacherous manner, threw their spears; one of which, striking a rock, broke and fell harmless to the ground, but the other, which was thrown by the tallest man, wounded Mr. Montgomery in the back; the natives then, without waiting to throw their second spears, made off, closely pursued by Bundell, who had armed himself with the broken spear; but they were out of slight in a moment, and, by the time that the muskets were brought to our assistance, were doubtless out of gun shot.

We returned to the boat, to which Mr. Montgomery had been in the mean time carried, complaining of great weakness from loss of blood.

Upon examining Mr. Montgomery's wound, which unfortunately was in such a part of his body that he could not himself inspect it, it appeared that the spear had penetrated about three inches; and, from the quantity of extravasated blood, great fears were entertained that he had received a very serous internal injury.

The wound, from which he was suffering very great pain, was dressed according to his instructions but it was several days before he considered himself out of danger.

Andrew Montgomery did recovered from his wounds and in 1825 wrote - Some Interesting Particulars regarding the Nature and Curer of the Cholera morbus while employed as Medical Officer in charge of the Town and District of Chanda near Nagpore.

In the 1851 Census Andrew Montgomery can be found residing with his cousin 86 year old William Henry Phibbs, a gentleman of private means at Clay Hill, Bushey, Hertfordshire. He is 57 years old and gives his occupation as retired Inspector of Hospitals, Bombay establishment. They employed a housekeeper.

In the 1861 Census he resides in Bath, Somersetshire with his wife Emma. He is 67 and Emma 47. He gives his occupation as Retired Inspector of Hospitals, Bombay. An unmarried sister-in-law Susanne Richards resides with them and they employ a cook, housemaid and parlour maid.

 

 

 

MOODIE, John. R.N., *20 July 1838

 

John Moody (Moodie) was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent to the Childers.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Lord Auckland in 1849 (VDL);  and the Blackfriar in 1851 (VDL)

John Moody is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence Melville Hospital, Chatham. Qualifications: Surgeon in the Navy, 1838. Mem Royal College Surgeons Eng. 1850.

 

 

 

MORGAN, J.

 

Mary 1819

 

MORGAN, John

 

John Morgan was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Captain Cook in 1833

 

 

 

MORICE, James *17 August 1815

 

James Morice was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

James Morice was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Midas in 1827

He is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence Elgin. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Surgeons, Edinburgh 1821., M.D. University K. College Aberdeen 1826.

(The Assistant-Surgeon James Morice who was promoted to Surgeon on 31st December 1841 is probably a different man)

 

 

 

 

MORRIS, Harvey  *20 July 1838

 

Harvey Morris was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was appointed to the Racer.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the David Malcolm in 1845 (to Norfolk Island)

Harvey Morris kept a Medical Journal on the Bangalore to Hobart from 5th January 1848 to 22 September 1848. With the approval of Governor Charles Fitz roy, he returned to England in the Calcutta

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Rodney to Van Diemen's Land in 1851. One of the prisoners of the Rodney Charles Dawnes was photographed in 1874 and the image is included on the National Library of Australia site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORTIMER, John  R. N., *17 February 1806

 

1809.......

 .....The code of health and longevity: or, A general view of the rules and ... By Sir John Sinclair

1810....Surgeon at the hospital at Martinique (Naval Chronicle)

1814  .....John Mortimer was assigned as Surgeon to the hospital at Barbadoes

1816....He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Fame. The Fame departed England on 9 October 1816 and arrived in Port Jackson on 8th March 1817.

1820 .....he was practising at Torrington.......(click on the text below to read more)

 

1829.....John Mortimer was on the List of Gentlemen  who passed their Surgical Examinations at Edinburgh - August 2 1829 - Since August 1828, the following Gentlemen, two hundred and four in number, have appeared before the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, and having produced certificates of their completing the course of study prescribed by the College, and having been admitted on examination, have been found fully qualified to practise the arts of Anatomy, Surgery, and Pharmacy, and have received Diplomas accordingly. (Edinburgh medical and Surgical Volume.)

1831 he was employed as Surgeon to the Haslar Hospital (The Lancet).

1840 - He was appointed Deputy Inspector of Hospitals on 22 August 1840 (Haslar Hospital)...Navy List

1846 - Appointed Medical Inspector of Hospitals and Fleets on 9th November 1846 (Navy List)

1856 - He died at Gosport age 74 on 20 April 1856 (Gentleman's Magazine)

 

 

MOULD, John Arnold *7 August 1827

 

John Arnold Mould was born in Devon c. 1807.

He was on the return of Officers of the Medical Department of the Navy promoted from Assistant-Surgeon to Surgeon on 20 July 1838 (Hampshire Telegraph 30 July 1838)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Sir Robert Peel in 1845. The Sir Robert Peel departed London on 9 September 1844 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land on 26 December 1844.

John Mould's wife Anne, daughter of John Borlase of Castle Horneck, Penzance, Cornwall died at Myrtle Cottage, Paignton in 1849 (Royal Cornwall Gazette 2 February 1849)

In the 1851 Census John Mould resided at Stoke Damerel, Devon. He gives his age as 44 and status widower. His brother Thomas age 35 (a dentist), sister Elizabeth age 32, sister Louisa age 27, daughters Sarah age 11 and Anne age 9 reside with him. They have two servants. He stated his occupation as Surgeon R.N. half pay.

John's brother William Pattison Mould was also a surgeon. In the 1851 census he resided at Plymstock, Devon and gives his age as 44. His wife Mary is 43 and they have daughters Fanny age 8 and Sarah age 1 and sons Pentland age 6 and William age 4.

John Arnold Mould was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1852.

He was on the List of Officers, Crew and Marines on board a vessel at Malta when the 1861 UK Census was taken. He gave his age as 54 and status married.

He was on the list of Deputy Inspectors General of Hospitals and Fleets Retired (28 July 1862)

He was listed in the Medical Register 1865 - Deputy Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets. Qualifications Member Royal College Surgeons Eng. 1830.

John Arnold Mould died on 19th June 1878 at Plympton St. Mary, Co. Devon. Administration of his Personal Estate was granted to Captain William Mould, R.N. of Tonbridge Wells, Kent, brother of the deceased. (45)

 

 

 

MOUNTGARRETT, Jacob
 

Jacob Mountgarrett was employed as surgeon on the Glatton which departed England on 23 September 1802 and arrived in Sydney Cove 11 March 1803

In 1804 he was appointed surgeon at the new settlement at Port Dalrymple. He was succeeded in this appointment by Robert Espie in 1820.

Joseph Arnold who arrived as surgeon on the Northampton in 1815 mentions Mountgarrett in his journal.....Mr. Mountgarret was long a Surgeon in the Navy, but has been several years chief Surgeon at the Derwent, he has been a great Speculator, but has not made a fortune, rather has lost one after having gained it. He put himself under my direction for a diseased fore finger two of the bones of which have separated & the other is carious. I was not able to determine the nature of the disease, he had received a wound from the Saw when assisting at the Amputation of a man who is said to have laboured under the disease of the Skin, & this wound has been followed by the disease just mentioned. The hand itself was much swelled & there were purple spots on the back of it, so that amputation in my opinion, unless of the whole hand, was inadvisable. He had tried Mercury without effect, I advised an application of powdered charcoal & hot fomentations but I fear with little prospect of relief. State Library of NSW

Find out more about Jacob Mountgarrett at the Australian Dictionary of Biography

 

 

 

MOXEY, George Todd  R.N., *20 August 1829  (Sources)

 

George Todd Moxey was from East Lothian.

Surgeons' Hall, Edinburgh - In 1819 he was on the list of Gentlemen who appeared before the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and produced certificates of their completing the course of Study prescribed by the College and been admitted on examination. He was fully qualified to practise the arts of Anatomy, Surgery and Pharmacy and received a diploma accordingly. (106)

University of Edinburgh -  In 1821 he was on list of Gentlemen who were conferred the degree of Doctor in Medicine having gone through their appointed examinations and publicly defended their Inaugural Dissertations:   - Puerperatum Hysteritide - (107)

In November 1822 George Todd Moxey was promoted from Surgeon's Mate to Assistant surgeon (52) and then surgeon on 20 August 1829.

He was appointed to the Samarang in 1831 which was ordered home in 1834.

 

He was appointed surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Margaret  which departed Kingstown on 1 September 1838 and arrived in Port Jackson 5th January 1839. He was next appointed to the Woodbridge  which departed Sheerness 12 October 1839 and arrived in Port Jackson 26 February 1840. His next appointment was to the Susan which departed Plymouth 24 April 1842 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land 25 July 1842.

His last appointment on a vessel to Australia was the Mount Stewart Elphinstone which departed England on 26th May 1849 and brought prisoners to Moreton Bay.

He was on the list of Surgeons of the Royal Navy, retired in 1864.

He is listed in the Medical Register 1865. Residence: 11 Mansion House Road, Grange Edinburgh. Qualifications Lic. Royal College Susrgeons Edinburgh 1819. M.D. University Edinburgh 1821.

George Moxey and his wife Isabella can be found in the 1881 Census residing at 11 S. Mansionhouse Edinburgh with 1 servant. His occupation is given as retired Staff Surgeon R.N. George is 79 and Isabella 74. He died soon afterwards.

 

 

 

MUNRO, John R.N. *15 August 1838

 

John Munro was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Emily in 1844 (VDL)

 

 

 

 

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