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# Surname First Name Ship Date Place Source
             
77125 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel - 1801 17 June Ash Island HR NSW. Vol IV. Hunter and King. 1800, 1801, 1802. Ed by F. M. Bladen. pp 404 - 409
 
  Went to Ash Island with Lieutenant James Grant where they found many species of timber
 
161708 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel - 21 June 1810 At sea The Monthly Magazine
 
  Died at sea, on-board his Majesty's ship Dromedary, Colonel William Paterson, lieutenant colonel of the 102d regiment, fellow of the Royal Society, member of the Asiatic Society, and many years lieutenant-governor of New South Wales, from which colony he was returning to England in the command of the 102d regiment.
 
77114 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - 1801 April - HR NSW. Vol IV. Hunter and King. 1800, 1801, 1802. Edited by F. M. Bladen. p. 355
 
  To examine Coal River in June. To go by the Lady Nelson when she is refitted
 
77123 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - 1801 15 June Newcastle HR NSW. Vol IV. Hunter and King. 1800, 1801, 1802. Ed.by F. M. Bladen. p. 448
 
  Examined and named Freshwater Bay. Named 'Sheep Pastures Hills' at Newcastle - 'The Hill'. Put colliers to work at 'Colliers Point'
 
161707 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - 21 June 1810 At sea, on board the Dromedary off Cape Horn The Universal Magazine
 
  Late Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales. Died at sea on board the Dromedary on his return to England from the colony
 
161709 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - December 1794 New South Wales The Wonders of nature and art: or A concise account of whatever.....Volume 11 - Thomas Smith
 
  On the 25th of October, the Surprise transport arrived from England, having on board sixty female, and twenty-three male convicts, some stores and provisions, and three settlers for the colony. By this vessel advice was brought that Governor Hunter, with the Reliance and Supply, (two ships intended to be employed in procuring cattle for the colony,) might be expected to arrive in about three months. It was also stated, that, the two natives in England were in good health, but they had made very little improvement in the English language. On the 15th of December, the lieutenant governor and his family went on board the Daedalus to return to England, and with him embarked Mr. White, the principal surgeon of the colony; the Rev. Mr. Bain, the chaplain; Mr. Laing, assistant surgeon of the settlement; three soldiers, two women and nine men, The master of the transport had permission to ship twelve men and two women, whose term of transportation had expired. Previous to the lieutenant-governor's departure, such convicts as were confined in the cells, or who were under orders for punishment, were set at liberty; several small portions of land were granted to such soldiers as had made application for them ; and some leases of town lots were given. The direction of the colony during the absence of the governor and lieutenant governor devolving spon the officer highest in rank then in the colony, Captain William Paterson, of the New South Wales corps, took the oaths prescribed by his majesty's letters patent for the person who should so assume the government of the settlement.
 
161711 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - 1839 - Botanical Register by John Lindley
 
  Sapphire Patersonia. A beautiful herbaceous plant, requiring the simplest greenhouse cultivation, and inhabiting the Swan River Colony, whence its seeds were obtained by Mr. Mangles. Unfortunately the brilliant sapphire flowers, to which colours fail to do justice, are of short duration: a large plant will however produce numerous flower-heads, and these, by the number of their blossoms, compensate for their ephemeral existence. The species now represented differs from all mentioned in Dr. Brown's Prodromus, and in the account of Swan So named by Dr. Brown, as he tells us, in honour of his " very dear friend, William Paterson, a celebrated traveller, lieutenant-governor of New South Wales, of which region he for many years investigated the Flora with great zeal." This was doubtless an excellent reason for naming some New Holland plant after Colonel Paterson, but none for doing so at the expense of M. Labillardiere, who first called this genus Genosiris.
 
161712 Paterson Lieutenant-Colonel William - 1821 - Encyclopaedia Londinensus
 
  PATERSO'NIA,/. [so named by Mr. R. Brown in honour of his friend colonel William Paterson, a gentleman to whose researches at the Cape of Good Hope many years ago, and more recently in Norfolk Island, as well as New South Wales, of which last settlement he has long been lieutenant-governor, botany is much indebted.]
 
 
 
 
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