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Convict Ship Surgeons - D

 

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B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

 

 

 

*Date of Seniority Royal Navy

 

DAVIE, Thomas

 

Atlas II 1802 (arrived 30 October 1802)

 

  

 DAVIES, Thomas  R.N. * 7 August 1809

 

Thomas Davies was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

Thomas Davies was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Medway in 1821 Henry  in 1823 and the Asia (111) in 1825.

The Henry departed London 28th April 1823 and arrived in Port Jackson 26th August 1823. The Asia departed Portsmouth on 5th January 1825 and arrived in Port Jackson on 29 April 1825.

Thomas Davies was appointed Surgeon to the Astraea at Falmouth on 20 April 1832.

 

 

 

  

DAVISON, J.

 

Lord Auckland 1853

 

 

 
DEAS, David R.N.* 7 June 1828

 

David Deas was born c. 1807.

He was appointed assistant surgeon on the Dee steamer in 1834 (Morning Post 21st April 1834)

and to the Hydra in 1839...

 

David Deas was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Lord Petra in 1843 (to VDL). He kept a medical journal from 17th June to 15th November 1843.

He was appointed surgeon to the Amazon in 1844 (Lancet) and to the Southampton in 1848 (Hampshire Telegraph 12 August 1848)

In 1854 he was appointed Deputy Inspector to the Britannia (The Standard 26 June 1854). In November 1854 he was Deputy Medical Inspector of Fleets when he signed a roll of the killed and wounded in the Siege of Sebastopol (Jackson's Oxford Journal 6 November 1854)

In 1855 he was promoted from Deputy Inspector of Hospitals to Inspector of Hospitals and appointed to Royal Albert, flag ship of Rear Admiral Sir Edmund Lyons on the black Sea station (United Service Magazine 1855)

He was awarded Order of the Bath in 1856 (Daily News 6 February 1856) and Order of the Legion of Honor in July 1856.

He was appointed Chief Surgeon of the Fleet (United Services Magazine 1857)

On 31st July 1860 he was married at Hollycot, Lasswade to Margaret, youngest daughter of William Hepburn Esq., (Hampshire Telegraph 4th August 1860). A son was born to the couple on 5th April 1862 at Haslar, Gosport.

He was appointed to succeed Dr. Nisbet in medical charge of Haslar Hospital in March 1861

He is listed in the Medical Register of 1865 - Inspector General of Hospital and Fleets R.N., Qualifications Lic. Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh 1827.

In 1868 he attended the Portsmouth Medico-Chirurgical Society where he made observations on yellow fever in the West Indies (Medical Times and Gazette 1868)

The Blackburn Standard reported on 22 January 1876 that Sir David Deas, K.C.B., inspector general of hospitals and fleets died on Saturday in his 69th year at the residence of his brother Lord Deas, in Edinburgh.

 

 
DEWAR, Alexander R.N., *14 January 1805
 

Alexander Dewar was on the List of Medical Officer who had served at War. He was Surgeon of the Leonidas at the taking of the Islands of Cephalonia and Maura. (1809)

Alexander Dewar was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as surgeon on the convict ship Chapman in 1817. There was a mutiny on the Chapman during the voyage during which convicts were killed and Alexander Dewar was one of three men accused of murder. .......

 ........All three men were later acquitted of the charge.

The following details may be that of Alexander Dewar of the Chapman:

At Muircote near Alloa, on the 4th August, Alexander Dewar Ed., M.D to Margaret Rosamond Geddes, fourth daughter of William Geddes Esq. - Caldedonia Mercury 8 August 1818

University of Edinburgh - On Saturday the Senatus Academicus of the University of Edinburgh conferred the degree of Doctor in Medicine on the following gentlemen after having gone through the appointed examinations and publicly defended their inaugural dissertations - Among the 103 names was that of Alexander Dewar (vulneribus pugna in navali apud Algeriuni proximae facta acceptis) Caledonia Mercury 8 August 1818

Alexander Dewar was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy unfit for service in 1841

Alexander Dewar died on 31st September at Lower road Islington. Lately of Sunning Hill, Berks, Age 80 years (The Time 5 October 1859

 

  

DICKSON, James (1) *23 March 1809

 

There were two Medical Officers by the name of James Dickson in the Navy List of 1814

James Dickson (a) *23 March 1809;  James Dickson (b) *21 October 1811

James Dickson (a) was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ships:

Countess of Harcourt  in 1824 He kept a medical journal from 3rd March to 17 July 1824

Woodford in 1826 (to VDL) Kept a Medical journal from 13th July 1824 to 24th December 1824

Florentia  in 1828. Kept a medical journal from 23 July 1828 to 14th January 1829

Norfolk in 1829. Kept a medical journal from 28th April to 7th September 1829

The surgeon's journals for these vessels are all written in the same hand and all stated to be James Dickson (a)

 

 

 

 
DICKSON, James (2) *21 October 1811
 

James Dickson (b) was employed as surgeon superintendent on the Vittoria  in 1829.

The surgeon's journal for the Vittoria is recorded as being written by James Dickson (b) and is in a different hand to those of James Dickson (a) above.

James Dickson (b) (*21 October 1811) was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy fit for service in 1841.

 

 

 

DICKSON, Robert  R.N., *17 August 1815

 

Robert Dickson was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Java in 1833. He kept a medical journal from 3rd June to 3rd December 1833.

Entry in the Medical Register 1865 for Robert Dickson -  Residence 16 Hertford Street, Mayfair, London. Qualifications M.D. University Edinburgh 1826 Fellow Royal College Physicians London 1855.

DOBIE, John * 14 August 1820

 

John Dobie was appointed to the ship Montagu as assistant-surgeon in 1813 (27)

He was appointed Assistant-Surgeon on the Leander in 1819

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ships Princess Charlotte in 1824.

He was appointed to the Lady Nugent in 1837. (See Historical Records of Australia Vol. XIX) He kept a medical journal for the Lady Nugent between 18 June and 5 December 1837.

The Hobart Town Crier reported on 6th December 1839 that Mr. Surgeon Dobie had retired from the appointment of Health Officer, which he had held for the last twelve months, intending to turn his attention to agricultural and pastoral pursuits. Upon his retirement a dinner was given to him by his friends at the Club house, at which Captain King M.C. presided. The Governor has appointed Mr. Dobie a Magistrate of the territory. Mr. Dobie has made three voyages to this colony; two as Surgeon of convict ships and one in charge of the immigrant ship Duncan. which arrived in June 1838. He was one of the Surgeons sent home by Sir R. Bourke, for the purpose of selecting and bringing out their own immigrants. Arthur Savage, a Naval Surgeon, who came out to the colony in July 1838, as Superintendent of the immigrant ship Magistrate (having previously made three voyages as Surgeon of convict ships) was appointed to succeed Mr. Dobie.

John Dobie settled in the Clarence River district but returned to England where he died in 1866

Read his biography at the Australian Dictionary of Biography Online

 

 

 

 
DOBIE, Robert  R.N., *24 October 1814

 

Robert Dobie was born in Scotland c. 1793.

He was appointed surgeon to the Dominica in 1814 and the Wasp under Captain John Fisher in 1814 - 1815.

In Nov. 1814 Lieutenant Benjamin Andrews joined the Wasp on the Halifax station, where he continued until Sept. 1815. (29) Robert Dobie may also have been at Halifax at this time.

 

He was on the List of Medical Officers who had served at War. He was officially noticed for his services when Surgeon of the Melpomene at the capture of Washington.

Robert Dobie was appointed to the Tagus in 1817.... and to the Vanguard in March 1836. The Vanguard carried 80 guns and 630 men.

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Garland Grove in 1841 (to VDL). He kept a medical journal from 26th April 1841 to 16th October 1841.

..... and the Ratcliffe in 1845 (also to VDL). He kept a medical journal on this voyage from 7 April to 4th September 1845.

In the 1851 Census Robert and Julia Ann Dobie are recorded residing at 7 Houghton Place, Middlesex. Robert's occupation Doctor Royal Navy, on half pay. Both are aged 58 years. Julia Ann's place of birth is given as Westminster. They have two servants - a cook and a housemaid. Also residing nearby at Houghton Place was attorney, a violinist and composer, a schoolmistress and authoress, and a banker's clerk.

Robert Dobie died on 5th November 1873 at his residence Houghton-place, Ampthill square. (The Standard 14 November 1873) He was survived by his widow Julia Ann Dobie. He died a very wealthy man as his personal effects were listed as under 30,000 (28)

 

 

  

DONNELLY, Samuel

 

Samuel Donnelly of Ireland was on the list of Gentlemen who since 31st August 1836 had offered themselves as Candidates for the Diploma of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and after producing satisfactory evidence that they had completed the course of study prescribed by the College, had been admitted to examination and found fully qualified to practise the arts of Anatomy, Surgery and Pharmacy and received Diplomas as Licentiates of the College accordingly (Edinburgh Medical and Surgical journal)

In March 1838 Samuel Donnelly was appointed assistant surgeon on the Talbot in the Mediterranean (Navy List)

In 1842 he was appointed surgeon to the Phoenix in the Mediterranean (Navy List)

In February 1843 he was appointed to the Hecla in the Mediterranean (Navy List)

Samuel Donnelly was employed as surgeon on the St. Vincent to Hobart in 1850. He kept a medical journal from 7th September 1849 to 17th April 1850.

He was appointed to the Juno in 1853 (Medical Journal)

He was employed as surgeon on the Adelaide to Hobart in 1855

In 1857 he was appointed to the Tortoise store ship as an additional surgeon to work at Ascension Hospital (Thom's Irish Almanac)

It may the same Samuel Donnelly who in 1860  was appointed Staff Surgeon on the Cumberland Guard Ship at Sheerness (Navy List). In the 1861 census he is recorded residing at Arundel St. Westminster as a lodger. He was 46 years old and single and recorded as Staff Surgeon.

 

 

 
DONNELLY, William R.N., *13 September 1822

 

William Donnelly was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Emperor Alexander  in 1833. He kept a medical journal from 13th March to 16th August 1833.

 

 

  

DONNET, James John Louis (*1845)

 

In May 1838 James John Louis Donnet of Gibraltar was included in the list of gentlemen to whom the Court of Examiners of the Apothecaries' Hall granted certificates of qualifications.

Assistant Surgeon James Donnet of the Greenwich Hospital was appointed to the rank of surgeon in December 1845 (148)

He was appointed Surgeon Superintendent of the William Jardine convict ship in 1852 (147).  The William Jardine departed Plymouth 3 May 1852 and arrived in Western Australia 1st August 1852.

In 1867 he was promoted to the rank of deputy inspector general of Hospitals and Fleets in her majesty's fleet. (149)

He was appointed Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets in 1870 (The Lancet)

In 1875 he was promoted to the rank of Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets. (150)

On 7 February 1893 he was appointed to be Hon. Physician to Her Majesty, (151)

 In the 1897 Diamond Jubilee Honours he was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath

In the 1901 Census he gave his age as 85 years and birth place Gibraltar. He resided at 5 Park Road Bognor, Sussex with his wife Eliza age 70. They employed two servants.

He died on 11 January 1905 in Sussex. His Obituary was published in the London Times on 12 January 1905...... Sir James John Louis Donnet K.C.B., Inspector-General of Fleets and Hospitals R.N., retired, died yesterday at the residence of his daughter at Bognor, in his 89th year.

Sir James Donnet was the son of Surgeon Henry Donnet R.N., by his marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. John Moore of Dublin, Philadelphia, and Gibraltar. He was educated in Paris, Edinburgh, and London and joined the Navy as an assistant surgeon in 1840. In this rank he was present in the Vesuvius at the operations on the coast of Syria and at the siege and fall of St. Jean D'Acre, and he had charge of the R.M. Hospital at Acre after the fall of that place. Four years later he acted as secretary to the diplomatic mission sent by the British government to the Sultan of Morocco, and in 1848 having been promoted surgeon in 1845, he was in medical charge at the successful capture and destruction of the town of Ngunduvan in Viti Levu, Fiji. His next notable service was with the Arctic expedition of 1850 - 51, in the Assistance, when the first footprints of Franklin were discovered, and then, three years later, as senior medical officer of the flagship President, during the Russian war.

He was promoted to the rank of deputy inspector general in 1867 and to that of inspector general in 1875 and in those ranks before his before his retirement in 1876 he filled many important posts in or connected with the medical service of the Navy. He was in administrative and executive charge of Port Royal Hospital, Jamaica during the epidemics of yellow fever of 1867 and 1869; principal officer in charge of the medical wards of the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar, during the epidemics of smallpox and enteric fever, and cases of fever and dysentery after the Ashanti war of 1873-4 and in administrative and executive charge of the Royal Naval Hospital, Malta in 1874.

He was a member of the committee appointed in 1876 to choose a site for the Naval Cadets College, and also of that formed to inquire into the causes of the outbreak of scurvy in the Arctic expedition under Sir George Nares. At the time of his death Sir James Donnet was an honorary physician to the King. Sir James married in 1852 Eliza (who died in 1903), daughter of Mr. James Meyer.

 

  

DONOGHOE, Anthony  R.N., *6 September 1825

 

Assistant surgeons Anthony Donoghoe and James Osborne were appointed to the Glasgow in July 1821 (30)

Anthony Donoghoe was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ships City of Edinburgh in 1832 the Parmelia  in 1834, the Hive in 1835 and the Calcutta in 1837.

On the night of Thursday 10th December 1835, the Hive ran aground on a sandy beach south of Jervis Bay and was wrecked. Find out more about the wreck of the Hive.

In 1842-43 Anthony Donoghoe was appointed to the Dido

He died on the 16 October 1847 in Killeshandra (31)

 

  

DONOVAN, James (M.D.) *15 April 1835

 

James Donovan was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Rajah in 1841 (VDL). He kept a medical journal from 19th March 1841 to 19 July 1841.

James Donovan was on the Navy List of Officers fit for service in 1842.

He is listed in the Medical Register of 1865 - Residence Killarney Co. Kerry. Qualifications M.B. University Dublin 1827. Member Royal College Surgeons England 1827.

 

 

 
DORKE, Michael

 

Michael Dorke was surgeon on the Lord Hungerford in 1821

 

 

 
DRUMMOND, John R.N., *29 November 1814

 

John Drummond was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814.

John Drummond was employed as surgeon superintendent on the Countess of Harcourt which departed England on 3rd May 1828 and the Prince Regent which departed England 21st August 1829 and arrived 10 January 1830 (VDL)

John Drummond was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841. He was appointed surgeon to the St. Vincent in 1842.

This may be the same John Drummond who was reported in The Standard (London) in July 1847 who was formerly of the St. Vincent was to be appointed to the rank of deputy inspector of hospitals. He was to be sent to the Woolwich division of the Royal Marines in place of Mr. Prior who retired. (32)

John Drummond still held this position ten years later when his only son John died aged 9 on 8th June 1857

 

  

DUKE, John R.N., *11 January 1810

 

John Duke was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent to the convict ship Atlas in 1819 and surgeon to the Superb in 1822 (The Morning Chronicle 3 October 1822)

John Duke and Patrick Coleman were appointed surgeons to the Ocean in 1824 (The Morning Post 5 January 1824)

John Duke was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

 

 

 
DULHUNTY, John *8 July 1793

 

John Dulhunty was on the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814. He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Sesostris in 1826

 

 

 
DUNN, Robert R.N., *9 March 1815

 

Robert Dunn was included in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Bussorah Merchant  in 1828 (reported to have returned to England via Isle of France on the Caroline in November 1828) the Dunvegan Castle  in 1830 and the Jane to Van Diemen's Land in 1832.

 

 

  

DUNN, Thomas Russell (M.D.)  *15 April 1835

 

Surgeon Thomas Russell Dunn was born in Scotland c 1805. In 1821 he was serving on H.M.S. Beaver at St. Helena and was there when the death of Napoleon occurred. He kept a careful journal of his time at St. Helena. Before the death of Napoleon Dunn visited Longwood and described it in great detail however he was disappointed not to have met with the famous French General. Captain Marryat of the Beaver obtained permission with one or two others to see the body of Napoleon and take likenesses and from this Dunn recorded the particulars of Napoleon in death.

Thomas Dunn entered the Navy as Assistant Surgeon on 6th April 1824, and joined the Sappho that month fitting for the Halifax station, where he was removed to join the Jupiter in January 1825. He returned to England and graduated from the University of Glasgow with a medical degree in 1828 and in October 1828 he was appointed to the Ranger with Captain William Walpole and sailed for the West Indies from June 1829 until 1831, he was attached as hospital mate to the Jamaica Hospital. He then served in the Mediterranean aboard Edinburgh and was promoted Surgeon on 15.4.1835. 

Thomas Dunn was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Augusta Jessie in 1840 and the Waverley to Van Diemen's Land in 1841.

He was on the List of Officers of the Royal Navy fit for service and employed on a convict ship in 1842. He married Janet Johnston in Glasgow in this year and his daughter Margaret Wingate Dunn was born in 1843.

He was appointed to H.M.S. Fisgard on the South America station in 1843 and kept a Medical journal from 16th May 1843 to 30 June 1844 while on the Fisgard and from 1st October 1846 to 7th October 1847 while in the Pacific region. Dunns Nook, Vancouver Island, commemorates Thomas Russell Dunn, surgeon on H.M.S. Fisgard when she visited in 1846-1847 - British Columbia Placenames. He was awarded the Sir Gilbert Blane Medal which sold at auction in 2011.

From 3rd Feb 1848 until the spring of 1850 he was employed in the Powerful and the Queen on the Home and Mediterranean stations, and from 2nd May 1850 until 10th June 1854 at Haulbowline Hospital at Yarmouth. The National Archives hold his medical and surgical journals for HMS Queen (in the Mediterranean) from 1 October 1849 to 31 December 1850

In the 1850s he was promoted to Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets, and in 1859 was appointed an Honorary Surgeon to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. He was later appointed to the position of Inspector-General of Hospitals and Fleets.

Thomas Dunn died on September 18th 1866 at his home at Dunallan House, Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire.

He is listed in the Medical Register of 1865 - Inspector General of Hospitals and Fleets, Bridge of Allan N.B. Qualifications M.D. 1828, Mast. Surg. 1860, University of Glasgow.

Daguerreotype of Thomas Russell Dunn c. 1850s

 

 

 

 

 

 

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