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# Surname First Name Ship Date Place Source
             
174569 A.A. Company Pits - - 20 September 1854 Newcastle SMH
 
  And here, it will be the proper place to advert to certain matters in connection with the present condition of the Newcastle miners, which ought to be carefully considered by working men in every department of the colony s industry. Since the large and increasing demand, by Melbourne, and from other sources, for Newcastle coals, the A. A. Company, in particular, have been harassed by the repeated strikes of their miners-strikes always made when an unusually large number of ships were in Port Hunter, waiting their turns to go under the coal-shoots at the wharves. To provide against those repeated and systematic combinations, Captain Browning, some months ago, despatched an officer of the Company to Port Phillip, where it was understood many experienced English coal-miners, who had sought to better their condition at the Ballarat and Bendigo gold-fields, but had failed, were anxiously looking for some profitable employment. Upon the arrival of this officer at Melbourne, and the object of his visit being made known, he was besieged by hundreds of working-men, anxious to avail themselves of the terms that he was authorised to offer. From these, however, he only selected a party of picked and experienced coal-miners, whom he shipped to Newcastle. Their arrival at the mines discomfited the leaders of the strike movements ; but the tact and liberality of Captain Browning soon reconciled asperities, and dissipated difficulties. It was proposed and agreed to, that the miners should be paid at rates (depending upon the quantity of work performed) of 6s. 6d. to 7s. and 8s. per ton. According to this sliding scale, industrious men earn from 1 10s. to .2 per day ; in addition to which they and their families are allowed, rent-free, the use of a well-built, comfortable cottage in the immediate vicinity of the pits ; with liberty to cultivate as much vegetable garden-ground as the industry of their families chooses to make available. The Company have commenced the formation of a road from the highest part of their grant on the coast line, to the Maitland and Newcastle road; on the sides of which, and the Lake Macquarie road, they are laying out half-acre allotments, for easy purchase ; and so offering every inducement to their people, who may desire to devote their savings to the acquirement of land to locate themselves permanently in the close neighbourhood of their employment. The result of these arrangements promises to be most successful. The miners, have given, by their conduct, assurance of their perfect content ; and in this gratifying aspect, the excellent example of the men who were engaged at Melbourne stands preeminent. Far from the least of the agreeable features in this picture of well-paid and contented industry, is that of the wives and children of the miners from the Companys Mines, and Burwood, transacting their marketing and other little business matters, in Newcastle ; and returning with their large baskets laden with comforts and luxuries (for miners will have luxuries), by the afternoon tramway carriages, to their comfortable cottage homes. This is a picture in which there are many bright lights, and scarcely a shade ; and a far different one from any which can be drawn in a coal-field in any other part of the world. In England, the highest rate of wages for a coal miner is 5s. per day ; without any allowance for rent for his family.
 
 
 
 
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